EurWORK European Observatory of Working Life

European Day on Solidarity and Cooperation between Generations, 2009

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logo European Day on Solidarity and Cooperation between Generations29 April 2009 will be the first European Day on Solidarity and Cooperation between Generations, as proposed during the Slovenian Presidency. This day will raise awareness about the need to promote intergenerational solidarity. On this occasion, Eurofound has put together a summary of some of its recent work on employment of older people and active ageing issues.

Foundation Findings - Drawing on experience: Older women workers in Europe
Older women workers represent an increasing proportion of the workforce in the European Union, especially in the 55–64 years age group. Employment rates for older women workers have been increasing in Europe. However, older women workers tend to work part time and a higher proportion are on temporary contracts.

Living and working in Europe
The European Union, together with its citizens, is undergoing profound change. Demographic change, greater global competition, technological developments and the enlargement of the EU itself are all shaping the lives – both private and professional – of ordinary men and women across the Member States. This overview uses Eurofound’s research findings to capture a snapshot of what it means to live and work in Europe at the start of the 21st century. See also a summary of Eurofound's exhibition 'Living and Working in Europe' at the European Parliament.

Working longer, living better – Europe’s coming of age
Policymakers are beginning to reflect on the role of older people in society as both providers and consumers. If current levels of productivity and pensions are to be maintained, more people will have to work for longer. This fact sheet forms part of the Eurofound resource pack on Working Longer, Living Better – Europe’s coming of age.

Working longer, living better – What companies can do
Many companies have introduced flexible working time often as a way to meet the needs or preferences of older workers to work less and to have more autonomy in deciding their hours. A wide range of work schedules has developed to reflect different needs to balance work and non-work commitments. This fact sheet forms part of the Eurofound resource pack on Working Longer, Living Better – Europe’s coming of age.

Working longer, living better – Who cares?
With the ageing of the population, policy attention is turning to the issue of care. While the role of the family is acknowledged as being central to fulfilling care needs, the need for paid workers to support informal care arrangements has become more important. This fact sheet forms part of the Eurofound resource pack on Working Longer, Living Better – Europe’s coming of age.

Working longer, living better – Focus on all phases of life
Recent policy developments have been focusing on developing more flexible time-based policies to encourage redistribution of income and/or time over the life course to meet changing personal and societal circumstances. This fact sheet forms part of the Eurofound resource pack on Working Longer, Living Better – Europe’s coming of age.

Working longer, living better – Women at work
Just as fewer women than men are in paid employment, many more women than men work part time, often in order to fulfil domestic and caring responsibilities. This has implications for women’s income, career prospects and retirement provision, with the risk of women not having an adequate income in later years. This fact sheet forms part of the Eurofound resource pack on Working Longer, Living Better – Europe’s coming of age.

Active ageing (infosheet)
Europe has seen much economic and social progress over the last 50 years and – although there are large regional and social differences – Europeans are living longer than ever before, on average eight to nine years more than in 1960. The increased lifespan is great news but also poses many questions for individuals, their families and for social systems.

A guide to good practice in age management
This report reviews case studies from a range of organisations across the EU that have instituted good practice in recruiting, supporting and retaining older workers. By presenting examples of good practice, it aims to assist all those with responsibilities for employment in ensuring that age in the workplace is managed productively.

Employment initiatives for an ageing workforce in the EU15
Effective action to improve the employment conditions of older workers involves government policies at different levels, the social partners and social dialogue, organisations and companies and, of course, older workers themselves.

Age and employment in the new Member States
Over the last decade, Foundation research has examined effective ways of promoting the participation of older workers in the labour market, to enhance their contribution and productivity, and prevent their early exit and unemployment. This report extends the research to the new Member States and the acceding countries. It documents a range of almost 30 case examples from the new Member States, and from Bulgaria and Romania, which have implemented successful age management initiatives.