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  • Article
    25 Září 2003

    On 14 September 2003, Sweden held a referendum on whether the country should
    join the euro single currency. All political parties had ended their
    campaigns before the date of the referendum following the murder a few days
    earlier of the Foreign Minister, Anna Lindh, an event which had left the
    nation in shock. The government stressed the importance of all citizens
    voting in the poll, in the circumstances, and the turn-out proved to be 82.1%
    of those entitled to vote. Only in 1994, when the Swedes voted to join the
    European Union, had the turn-out in a referendum been higher, at 83.3%.

  • Article
    24 Září 2003

    The Ministry of Labour's report on collective bargaining in France in 2002,
    published in June 2003, finds that there was general stability in the number
    of agreements concluded. There was a slight increase in the amount of
    intersectoral bargaining, while a rise in the number of national-level
    sectoral agreements was offset by a decline in sectoral bargaining at
    subnational level. With regard to company-level bargaining, changes in the
    data-collection methods make comparison with previous years virtually
    impossible.

  • Article
    24 Září 2003

    A major law on pension reform was finally passed by the French parliament on
    24 July 2003, after lengthy debate in both houses. Although the majority of
    the government's bill - which included changes agreed with a number of trade
    unions - was retained, many amendments were made. Opposition to the law
    remains strong among unions and the political opposition.

  • Article
    24 Září 2003

    In autumn 2003, an economic downturn has led to stagnation in the French
    labour market and an upswing in unemployment, which is nearing 10%. Job
    losses are increasing as bankruptcies and redundancy plans become commonplace
    throughout much of the economy, with some regions particularly hard hit.

  • Article
    24 Září 2003

    Belgium's next round of four-yearly 'social elections' of employee
    representatives on works councils and committees for prevention and
    protection at the workplace will take place in May 2004. This article sets
    out the election timetable and procedure and examines a number of changes
    made since the last elections in 2000 .

  • Article
    22 Září 2003

    In July 2003, the Collective Agreement Archive (Tarifarchiv) of the Institute
    for Economic and Social Research (Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaftliches
    Institut, WSI) within the Hans Böckler Foundation published its interim
    report on the 2003 collective bargaining round [1]- WSI publishes such
    interim reports every year (DE0207203F [2]). The study evaluates all
    collective agreements concluded by trade unions affiliated to the
    Confederation of German Trade Unions (Deutscher Gewerkschaftsbund, DGB) in
    the first half of 2003. These collective agreements cover 3.6 million
    employees, or 17% of all employees covered by collective agreements. However,
    many sectors - such as metalworking, banking, construction and the postal
    service - do not have a pay bargaining round in 2003 because collective
    agreements concluded in 2002 already fixed pay increases for 2003.

    [1] http://www.boeckler.de/pdf/p_ta_hjb_2003.pdf
    [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/interim-report-on-2002-collective-bargaining-round

  • Article
    22 Září 2003

    On 11 August 2003, the Minister for Labour Affairs, Frank Fahey, published a
    consultation paper [1] on how the EU information and consultation Directive
    (2002/14/EC) [2] (EU0204207F [3]) should be transposed into Irish law.
    Interested parties had until 24 September 2003 to make submissions to the
    government, which intends to publish an Information and Consultation of
    Employees Bill in the summer of 2004, with a view to enactment by March 2005.
    This is the transposition deadline set by the Directive, though there are
    transitional arrangements for Member States, such as Ireland, currently
    without 'general, permanent and statutory' information and consultation
    systems, allowing these countries to phase in the application of the
    Directive to smaller undertakings up to March 2008

    [1] http://www.entemp.ie/erir/constrans03.pdf
    [2] http://europa.eu.int/smartapi/cgi/sga_doc?smartapi!celexapi!prod!CELEXnumdoc&lg=EN&numdoc=32002L0014&model=guichett
    [3] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/undefined/final-approval-given-to-consultation-directive

  • Article
    22 Září 2003

    On 23 July 2003, an agreement [1] on the establishment of a European employee
    representation body within the framework of a so-called Deutsche Post World
    Net Forum (DPWN Forum) was signed in Brussels between the German-based postal
    services and logistics multinational Deutsche Post AG and a special
    negotiating body consisting of employee representatives from 17 countries.
    The agreement is based on Article 6 of the EU Directive on European Works
    Councils (EWCs) (94/45/EC [2]). The DPWN Forum is composed of a European
    Works Council Forum (EWCF) with 50 members and a European Management Forum
    (EMF) with 25 members. Whereas the EWCF consists of employee representatives
    from the various countries and operations of Deutsche Post AG, the members of
    the EMF are managers representing different business units and areas of
    activity, appointed by the company.

    [1] http://www.euro-betriebsrat.de/wwwhome/pdf/ebr_vereinbarung_dpwn.PDF
    [2] http://europa.eu.int/smartapi/cgi/sga_doc?smartapi!celexapi!prod!CELEXnumdoc&lg=EN&numdoc=31994L0045&model=guichett

  • Article
    22 Září 2003

    In recent years, although overall trade union membership levels have
    increased in Ireland to a historically high level, there has nevertheless
    been a fall in union density, as employment levels have outpaced union
    recruitment (IE0102164F [1]). It was primarily for this reason that a
    'high-level group' was first established under /Partnership 2000/, the
    1997-2000 tripartite national agreement (IE9702103F [2]), to examine trade
    union recognition. The group agreed in March 1999 (IE9903135F [3]) to retain
    a largely 'voluntarist' system in this area, with change basically limited to
    giving existing third-party institutions – the Labour Relations Commission
    (LRC) and the Labour Court– greater powers to resolve recognition and
    representation disputes. Irish trade unions had hoped that the resulting
    'right to bargain' legislation would lead to more companies recognising
    unions.

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/undefined-industrial-relations-labour-market/the-state-of-trade-unionism
    [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/undefined/social-partners-agree-three-year-national-programme
    [3] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/industrial-relations-undefined/breakthrough-on-trade-union-recognition

  • Article
    22 Září 2003

    A campaign by the train drivers’ trade union, the Associated Society of
    Locomotive Engineers and Firemen (Aslef), aimed at restoring a national
    framework for industrial relations in the rail industry (UK0201169F [1]),
    reflects persistent and significant differences in pay and conditions for
    drivers in different railway companies. The current company-level bargaining
    arrangements have existed since rail privatisation in the mid-1990s
    (TN0003402S [2]). Trade union demands for sector-level collective bargaining
    gathered momentum recently when it became clear that the national Strategic
    Rail Authority (SRA), established in 2001 to provide strategic direction for
    the industry, was developing a collective bargaining role. In response, and
    in order to advance its campaign with the other rail unions, during 2003
    Aslef issued its own report into industrial relations in the sector and
    commissioned two independent studies. The first was by the research firm
    Incomes Data Services (IDS), and the second by Keith Ewing, president of the
    Institute of Employment Rights and professor of public law at King’s
    College London.

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/undefined-working-conditions/railways-hit-by-strikes-over-pay
    [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/erm/comparative-information/industrial-relations-in-the-rail-sector

Series

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    Eurofound’s European Company Survey (ECS) maps and analyses company policies and practices which can have an impact on smart, sustainable and inclusive growth, as well as the development of social dialogue in companies. This series consists of outputs from the ECS 2009, the second edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 2004–2005 as the European Establishment Survey on Working Time and Work-Life Balance. 

  • European Company Survey 2013

    Eurofound’s European Company Survey (ECS) maps and analyses company policies and practices which can have an impact on smart, sustainable and inclusive growth, as well as the development of social dialogue in companies. This series consists of outputs from the ECS 2013, the third edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 2004–2005 as the European Establishment Survey on Working Time and Work-Life Balance.

  • European Quality of Life Survey 2003

    Eurofound’s European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) examines both the objective circumstances of European citizens' lives and how they feel about those circumstances and their lives in general. This series consists of outputs from the EQLS 2003, the first edition of the survey.

  • European Quality of Life Survey 2007

    Eurofound's European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) examines both the objective circumstances of European citizens' lives and how they feel about those circumstances and their lives in general. This series consists of outputs from the EQLS 2007, the second edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 2003.

  • European Quality of Life Survey 2012

    Eurofound's European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) examines both the objective circumstances of European citizens' lives and how they feel about those circumstances and their lives in general. This series consists of outputs from the EQLS 2012, the third edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 2003. 

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2005

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2005, the fourth edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2010

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2010, the fifth edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • Manufacturing employment outlook

    This publication series explores scenarios for the future of manufacturing. The employment implications (number of jobs by sector, occupation, wage profile, and task content) under various possible scenarios are examined. The scenarios focus on various possible developments in global trade and energy policies and technological progress and run to 2030.

Forthcoming publications