Publications

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  • Article
    27 Září 1999

    In early September 1999, the General Confederation of Greek Labour (GSEE)
    presented its positions on pensions. The trade unions downplay the importance
    of demographic trends, taken alone, and stress the importance of economic
    policy and renewal of the labour force.

  • Article
    27 Září 1999

    While legislation outlawing discrimination on the grounds of gender and
    marital status in relation to pay [1] and other aspects of employment was
    introduced in Ireland in the 1970s, primarily as a response to EU Directives,
    until recently there has been little legislative provision in relation to
    other forms of discrimination. The enactment of the Employment Equality Act
    1998 has changed this situation dramatically. This legislation, which had
    been in the pipeline for a number of years, comes into force in October 1999.

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/efemiredictionary/anti-discrimination-pay-act-1974

  • Article
    27 Září 1999

    The debate on the level of minimum pensions in Spain has been prominent
    during summer 1999. Pressure from trade unions and others to increase these
    pensions has been mounting against a background of some 3 million pensioners
    living below the poverty line. The issue is also important in the context of
    the forthcoming general election in spring 2000.

  • CAR
    27 Září 1999

    Comparative Study [1]
    The comparative study was compiled on the basis of individual national
    reports submitted by EIRO's national centres. The text of each of these
    national reports is available below in Word format. The reports have not been
    edited or approved by the European Foundation for the Improvement of Living
    and Working Conditions. The national reports were drawn up in response to a
    questionnaire [2] and should be read in conjunction with it.

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/erm/comparative-information/posted-workers-and-the-implementation-of-the-directive
    [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/sites/default/files/ef_files/eiro/1999/09/word/tn9909q.doc

  • Article
    27 Září 1999

    In October 1999, the Health and Safety at Work Act (HASAWA) is 25 years old.
    At the time of its adoption in 1974, the HASAWA was hailed as a landmark
    piece of legislation that brought 8 million mainly public service workers
    within the scope of the law and stimulated greater interest in health and
    safety amongst employers and trade unions. Although the UK's health and
    safety record compares favourably with most other EU countries, anniversary
    celebrations are muted. There is a growing sense that the existing regulatory
    framework is ill-adapted to the changing labour market of the late 1990s.
    Whilst employers are anxious about whether they are complying with health and
    safety requirements, employees and trade unions express concern about the
    relatively few prosecutions for health and safety offences and the low levels
    of fines imposed on employers when breaches of the HASAWA are proven.

  • Article
    27 Září 1999

    In September 1999, a new national collective agreement for the Italian
    commerce sector was signed. The agreement's provisions include: wage
    increases; a working time reduction linked to flexibility; new part-time work
    regulations; and new sickness and maternity leave regulations.

  • Article
    27 Září 1999

    The advantages of Denmark joining the third stage of EU Economic and Monetary
    Union (EMU, or Den Økonomiske og Monetære Union, ØMU) far outweigh the
    disadvantages. On the other hand, seen in the light of the economic policy
    which Denmark has pursued since the end of the 1980s, it would not trigger
    economic chaos if, following a new referendum, the Danes chose to remain
    outside EMU. However, if they do, they will of course lose the advantages
    connected with EMU.

  • Article
    27 Září 1999

    In September 1999, the Dutch government presented proposals for a radical
    reform of the tax system, whereby the tax base will be broadened, the tax
    burden shifted and higher environmental taxes levied. The social partners
    have generally been critical of the plan.

  • Article
    27 Září 1999

    The International Transport Workers' Federation (ITF), with the support of
    the European Transport Workers' Federation (ETF) have organised for 5 October
    1999 a repeat of the day of action they held in September 1998 (EU9809127F
    [1]) under the banner /Fatigue kills/. The aim of the "international road
    transport action day", in which over 100,000 drivers worldwide were due to
    participate, was to highlight the health hazards to drivers and the general
    public of excessively long working hours. The protest was intended to
    underline the trade unions' demands for the limitation of working time to a
    maximum of 48 hours per week in line with International Labour Organisation
    Convention No. 153 on hours of work and rest periods (road transport) [2],
    through adoption of legislation at national level in each country. In Europe,
    unions are demanding the implementation of European Commission proposals [3]
    to legislate to limit working hours in road transport to an average of 48
    hours per week (EU9901144F [4]). Working time negotiations between ETF and
    the International Road Transport Union (IRU) had broken down in September
    1999 (EU9809127F [5]).

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/industrial-relations-undefined-working-conditions/social-partners-fail-to-reach-agreement-on-working-time-in-road-transport
    [2] http://ilolex.ilo.ch:1567/public/50normes/ilolex/pdconv.pl?host=status01=iloeng=154=1=(C153
    [3] http://europa.eu.int/comm/employment_social/soc-dial/labour/com98-662/com662en.pdf
    [4] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/undefined-working-conditions/commission-proposes-directives-to-end-exclusion-of-sectors-from-working-time-directive
    [5] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/industrial-relations-undefined-working-conditions/social-partners-fail-to-reach-agreement-on-working-time-in-road-transport

Series

  • European Quality of Life Survey 2003

    Eurofound’s European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) examines both the objective circumstances of European citizens' lives and how they feel about those circumstances and their lives in general. This series consists of outputs from the EQLS 2003, the first edition of the survey.

  • European Quality of Life Survey 2007

    Eurofound's European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) examines both the objective circumstances of European citizens' lives and how they feel about those circumstances and their lives in general. This series consists of outputs from the EQLS 2007, the second edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 2003.

  • European Quality of Life Survey 2012

    Eurofound's European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) examines both the objective circumstances of European citizens' lives and how they feel about those circumstances and their lives in general. This series consists of outputs from the EQLS 2012, the third edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 2003. 

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2005

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2005, the fourth edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2010

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2010, the fifth edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • Manufacturing employment outlook

    This publication series explores scenarios for the future of manufacturing. The employment implications (number of jobs by sector, occupation, wage profile, and task content) under various possible scenarios are examined. The scenarios focus on various possible developments in global trade and energy policies and technological progress and run to 2030.

Forthcoming publications