EurWORK European Observatory of Working Life

Articles

EurWORK articles cover working life in Europe, in particular the fields of industrial relations and working conditions. The articles are based on quarterly reporting provided by the Network of Eurofound Correspondents.

  • Topical updates summarise and update developments around selected topics, which are relevant across a number of Member States at the same time
  • Spotlight reports cover in more depth country-level events, debates and changes in regulation related to working life, aiming to provide a balanced view of all parties’ positions
  • Research in Focus articles report on important research findings (including surveys) from the national level, often, but not exclusively, in the area of working conditions
  • In brief articles are short news items drawn from the correspondents' quarterly reports
  • Country updates summarise developments at national level and are published 4 times a year

13879 items found
  • Government seeks advice on working time Directive

    In November 1996, the UK Government failed in its attempt to have the 1993 Directive on certain aspects of the organisation of working time (93/104/EC) - which lays down specific requirements concerning weekly hours, holidays, shifts and other patterns of work - annulled by the ECJ. The DTI launched consultations with business organisations on implementation of the Directive in December 1996, and the process was completed in March 1997. The DTI is now analysing the responses, but is unlikely to produce the results until some time after the 1 May general election.
  • Final hurdles for labour market reform?

    All industrial relations activities in Spain have been at a standstill in early 1997, pending the conclusion of negotiations between trade unions and employers' organisations on labour market reform. However, initial agreements have been reached on types of employment contract and on dismissal
  • Hospitals faced with strikes.

    Two separate strikes have been hitting the French hospital sector over February and March 1997. On the one hand, certain unions are campaigning against cuts in hospital budgets while, on the other hand, numerous trainee doctors and senior consultants are on strike, demanding the revision of the medical agreement co-signed by the health insurance office (CNAM) and the medical profession, which in their opinion hinders the practicing of professional medicine.
  • Bargaining, union elections and workforce reductions in banking

    Negotiations to revise the important collective agreement in Portugal's banking sector are deadlocked. The industry's largest trade union will soon hold its elections, but its socialist members are divided, while substantial workforce reductions have been announced for the coming years.
  • Police follow nurses' example and seek special commission

    A protest march on the Dail by rank-and-file members of the Irish police force, the Garda Siochana, was due to take place on 16 April to highlight their demand for the first independent review of police pay since 1981.
  • The Renault-Vilvorde affair: "Euro-strike" against the closure of its Belgian plant

    The announcement by the French auto manufacturer, Renault, of the closure of its plant with a workforce of 3,100 in Vilvorde in the Flanders region of Belgium, has caused a wave of indignation throughout Europe. The closure is part of a European restructuring project which also includes the axing of 2,800 jobs in France. The response by the unions, of an unusually rapid and massive nature, took the form of strikes in all the group's European plants, and a series of joint demonstrations.
  • Akzo Nobel abandons a standard 36-hour week

    Akzo Nobel has announced that it will not observe its 1995 collective agreement and that it will abandon the introduction of a standard 36-hour week as of 1 July 1997. Its new proposals have divided the unions.
  • Privatisation reforms human resource management at Lisnave shipyards

    Portugal's major Lisnave shipyards are being privatised. New industrial readjustment and work organisation strategies are reforming human resource management and training standards. However, in a company that has strong trade union traditions, discussions with employee representatives on restructuring have been conducted in a relatively formal and institutionalised way, with little participative input from the employees concerned themselves.
  • Home-based telework on the increase

    According to the study/, Analysis of the prevalence of home-based telework in Denmark,/ carried out by Andersen Management International for the Ministry of Research and Information Technology, it is estimated that the potential number of people carrying out home-based telework will increase over the next decade, from 9,000 at present to 250,000. The study defines home-based telework as situations where 20% or more of work is carried out from a home-based workplace using information technology. Home-based telework is expected to be more efficient if it is limited to two to three working days a week.
  • Regional employers' association in the building industry quits peak associations

    On 19 March 1997, the general meeting of the Fachgemeinschaft Bau Berlin und Brandenburg, the regional industry and employers' association for the building industry in the federal states of Berlin and Brandenburg, decided to quit the Zentralverband des Deutschen Baugewerbes (Central Association of the German Building Trade, ZDB) and the Hauptverband der Deutschen Bauindustrie (Federal Association of the German Building Industry, HDB). In future, the regional association will no longer participate in the highly centralised collective bargaining system of the building industry, which includes central framework agreements (Manteltarifverträge) and national wage agreements (Lohntarifverträge).

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