Publications

Search results: 858 items found
  • Article
    15 Prosinec 2003

    In November 2003, the EIRO national centres in each EU Member State (plus
    Norway), were asked, in response to a questionnaire, to give a brief overview
    of: the procedures and costs involved in collective redundancies - ie the
    dismissal of a number of employees for economic/organisational reasons
    (rather than reasons related to the individuals concerned); the levels of,
    and reasons for, redundancies over recent years; and current debate on the
    issue. The Norwegian responses are set out below (along with the questions
    asked).

  • Article
    15 Prosinec 2003

    In November 2003, the EIRO national centres in each EU Member State (plus
    Norway), were asked, in response to a questionnaire, to give a brief overview
    of: the procedures and costs involved in collective redundancies - ie the
    dismissal of a number of employees for economic/organisational reasons
    (rather than reasons related to the individuals concerned); the levels of,
    and reasons for, redundancies over recent years; and current debate on the
    issue. The Dutch responses are set out below (along with the questions
    asked).

  • Article
    15 Prosinec 2003

    EU employment and social affairs ministers met in Brussels on 1 and 2
    December 2003 within the framework of the Employment, Social Policy, Health
    and Consumer Affairs Council, the last such meeting under the Italian
    Presidency of the Council of the European Union of the second half of 2003.

  • Article
    15 Prosinec 2003

    In November 2003, the EIRO national centres in each EU Member State (plus
    Norway), were asked, in response to a questionnaire, to give a brief overview
    of: the procedures and costs involved in collective redundancies - ie the
    dismissal of a number of employees for economic/organisational reasons
    (rather than reasons related to the individuals concerned); the levels of,
    and reasons for, redundancies over recent years; and current debate on the
    issue. The Belgian responses are set out below (along with the questions
    asked).

  • Article
    14 Prosinec 2003

    In November 2003, the EIRO national centres in each EU Member State (plus
    Norway), were asked, in response to a questionnaire, to give a brief overview
    of: the procedures and costs involved in collective redundancies - ie the
    dismissal of a number of employees for economic/organisational reasons
    (rather than reasons related to the individuals concerned); the levels of,
    and reasons for, redundancies over recent years; and current debate on the
    issue. The UK responses are set out below (along with the questions asked).

  • Article
    14 Prosinec 2003

    During 2003, Slovak trade unions have been unusually active in terms of
    organising industrial action and other forms of protest, often expressing
    dissatisfaction with the policy of the centre-right government which came to
    office in October 2002 (SK0212101N [1]). They have organised: a symbolic
    blockade of the Ministry of Labour, Social Affairs and the Family; a
    three-day national rail strike (SK0306101F [2]); a blockade of borders and
    motorways; and a 12-hour warning strike by teachers in June, which closed the
    majority of state schools. At a meeting in September, the central strike
    committee of the Confederation of Trade Unions of the Slovak Republic
    (Konfederácia odborových zvazov Slovenskej republiky,KOZ SR [3]) emphasised
    the following four main demands, aimed at easing the current difficult social
    and employment situation:

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/unions-protest-against-new-governments-social-policy
    [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/slovakias-first-strikes-hit-railways
    [3] http://www.kozsr.sk/

  • Article
    14 Prosinec 2003

    Slovak government Regulation No. 400 of 30 September 2003 (effective from 1
    October 2003) stipulates a new minimum wage of SKK 35 per hour or SKK 6,080
    per month. The regulation of the minimum wage and its determination by
    government are based on the Minimum Wage Act 1996 (No. 90). In compliance
    with this law, the government must set the minimum wage level annually (not
    later than 1 October). The minimum wage increase is calculated by multiplying
    the average monthly nominal wage recorded by the Statistical Office for the
    previous calendar year by a'coefficient of adjustment' (SK0210101N [1]).

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/minimum-wage-increased-without-tripartite-agreement