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  • Article
    27 Říjen 1999

    The internet and world-wide web are becoming increasingly important in
    Norwegian working life, and social partner organisations are also taking
    advantage of new technology in their organisational activity - partly in
    order to improve communication between members and representatives and partly
    to inform society at large about their activity. Most Norwegian trade unions
    and employers' organisations have developed their own websites [1]. Although
    the quality and ambitions of website information vary, there is a general
    tendency towards increased utilisation of the internet and web as a channel
    for communication and information exchange. As such, members and non-members
    alike are being given the opportunity to keep up to date with developments in
    wage negotiations, further and continuing education, and other important
    work-related issues and activities. The internet is also becoming more
    important in the internal activity of social partner organisations, for
    example to train and educate trade union representatives or to improve
    communication between the central bodies of organisations and representatives
    at different levels.

    [1] http://www.eiro.eurofound.ie/links/norway.html

  • Article
    27 Říjen 1999

    On 13 October 1999, the National Union of Teachers (Lärarnas Riksförbund,
    LR) finished drawing up its demands for the coming pay negotiations. The
    claims are the same as those agreed by the second, larger teachers'
    organisation, the Teachers' Union (Lärarförbundet, LF), a week before.

  • Article
    27 Říjen 1999

    The Austrian government took major initiatives during its Presidency of the
    EU in the second half of 1998, in order to make employment/unemployment
    issues a top priority at EU level. In line with the agreed EU Employment
    Guidelines [1], the Austrian government has pursued a National Action Plan
    (NAP) in 1998 [2] (AT9901120F [3]) and 1999 [4]. In 1999, ATS 11.15 billion
    has been allocated for NAP programmes.

    [1] http://europa.eu.int/comm/employment_social/empl&esf/empl99/guide_en.htm
    [2] http://europa.eu.int/comm/employment_social/empl&esf/naps/at_en.pdf
    [3] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/labour-market-undefined/national-action-plan-on-employment-poses-challenges
    [4] http://europa.eu.int/comm/employment_social/empl&esf/naps99/napau_en.pdf

  • Article
    27 Říjen 1999

    The Finnish Ministry of Labour organised a conference on "Working time in
    Europe, towards a European working time policy" in October 1999. Developments
    in this field are being followed closely among the EU Member States. The
    French initiative to establish a statutory 35-hour working week was much
    discussed at the conference, but it seems that there is not much preparedness
    for a general cut in working time, even though many research studies indicate
    that reducing hours through reorganising work would benefit both parties and
    could decrease unemployment. The conference also highlighted differences on
    possible working time negotiations between the EU-level social partners.

  • Article
    27 Říjen 1999

    John Larsen, the chair of the Cartel of Building, Construction and
    Woodworkers' Unions (Bygge-, Anlægs- og Trækartellet, Bat-kartellet) -
    affiliated to the Danish Confederation of Trade Unions (Landsorganisationen i
    Danmark, LO) - has sharply criticised the Ministry of Labour's proposal, made
    at the end of July 1999, for new rules on the posting of workers. The
    proposal (/Udkast til forslag til lov om udstationering af lønmodtagere/)
    seeks to transpose into Danish law the EU Directive concerning the posting of
    workers in the framework of the provision of services (96/71/EC) [1]. The
    basic principle of the Directive is that a basic core of working conditions
    and pay provisions in effect in a Member State should be applicable both to
    workers from that state, and those from other EU countries posted to work
    there. The core rules include matters such as working time, holidays, minimum
    pay rates, health and safety and equality.

    [1] http://europa.eu.int/smartapi/cgi/sga_doc?smartapi!celexapi!prod!CELEXnumdoc&lg=en&numdoc=31996L0071&model=guichett

  • Article
    27 Říjen 1999

    The national minimum wage, introduced in April 1999 (UK9904196F [1]), has
    "not had a significantly adverse effect on the UK economy," according to
    evidence submitted by the Confederation of British Industry (CBI) to the Low
    Pay Commission. The UK's principal employers' organisation believes that the
    "downside risks" of the national minimum wage have been "contained", due to
    the "prudent level" at which it was set. The CBI remains opposed to the
    indexation of the national minimum wage, and argues that any proposed
    increase should be considered in the light of economic conditions.

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/undefined/the-uks-first-national-minimum-wage

  • Article
    27 Říjen 1999

    In September 1999, a study was published on the subject of the significance
    of pay for increased effectiveness and productivity in Swedish municipalities
    and rural districts. The survey was ordered by the municipal employers'
    organisation, the Swedish Association of Local Authorities (Svenska
    Kommunförbundet, Kommunförbundet) and carried out by the National Institute
    of Working Life (Arbetslivsinstitutet, ALI). Of 4,700 employees, managers and
    politicians on municipal executive boards surveyed in spring 1999, some 80%
    responded. Sweden is divided into 289 municipalities and rural districts
    (kommuner). In November 1998, there were 738,000 persons employed by the
    organisations represented by Kommunförbundet, three out of four of whom work
    in public services such as medical provision, geriatric care and education.

  • Article
    27 Říjen 1999

    On 27 September 1999, at a joint press conference, the Fritz Verzetnitsch
    president of the Austrian Trade Union Federation (Österreichischer
    Gewerkschaftsbund, ÖGB) and Heinz Fischer, the first president of the
    Austrian parliament and a high-ranking representative of the Social
    Democratic Party (Sozialdemokratische Partei Österreichs, SPÖ), announced
    that the ÖGB-led "Aktion Fairness" campaign would be pursued in parliament.
    This programme is aimed at harmonising the treatment in employment law of
    blue- and white-collar workers: the legal protection given to the two
    categories differs in areas such as compensation during sick leave and
    regulations governing dismissal. A parliamentary initiative on this issue is
    to be one of the SPÖ's first activities in parliament following the October
    general election.

  • Article
    27 Říjen 1999

    In 1998, Finland's SAK trade union confederation launched a project to
    promote the ability of its members and their families to cope in the
    information society, offering members an opportunity to buy a cheap computer
    package. The project has proved a success, with 44% of SAK members now
    stating that they use a computers. In October 1999, the confederation decided
    to continue the campaign.

Series

  • European Quality of Life Survey 2003

    Eurofound’s European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) examines both the objective circumstances of European citizens' lives and how they feel about those circumstances and their lives in general. This series consists of outputs from the EQLS 2003, the first edition of the survey.

  • European Quality of Life Survey 2007

    Eurofound's European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) examines both the objective circumstances of European citizens' lives and how they feel about those circumstances and their lives in general. This series consists of outputs from the EQLS 2007, the second edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 2003.

  • European Quality of Life Survey 2012

    Eurofound's European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) examines both the objective circumstances of European citizens' lives and how they feel about those circumstances and their lives in general. This series consists of outputs from the EQLS 2012, the third edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 2003. 

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2005

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2005, the fourth edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2010

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2010, the fifth edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • Manufacturing employment outlook

    This publication series explores scenarios for the future of manufacturing. The employment implications (number of jobs by sector, occupation, wage profile, and task content) under various possible scenarios are examined. The scenarios focus on various possible developments in global trade and energy policies and technological progress and run to 2030.

Forthcoming publications

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