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  • Article
    27 Červenec 1999

    In late May 1999, the VOO parents' organisation proposed implementing a
    four-day working week in Dutch primary education as the only plausible way to
    reduce working time in the sector. The issue of how to cope with ongoing
    working time cuts at a time of teacher shortages has caused concern in
    parliament, while one parents' association has unsuccessfully challenged in
    the courts a school's decision to introduce a four-day week every other week.

  • Article
    27 Červenec 1999

    In July 1999, four weeks of strike action by 130 midwives ended when members
    of the midwives' trade union (Den almindelige Danske Jordmoderforening, DADJ)
    voted by a large majority to accept the collective agreement which DADJ had
    negotiated with the Association of County Authorities (Amtsrådsforeningen)
    and Copenhagen's joint hospital administration (Hovedstadens
    Sygehusfællesskab, HS). More than 60% of the union's members voted in the
    ballot and more than 71% of those voting were in favour of the proposed
    agreement.

  • Article
    27 Červenec 1999

    Following legislation adopted in May 1999, Portugal's legal regime on
    collective redundancies has been adopted to bring it fully into line with the
    1992 EU collective redundancies Directive. Furthermore, the law abolishes a
    previous rule that a worker who has accepted redundancy compensation cannot
    legally challenge the redundancy.

  • Article
    27 Červenec 1999

    In July 1999, management and trade unions at the RATP Parisian public
    transport network reached an agreement on the means by which the company will
    move to the 35-hour working week.

  • Article
    27 Červenec 1999

    In July 1999, the collective agreement archive of the Institute for Economic
    and Social Research (Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaftliches Institut, WSI)
    within the Hans-Böckler Foundation published an interim report on the 1999
    collective bargaining round ("Die Drei vor dem Komma. Eine Zwischenbilanz der
    Lohn- und Gehaltsrunde 1999", Reinhard Bispinck/WSI-Tarifarchiv, WSI
    Informationen zur Tarifpolitik, Juli 1999). According to the WSI study,
    collective bargaining has almost exclusively concerned wages and salaries in
    1999, with other issues playing only a minor role. This is mainly because
    trade unions have concentrated their demands very much on pay claims. After
    some years of only very moderate increases, which sometimes even included
    decreases in real pay, several unions called for an "end of modesty" and
    entered the 1999 bargaining round with pay claims between 5.5% and 6.5%
    (DE9810279F [1]). Employers' associations, however, constantly rejected such
    demands and, instead, argued for a continuation of a policy of wage
    moderation.

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/industrial-relations-undefined-working-conditions-labour-market/trade-unions-call-for-a-u-turn-in-pay-policy-in-1999

  • Article
    27 Červenec 1999

    In July 1999, in an unusual event, Spanish prison officers went on strike to
    demand "better wages, an increase in staffing and more respect".

  • Article
    27 Červenec 1999

    The revised national Budget for 1999 was passed by the Norwegian parliament
    (Stortinget) on 18 June 1999. The annual procedure for revising the Budget
    enables the government to adjust its economic policy in the light of
    developments that have taken place since the release of the Budget in the
    autumn of the previous year (NO9811100N [1]). In conjunction with the revised
    national Budget, the government also produced an up-to-date analysis of state
    of affairs of the national economy. Statistics Norway (Statistisk
    Sentralbyrå, SSB) and the Bank of Norway (Norges Bank) have also published
    their own economic analysis for spring 1999.

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/compromise-reached-over-1999-state-budget

  • Article
    27 Červenec 1999

    Since the election of the Labour government in May 1997, much has been made
    of the idea of "partnership" as the new "third way" for UK industrial
    relations - representing, for its advocates, a modern alternative both to the
    entrenched adversarialism of traditional collective bargaining and to the
    unilateral managerialism of the 1980s and 1990s. A government "working
    document" Competitiveness through partnership with people [1] and a Trades
    Union Congress (TUC) statement /Partners for progress/, both published in
    1997, set the tone. Since then, the concept has been promoted by
    organisations such as the Institute of Personnel and Development (UK9811158F
    [2]) and the Involvement and Participation Association. At a TUC-sponsored
    conference in May 1999, the partnership principle (although not every detail
    of the TUC's own agenda) was endorsed by the prime minister, the trade and
    industry secretary and the director general of the Confederation of British
    Industry (UK9906108F [3]).

    [1] http://www.dti.gov.uk/mbp/bpgt/m9m000002/m9m0000021.html
    [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/undefined-industrial-relations/ipd-conference-debates-partnership-at-work
    [3] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/undefined-industrial-relations/tucs-partnership-agenda-wins-qualified-support-from-government-and-employers

  • Article
    27 Červenec 1999

    In June 1999, the debate on Italy's collective bargaining system was revived
    by a call on the part of employers for greater flexibility and
    decentralisation. Trade unions, though with differing emphases, do not share
    this point of view and stress the importance of maintaining the current
    two-tier bargaining structure. Another issue at stake is the redefinition of
    bargaining units and the possible creation of new sectoral agreements,
    notably for those branches which are affected by privatisation and
    liberalisation processes.

Series

  • European Quality of Life Survey 2003

    Eurofound’s European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) examines both the objective circumstances of European citizens' lives and how they feel about those circumstances and their lives in general. This series consists of outputs from the EQLS 2003, the first edition of the survey.

  • European Quality of Life Survey 2007

    Eurofound's European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) examines both the objective circumstances of European citizens' lives and how they feel about those circumstances and their lives in general. This series consists of outputs from the EQLS 2007, the second edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 2003.

  • European Quality of Life Survey 2012

    Eurofound's European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) examines both the objective circumstances of European citizens' lives and how they feel about those circumstances and their lives in general. This series consists of outputs from the EQLS 2012, the third edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 2003. 

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2005

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2005, the fourth edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2010

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2010, the fifth edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • Manufacturing employment outlook

    This publication series explores scenarios for the future of manufacturing. The employment implications (number of jobs by sector, occupation, wage profile, and task content) under various possible scenarios are examined. The scenarios focus on various possible developments in global trade and energy policies and technological progress and run to 2030.

Forthcoming publications

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