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  • Article
    27 Srpen 1999

    On 27 May 1999, negotiators for the Federation of Salaried Employees in
    Industry and Services (Privattjänstemannakartellen, PTK) - the bargaining
    cartel for white-collar workers' unions in the private sector - announced
    that they could not accept a final offer from the Swedish Employers'
    Confederation (Svenska arbetsgivareföreningen, SAF) on a new "contribution
    pension" agreement. This agreement would have replaced the existing agreement
    on the supplementary pension scheme for salaried employees in industry and
    services (Industrins och handelns tilläggspensionför tjänstemän,ITP). The
    negotiations over a new collective agreement on the ITP had been continuing
    on off for almost five years, since 1994, and they failed because the trade
    unions could not come to an understanding among themselves. Two of the
    leading unions within PTK, representing more than half of the 620,000
    employees covered by the ITP scheme, refused to accept. The other 26 unions
    within the cartel decided, after long discussions, to follow this refusal,
    although they had initially accepted the offer. The dissenting unions were
    the Union for Technical and Clerical Employees in Industry (Svenska
    Industritjänstemannaförbundet, SIF) and the Association of Management and
    Professional Staff (Ledarna).

  • Article
    27 Srpen 1999

    The dispute between the Scandinavian Airlines Systems (SAS) and its ground
    staff was resolved after a meeting between management and trade union
    representatives on 9 August 1999 in Stockholm, Sweden. On 14 July 1999,
    Norwegian ground staff who are members of the SAS Personnel Club (SAS
    Personalklubb) had resorted to industrial action, and refused to work
    overtime, in protest against the airline's possible plans to increase company
    earnings by means of outsourcing approximately 7,000 jobs in Norway, Sweden
    and Denmark (NO9907143N [1]). More SAS employees joined the strike on 27
    July.

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/norwegian-sas-employees-refuse-to-work-extra-overtime

  • Article
    27 Srpen 1999

    On 20 July 1999, the government decided to finance the training of up to
    4,000 young people, if they cannot find training places with employers in
    1999-2000. This is the same allocation as for 1998-9 (AT9803175N [1]), when
    3,600 young people were placed - 2,100 in 10-month training courses and 1,500
    in three-year "apprenticeship-foundation" courses. Training course
    participants must have a ninth-grade school-leaving diploma (the ninth grade
    is around 15 years of age) and receive about half the regular apprentice's
    remuneration, while foundation course participants have not usually completed
    the ninth grade and receive three-quarters of the normal apprentice's
    remuneration.

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/youth-employment-measures-agreed

  • Article
    27 Srpen 1999

    Statistics presented in June 1999 and produced by Statistics Sweden
    (Statistiska Centralbyrån) in cooperation with the Swedish National Board
    for Industrial and Technical Development (NUTEK), show a 9% fall in the
    establishment of new companies between 1997 and 1998. In 1998, a total of
    33,860 new companies were started, compared with 37,040 in 1997. For the
    preceding years, the corresponding figures were: 1996 - 36,010; 1995 -
    35,000; and 1994 - 34,670. The new companies created 55,200 new jobs in 1998,
    of which 26,000 were full-time jobs, the statistics also show. The equivalent
    figures for 1997 were 63,000 new jobs and 32,300 full-time jobs. The
    reduction has been most evident in the northern counties of Sweden - 22% in
    Gävleborg, 20% in Västernorrland and 16% in Västerbotten. The statistics
    are based on genuine new start-ups involving the establishment of new
    activities. The statistics do not include changes of ownership or of legal
    status, or other restructuring.

  • Article
    27 Červenec 1999

    In summer 1999, at the half-way point of the Spanish social partners'
    four-year pact for employment stability, later endorsed by parliament, the
    parties have evaluated its results. After two years, employment - and
    especially stable employment - has increased significantly. However, there
    has been no substantial decrease in the level of temporary employment and
    contract turnover continues to increase.

  • CAR
    27 Červenec 1999

    /It seems inevitable that increasing economic integration and competition
    within Europe will have some influence on national collective bargaining. The
    aim of this comparative study is to provide an assessment, as of summer 1999,
    of the extent to which the processes and outcomes of bargaining in the 15
    Member States of the EU, plus Norway, are developing a cross-border, European
    dimension. The study outlines the diverse processes, both implicit and
    explicit, which can be said to be leading towards a "Europeanisation" of
    collective bargaining. Developments across the 16 countries concerned are
    examined at intersectoral, sectoral and enterprise levels, with a special
    focus on metalworking and financial services, and the views of the social
    partners are summarised./

  • Article
    27 Červenec 1999

    In July 1999, the joint employer-trade union administrative board of France's
    National Sickness Insurance Fund (CNAM) approved, by a large majority, a
    strategic reform plan. This package of measures is designed to reduce
    spending and improve the quality of healthcare. CNAM hopes that the
    government will give legislative effect to the plan.

  • Article
    27 Červenec 1999

    In June 1999, the Greek General Confederation of Labour (GSEE) expressed its
    total opposition to proposals from the International Monetary Fund (IMF) to
    reduce the wages of new entrants to the labour market and to cut labour
    costs.

  • Article
    27 Červenec 1999

    The total number of requests to terminate employment contracts declined in
    the Netherlands in 1998, according to the Annual Report on termination
    statistics, issued in summer 1999. However, the number of requests related to
    occupational disability has increased.

Series

  • New forms of employment

    This series reports on the new forms of employment emerging across Europe that are driven by societal, economic and technological developments and are different from traditional standard or non-standard employment in a number of ways. This series explores what characterises these new employment forms and what implications they have for working conditions and the labour market.

  • European Company Surveys

    The European Company Survey (ECS) is carried out every four to five years since its inception in 2004–2005, with the latest edition in 2019. The survey is designed to provide information on workplace practices to develop and evaluate socioeconomic policy in the EU. It covers issues around work organisation, working time arrangements and work–life balance, flexibility, workplace innovation, employee involvement, human resource management, social dialogue, and most recently also skills use, skills strategies and digitalisation.

  • European Quality of Life Surveys

    The European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) is carried out every four to five years since its inception in 2003, with the latest edition in 2016. It examines both the objective circumstances of people's lives and how they feel about those circumstances and their lives in general. It covers issues around employment, income, education, housing, family, health and work–life balance. It also looks at subjective topics, such as people's levels of happiness and life satisfaction, and perceptions of the quality of society.

  • European Jobs Monitor

    This series brings together publications and other outputs of the European Jobs Monitor (EJM), which tracks structural change in European labour markets. The EJM analyses shifts in the employment structure in the EU in terms of occupation and sector and gives a qualitative assessment of these shifts using various proxies of job quality – wages, skill-levels, etc.

  • European Quality of Life Survey 2016

    Eurofound's European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) examines both the objective circumstances of European citizens' lives and how they feel about those circumstances and their lives in general. This series consists of outputs from the EQLS 2016, the fourth edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 2003. 

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2015

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2015, the sixth edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Working Conditions Survey 1996

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 1996, the second edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2001

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2001, which was an extension of the EWCS 2000 to cover the then 12 acceding and candidate countries. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2000

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2000, the third edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Company Survey 2004

    Eurofound’s European Company Survey (ECS) maps and analyses company policies and practices which can have an impact on smart, sustainable and inclusive growth, as well as the development of social dialogue in companies. This series consists of outputs from the first edition of the survey carried out in 2004–2005 under the name European Establishment Survey on Working Time and Work-Life Balance. 

Forthcoming publications

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