Publications

Search results: 858 items found
  • Article
    16 Prosinec 2003

    The long awaited report [1] of a National Task Force on Medical Staffing,
    chaired by David Hanly, was published in October 2003, making a number of
    proposals for reforming the Irish health service. A number of formidable
    industrial relations hurdles will have to be cleared if the proposals are to
    be implemented; not least in relation to the requirement to reduce the
    working hours of junior doctors in order to comply with the relevant EU
    working time Directive.

    [1] http://www.doh.ie/publications/hanly.html

  • Article
    16 Prosinec 2003

    The 'compact for constructive participation' in the semi-state airport
    management company, Aer Rianta, dates back to the mid-1990s, when a Joint
    Union Company Group (JUCG), which was at the centre of the process,
    established multi-level proposals for 'partnership' in three Irish airports -
    Dublin, Shannon and Cork. These proposals were set out in two key documents
    (explored in more detail below): The compact itself, entitled 'Towards
    constructive participation: a positive approach to management/union
    relationships' (1994); and the 'Requisite arrangements' (1995) .

  • Article
    16 Prosinec 2003

    European Union heads of state and government met in Brussels on 12 December
    2003 for a European Council summit, under the outgoing Italian EU Presidency.
    A range of issues were discussed, including employment and social policy
    questions.

  • Article
    16 Prosinec 2003

    Collective bargaining in the early months of 2004 over new collective
    agreements in the trend-setting private sector bargaining area covered by the
    Confederation of Danish Trade Unions (Landsorganisationen i Danmark, LO) and
    the Danish Employers' Confederation (Dansk Arbejdsgiverforening, DA) - to
    succeed the four-year agreements concluded in 2000 (DK0002168F [1]) - is
    likely to be very difficult. The current economic situation sets a very
    narrow framework for the improvements that can be negotiated, while the
    labour market policy of the coalition government of the Liberal Party
    (Venstre) and Conservative Party (Det Konservative Folkeparti) since it came
    to office in 2001 (DK0112147F [2]) has led to uncertainty as to the political
    interventions that can be expected in some key fields. It will also be
    difficult for the negotiators to build a bridge between the employers’
    demands for increased flexibility and the trade unions' demands for
    improvements in relation to special working time arrangements.

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/undefined-working-conditions/compromise-means-renewed-stability-in-danish-industrial-relations
    [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/undefined/new-government-challenges-trade-union-movement

  • Article
    16 Prosinec 2003

    Bargaining over a new collective agreement for the metalworking industry
    started on 15 December 2003, and the employers’ association,Gesamtmetall,
    is seeking more flexible working time arrangements at establishment level. It
    states that its goals in the bargaining round are not only to secure jobs and
    incomes in a difficult environment, but also to create new jobs, and
    establishment-specific working time arrangements are seen as a key measure in
    this respect.

  • Article
    16 Prosinec 2003

    In November 2003, representatives of the Belgian Red Cross and its trade
    unions signed a final agreement which ended a dispute which started between
    them two months earlier, following the dismissal of four workers.

  • Article
    16 Prosinec 2003

    Workers at Austrian Federal Railways (Österreichische Bundesbahnen, ÖBB)
    went on strike on 4 November 2003 and from 12 to 14 November 2003 (including
    a continuous period of 66 hours). These strikes, which followed a two-week
    overtime ban which started in mid-October, constituted the largest-scale
    industrial action at the company since 1945.

  • Article
    15 Prosinec 2003

    On 2 December 2003, the UK government introduced the Employment Relations
    Bill [1] in the House of Commons. This article summarises the background to
    the legislation, its key provisions and the reaction from employers and trade
    unions.

    [1] http://www.parliament.the-stationery-office.co.uk/pa/cm200304/cmbills/007/2004007.htm

  • Article
    15 Prosinec 2003

    A long-running concern for successive UK governments has been the persistent
    productivity gap between the UK and its main competitors (UK9805121F [1]).
    Productivity has taken centre stage in the 'New' Labour government’s
    economic strategy (UK9902182F [2]), being viewed as the key to raising
    competitiveness and improving overall prosperity. In order to provide a new
    perspective on the problem, the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) and
    the Economic and Social Research Council commissioned Professor Michael
    Porter of Harvard Business School to investigate the current state of UK
    competitiveness. The report, UK Competitiveness: moving to the next stage
    [3], (co-authored by Christian Ketels) was published in May 2003.

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/undefined-labour-market/the-uk-productivity-gap
    [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/undefined-labour-market-business/productivity-competitiveness-and-the-knowledge-driven-economy-a-new-agenda
    [3] http://www.dti.gov.uk/economics/paper3-porter-ketels.pdf

  • Article
    15 Prosinec 2003

    In November 2003, the EIRO national centres in each EU Member State (plus
    Norway), were asked, in response to a questionnaire, to give a brief overview
    of: the procedures and costs involved in collective redundancies - ie the
    dismissal of a number of employees for economic/organisational reasons
    (rather than reasons related to the individuals concerned); the levels of,
    and reasons for, redundancies over recent years; and current debate on the
    issue. The Swedish responses are set out below (along with the questions
    asked).