Publications

Search results: 977 items found
  • Article
    9 Prosinec 2007

    Since October 2007, the social partners in Ireland have been grappling with
    the concept of flexicurity [1] – a hybrid term that is used to describe
    policies and measures that combine labour market flexibility [2], on the one
    hand, and employment protection [3] or social security [4], on the other. The
    issue looks sure to feature in any new social partnership talks in 2008. It
    seems likely that trade unions and employers will seek negotiated
    ‘trade-offs’ around issues like vocational training and lifelong learning
    [5].

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/industrial-relations-dictionary/flexicurity
    [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/industrial-relations-dictionary/flexibility
    [3] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/industrial-relations-dictionary/employment-protection
    [4] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/industrial-relations-dictionary/social-security
    [5] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/industrial-relations-dictionary/lifelong-learning

  • Article
    9 Prosinec 2007

    Since the EU enlargement in May 2004, a significant number of workers from
    the new EU Member States have entered the Norwegian labour market, the
    largest group of which are Polish workers (NO0606039I [1]). Trade unions and
    the media report that pay and working conditions among employees from the new
    EU Member States are significantly lower than is normal in Norwegian working
    life (NO0405105F [2], NO0506101N [3], NO0612029I [4], NO0609039I [5]).
    However, up to now little statistical information has been available about
    the working conditions of these newcomers.

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/figures-show-sizeable-labour-migration-from-new-eu-member-states
    [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/transitional-arrangements-introduced-for-free-movement-of-workers-from-new-eu-member-states
    [3] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/norway-trying-to-cope-with-the-free-movement-of-workers-from-the-new-member-states
    [4] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/construction-sector-agreement-extended-to-protect-foreign-workers
    [5] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/regulatory-authorities-to-stamp-out-illegal-work-practices-regarding-migrant-workers

  • Article
    9 Prosinec 2007

    The National Surveillance System for Work Environment and Occupational Health
    (Nasjonal overvåking av arbeidsmiljø og -helse, NOA [1]) was established in
    Norway in 2006. Its first comprehensive report or fact book (in Norwegian)
    [2] on the status of and trends in the work environment and occupational
    health was published in August 2007. The report was based on available data
    from surveys regularly performed by Statistics Norway (Statistisk
    sentralbyrås, SSB [3]) over the past decade, as well as data from several
    other national bodies, including: the Norwegian Labour and Welfare
    Organisation (Arbeids- og velferdsforvaltningen, NAV [4]); the National
    Institute of Occupational Health (Statens arbeidsmiljøinstitutt, STAMI [5])
    and its database for occupational exposure measurements (EXPO [6]); and the
    Authorities’ Central Register of Chemical Products (Statens sentrale
    register over kjemiske produkter, Produktregisteret [7]).

    [1] http://www.arbeidshelsen.no/NOA/In_English/
    [2] http://www.arbeidshelsen.no/?module=Articles;action=Article.publicShow;ID=3355
    [3] http://www.ssb.no/english/
    [4] http://www.nav.no/page?id=1073744140
    [5] http://www.stami.no/In_English/
    [6] http://www.arbeidshelsen.no/in_English/?module=Articles;action=Article.publicOpen;ID=1471
    [7] http://www.produktregisteret.no/english/

  • Article
    9 Prosinec 2007

    The doctoral thesis on /Psychosocial job stress in relation to health/ (2007)
    by Els Clays from the University of Ghent, Belgium, aimed to examine the
    perception of psychosocial job stress in relation to health outcomes within
    the longitudinal Belstress (in Dutch) [1] study. In terms of methodology, the
    research is based on the ‘Job demand-control-support (JDCS)’ model,
    introduced by Robert Karasek in the 1970s. According to this model, the most
    adverse job-related strain reactions are to be expected in jobs which are
    characterised by high psychological demands and low decision latitude
    (autonomy and freedom to use one’s skills) or job control, alongside low
    social support at the workplace.

    [1] http://www.pao.ugent.be/belstress.htm

  • Article
    9 Prosinec 2007

    An ‘Assessment of unregistered employment’ is one of 13 projects
    initiated by the Latvian Ministry of Welfare (Labklājības Ministrija, LM
    [1]) in the framework of the National Programme on Labour Market Studies,
    supported by the European Social Fund [2]. The research project was conducted
    by the University of Latvia (Latvijas Universitāte, LU [3]) in cooperation
    with the consultancies InMind Ltd (now known as GfK Custom Research Baltic
    [4]) and Latvijas Fakti Ltd.

    [1] http://www.lm.gov.lv/
    [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/industrial-relations-dictionary/european-social-fund
    [3] http://www.lu.lv
    [4] http://www.gfk.lv/

  • Article
    2 Prosinec 2007

    With globalisation and demographic changes threatening to undermine the
    European Union’s competitiveness, there is general support for more
    flexible labour practices. For this reason, the issue of flexicurity [1] –
    one of the most debated terms in recent years – has dominated discussions
    between the European social partners. Central to these discussions is the
    future of, what is widely referred to as, the European social model [2].

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/industrial-relations-dictionary/flexicurity
    [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/industrial-relations-dictionary/european-social-model

  • Article
    2 Prosinec 2007

    Several amendments to the legal framework on protection of maternity came
    into effect on 25 July 2007 when they were published in the /Official Gazette
    of the Republic/. The new Laws 109(I)/2007, 110(I)/2007 and 111(I)/2007
    amended, respectively, the Protection of Maternity Law 100(I)/1997, the
    Social Insurance Law 41/1980 and the Parental Leave and Leave on Grounds of
    Force Majeure Law 69(I)/2002.

  • Article
    2 Prosinec 2007

    In July 2007, the French government decided to limit the increase in the
    legal minimum wage for 2007, raising it to no higher than the minimum legal
    requirement of 2.06%. In addition, Prime Minister Fillon announced that he
    wanted to reform the process for deciding on increases in the national
    minimum wage (/salaire minimum interprofessionnel de croissance/, SMIC).

  • Article
    2 Prosinec 2007

    The tripartite National International Labour Organization Council of Hungary
    (Nemzeti ILO Tanács, NILO [1]) commissioned research on the understanding
    and practice of corporate social responsibility [2] (CSR) among small and
    medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in Hungary. In the course of the study
    /Corporate social responsibility at SMEs/, carried out by a team of
    researchers from the Business Economics Institute at the Corvinus University
    of Budapest [3], semi-structured interviews were conducted with
    owner-managers of 20 socially responsible enterprises.

    [1] http://www.nilo.hu/index.php?set_lang=12
    [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/industrial-relations-dictionary/corporate-social-responsibility
    [3] http://www.uni-corvinus.hu/

  • Article
    25 Listopad 2007

    Although part-time employment remains one of the most common flexible forms
    of employment in Cyprus, it appears to have been on the decline over the past
    two years (*CY0601101F* [1]). According to data from the Statistical Service
    of Cyprus (Στατιστική Υπηρεσία της Κυπριακής
    Δημοκρατίας, CYSTAT [2]), based on /Labour Force Survey/ (LFS)
    data for the 2006 reference year, part-time employment declined from 8.9% in
    2005 to 7.7% in 2006. In terms of gender distribution, the decrease in
    part-time employment was greater among women, amounting to almost two
    percentage points of a drop when it declined from 14% of women working part
    time in 2005 to 12.1% in 2006.

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/eiro-2005-annual-review-2
    [2] http://www.mof.gov.cy/mof/cystat/statistics.nsf/index_en/index_en