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  • Article
    27 Říjen 1999

    On 19 October 1999, the bill on France's second law on the 35-hour working
    week was passed on its first reading by the National Assembly. This
    legislation, which should become law by the end of 1999, lays down new
    statutory norms for the duration of working time and continues a policy of
    reducing social security contributions on low-waged jobs.

  • Article
    27 Říjen 1999

    A joint committee established by the Norwegian Confederation of Trade Unions
    (Landsorganisasjonen i Norge, LO) and the Confederation of Norwegian Business
    and Industry (Næringslivets Hovedorganisasjon, NHO) has been considering
    changes to Norwegian working time schedules. The committee's report examines
    different aspects of the issue of working time, as well as flexibility in a
    short- and long-term perspective. The report, which was made public in
    September 1999, originates in the 1998 spring pay settlement, when the
    Norwegian United Federation of Trade Unions (Fellesforbundet) and the
    Federation of Norwegian Manufacturing Industries (Teknologibedriftenes
    Landsforening, TBL) jointly asked their main confederations to deliberate
    over the issue of future working time schedules (NO9805164F [1]). The request
    received support from the social partners in other bargaining areas. The
    parties emphasise that the committee's mandate is to look at both "the
    individual employee's need for increased flexibility at various stages in
    working life, and the need of companies for flexibility in the face of
    increasing competition".

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/undefined-working-conditions-business/spring-1998-bargaining-round-produced-higher-pay-increases-than-expected

  • Article
    27 Říjen 1999

    A ministerial conference to address issues related to equal opportunities and
    employment was held in Helsinki on 30 September and 1 October 1999, organised
    by the Finnish Ministry of Employment, Social Affairs and Health as part of
    the Finnish EU Presidency. The conference was attended by the new
    Commissioner for Employment and Social Affairs Anna Diamantopoulou and by
    ministers from national governments with responsibility for employment and
    equality issues (as well as members of the European Parliament and social
    partner representatives). The conference focused on "mainstreaming" the
    gender aspect both in employment policy and when integrating social security
    and taxation issues into employment policy.

  • Article
    27 Říjen 1999

    On 14 October 1999, during a debate in the Danish parliament (Folketinget),
    the Minister of Labour, Ove Hygum, was asked the following question by the
    labour affairs spokesperson of the Christian People's Party (Kristeligt
    Folkeparti) Ole M Nielsen: "What initiatives will the government take in
    order to limit or avoid the use of collective industrial action within areas
    of social importance in the health sector, and simultaneously secure the
    rights of the employees to a necessary extent?" Mr Hygum answered: "None".

  • Article
    27 Říjen 1999

    On 23 September 1999, the Department of Health announced that negotiations
    with the British Medical Association (BMA) about junior doctors' working
    hours and overtime pay had resulted in a draft agreement on new contractual
    arrangements. The negotiations followed a decision by the BMA junior doctors'
    conference in June to move to a ballot on industrial action over long hours
    and low overtime pay (UK9906113N [1]). According to the Department of Health,
    the proposed agreement would "modernise junior doctors' pay, reduce hours and
    improve working conditions", and would "provide the opportunity, over a
    three-year period, to see that junior doctors on average work no more than 56
    hours a week".

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/eu-social-affairs-council-decision-fuels-junior-doctors-grievances-over-working-hours

  • Article
    27 Říjen 1999

    The internet and world-wide web are becoming increasingly important in
    Norwegian working life, and social partner organisations are also taking
    advantage of new technology in their organisational activity - partly in
    order to improve communication between members and representatives and partly
    to inform society at large about their activity. Most Norwegian trade unions
    and employers' organisations have developed their own websites [1]. Although
    the quality and ambitions of website information vary, there is a general
    tendency towards increased utilisation of the internet and web as a channel
    for communication and information exchange. As such, members and non-members
    alike are being given the opportunity to keep up to date with developments in
    wage negotiations, further and continuing education, and other important
    work-related issues and activities. The internet is also becoming more
    important in the internal activity of social partner organisations, for
    example to train and educate trade union representatives or to improve
    communication between the central bodies of organisations and representatives
    at different levels.

    [1] http://www.eiro.eurofound.ie/links/norway.html

  • Article
    27 Říjen 1999

    The Austrian government took major initiatives during its Presidency of the
    EU in the second half of 1998, in order to make employment/unemployment
    issues a top priority at EU level. In line with the agreed EU Employment
    Guidelines [1], the Austrian government has pursued a National Action Plan
    (NAP) in 1998 [2] (AT9901120F [3]) and 1999 [4]. In 1999, ATS 11.15 billion
    has been allocated for NAP programmes.

    [1] http://europa.eu.int/comm/employment_social/empl&esf/empl99/guide_en.htm
    [2] http://europa.eu.int/comm/employment_social/empl&esf/naps/at_en.pdf
    [3] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/labour-market-undefined/national-action-plan-on-employment-poses-challenges
    [4] http://europa.eu.int/comm/employment_social/empl&esf/naps99/napau_en.pdf

  • Article
    27 Říjen 1999

    The Finnish Ministry of Labour organised a conference on "Working time in
    Europe, towards a European working time policy" in October 1999. Developments
    in this field are being followed closely among the EU Member States. The
    French initiative to establish a statutory 35-hour working week was much
    discussed at the conference, but it seems that there is not much preparedness
    for a general cut in working time, even though many research studies indicate
    that reducing hours through reorganising work would benefit both parties and
    could decrease unemployment. The conference also highlighted differences on
    possible working time negotiations between the EU-level social partners.

  • Article
    27 Říjen 1999

    On 13 October 1999, the National Union of Teachers (Lärarnas Riksförbund,
    LR) finished drawing up its demands for the coming pay negotiations. The
    claims are the same as those agreed by the second, larger teachers'
    organisation, the Teachers' Union (Lärarförbundet, LF), a week before.

Series

  • European Quality of Life Survey 2003

    Eurofound’s European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) examines both the objective circumstances of European citizens' lives and how they feel about those circumstances and their lives in general. This series consists of outputs from the EQLS 2003, the first edition of the survey.

  • European Quality of Life Survey 2007

    Eurofound's European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) examines both the objective circumstances of European citizens' lives and how they feel about those circumstances and their lives in general. This series consists of outputs from the EQLS 2007, the second edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 2003.

  • European Quality of Life Survey 2012

    Eurofound's European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) examines both the objective circumstances of European citizens' lives and how they feel about those circumstances and their lives in general. This series consists of outputs from the EQLS 2012, the third edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 2003. 

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2005

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2005, the fourth edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2010

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2010, the fifth edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • Manufacturing employment outlook

    This publication series explores scenarios for the future of manufacturing. The employment implications (number of jobs by sector, occupation, wage profile, and task content) under various possible scenarios are examined. The scenarios focus on various possible developments in global trade and energy policies and technological progress and run to 2030.

Forthcoming publications

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