Publications

Search results: 977 items found
  • Article
    17 Prosinec 2007

    In September 2007, the Confederation of British Industry (CBI [1]) published
    the results of its tenth annual Employment trends survey ‘Fit for
    business’ (2Mb PDF) [2], conducted in conjunction with the Jobs Pertemps
    recruitment agency. The survey, carried out in May 2007, records the
    responses of over 500 employers across all sectors of the economy, including
    19% of public sector employers. This article gives an overview of the
    report’s main findings in the industrial relations sphere.

    [1] http://www.cbi.org.uk/
    [2] http://www.skillsnortheast.co.uk/lib/liDownload/12026/Employment Trends Survey 2007.pdf?CFID=7065596&CFTOKEN=53144318

  • Article
    17 Prosinec 2007

    The Luxembourg Chamber of Commerce (Chambre de Commerce Luxembourg, CDC [1])
    describes harassment in the workplace as ‘a scourge’ which must be
    tackled, on the grounds that it undermines an atmosphere of good working
    relations which is conducive to efficiency. Nevertheless, during the
    consultation of the social partners, CDC rejected in its present form the
    proposed bill which is intended to combat harassment and sexual
    discrimination. The draft bill will transpose into national law European
    Directive 2002/73/EC [2] amending Council Directive 76/207/EEC on the
    implementation of the principle of equal treatment of men and women as
    regards access to employment, vocational training and promotion, and working
    conditions. CDC believes that the draft bill’s definition of the problem
    – while covering the definition which appears in the directive – is vague
    and imprecise and creates legal uncertainty which risks opening the door to
    various abuses.

    [1] http://www.cc.lu/
    [2] http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=CELEX:32002L0073:EN:HTML

  • Article
    17 Prosinec 2007

    Flexibility [1] in working time is one of the most valuable tools that
    individuals have to reconcile work with other aspects of life, particularly
    in relation to family duties. Thus, this practice is gradually extending
    throughout European workplaces as an effective way to reconcile work and
    personal or family life.

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/industrial-relations-dictionary/flexibility

  • Article
    17 Prosinec 2007

    In January 2007, the Research Centre Klaster (Uuringukeskus Klaster [1]) and
    the University of Tartu (Tartu Ülikool [2]) conducted a survey on temporary
    agency work [3] in Estonia at the initiative of the Estonian Ministry of
    Social Affairs (Sotsiaalministeerium [4]). The survey aimed to map the
    situation of temporary agency work and the level of regulation required, as
    no specific regulations on this form of employment yet exist in Estonia.

    [1] http://www.klaster.ee/index_eng.html
    [2] http://www.ut.ee/index.aw/set_lang_id=2
    [3] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/industrial-relations-dictionary/temporary-agency-work
    [4] http://www.sm.ee/eng/pages/index.html

  • Article
    9 Prosinec 2007

    Speaking at the biennial conference of the Services Industrial Professional
    and Technical Union (SIPTU [1]), held on 2–5 October 2007, SIPTU General
    President Jack O’Connor warned that ‘certain issues’ must be faced up
    to if the trade union is to continue in social partnership under the national
    agreement Towards 2016 (2.86Mb PDF) [2]. The union leader highlighted a
    number of issues, including equal treatment for temporary agency workers, the
    right to representation at work and the pensions ‘time bomb’. As the
    country’s largest trade union, SIPTU is a hugely influential voice within
    the Irish trade union movement.

    [1] http://www.siptu.ie/
    [2] http://www.taoiseach.gov.ie/attached_files/Pdf files/Towards2016PartnershipAgreement.pdf

  • Article
    9 Prosinec 2007

    An agreement between Aer Lingus [1] and the pilots’ representative trade
    union, the Irish Municipal Public and Civil Trade Union (IMPACT [2]), is
    expected to lay down an industrial relations precedent for any future foreign
    bases planned by the former state-owned airline. Aer Lingus, which was
    privatised in 2006, plans to open its new Belfast operations on 10 December
    2007.

    [1] http://www.aerlingus.com/
    [2] http://www.impact.ie/iopen24/pub/

  • Article
    9 Prosinec 2007

    The Malta Council for Economic and Social Development (MCESD [1]) was
    established by law in 2001, to act as an advisory body to the government
    while providing a forum for consultation and dialogue between the social
    partners. However, over the years, social partners have often complained that
    the council was unable to fulfil its purpose, due primarily to insufficient
    human and financial resources.

    [1] http://www.mcesd.org.mt/

  • Article
    9 Prosinec 2007

    The annual conference of the Trades Union Congress (TUC [1]), held on 10–13
    September 2007, adopted a resolution calling for a UK referendum on the EU
    Draft Reform Treaty [2]. Union leaders also urged the UK government to drop
    the ‘opt-out [3]’ it has secured from legal enforceability of the Charter
    of Fundamental Rights, which is to be granted under the reform treaty
    (*UK0707049I* [4]). The ‘solidarity’ chapter of the charter guarantees a
    range of rights for trade unions and employees.

    [1] http://www.tuc.org.uk/
    [2] http://europa.eu/reform_treaty/index_en.htm
    [3] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/industrial-relations-dictionary/opt-out
    [4] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/mixed-reaction-to-opt-out-from-eu-charter-of-fundamental-rights

  • Article
    9 Prosinec 2007

    On 19 November 2003, the Hungarian government made several decisions
    concerning the future of Hungarian State Railways (Magyar Államvasutak, MÁV
    [1]), one of these being a major reduction in MÁV’s workforce. The
    company’s board decided that, by the end of 2006, the number of employees
    should be reduced from about 53,000 people to no more than 42,000. Through
    the mass redundancy, the government expected to save at least HUF 22 billion
    (€88 million, as at 6 November 2007). The redundancy of around 11,000
    employees, representing 20% of the workforce, was the largest lay-off in the
    history of MÁV.

    [1] http://www.mav.hu/