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  • Article
    27 januar 1998

    At the 1995 congress of the Austrian Trade Union Federation
    (Österreichischer Gewerkschaftsbund, ÖGB) its member trade unions decided
    to reorganise. The goal is to reduce the number of individual trade unions
    from 14 to three, covering manufacturing, services, and public service. There
    is no clear time-limit for the process. In the first two years little was
    achieved by way of obvious results, but 1998 promises to bring the first of
    these. On 21 January 1998 two trade unions, the Union of Printing and Paper
    Workers (Gewerkschaft Druck und Papier) and the Union of Posts and
    Telecommunications Employees (Gewerkschaft der Post- und
    Fernmeldebediensteten) concluded a cooperation agreement. They are forming a
    jointly and proportionately financed platform to decide policy measures and a
    joint steering committee with proportional representation. The rationale is
    the unions' shared activity in the media sector. By 2000, they want to unite
    their offices in one location. A full merger in the future is not ruled out,
    neither is it explicitly planned. According to press reports, the ÖGB's
    president commented that a merger might have been the result if the ÖGB
    could have taken decisions like a joint stock company.

  • Article
    27 januar 1998

    In 1997 the average number of unemployed people in Germany was around 4.4
    million, which marked a sharp increase of more than 400,000 on the previous
    year. The average rate of unemployment was 11.4% in 1997, compared with 10.4%
    in 1996. Although the German economy is expected to recover in 1998, most
    economic experts in Germany think that this will have only small effects on
    the labour market.

  • Article
    27 januar 1998

    At the beginning of January 1998, Jaguar, part of the US-based Ford motor
    manufacturing group, announced that it is to produce a new smaller luxury
    sports car to compete with the BMW 3 series and the Mercedes class 3.
    Jaguar's chair and chief executive, Nick Scheele said that :"our preference,
    naturally was to build the car in the UK and I regret that we are not able to
    produce an affordable investment proposition to make the new car at our
    plants in the West Midlands but I am pleased that we will be going to
    Halewood."

  • Article
    27 januar 1998

    The Federation of Transport Workers' Unions in the European Union (FST) and
    theEuropean Community Shipowners' Association (ECSA) agreed a joint text on
    working time and time off aboard ship in December 1997. The approximately
    128,000 EU nationals and 26,000 non-EU nationals employed in the maritime
    sector are among the workers excluded from the provisions of the EU Directive
    (93/104/EC) on certain aspects of the organisation of working time.

  • Article
    27 januar 1998

    The average wage growth in 1997 for Norwegian wage earners is estimated to
    have been 4.25%, according to statistics compiled as a basis for the 1998
    bargaining round. For the first time, wage growth for top management within
    the private sector has also been estimated, and it is indicated that top
    managers have had higher than average wage growth.

  • Article
    27 december 1997

    On 22 May 1997, an "Employment Alliance" for eastern Germany was concluded
    between the German Federal Government, the German Trade Union Federation
    (DGB), the German Salaried Employees' Union (DAG), the Confederation of
    German Employers' Associations (BDA), the Confederation of German Industries
    (BDI), the German Association of Chambers of Commerce (DIHT), the Central
    Association of German Crafts (ZDH) and the Associations of the Credit
    Institutions (Kreditgewerbe). The primary objectives of the pact were to
    speed up the transformation process of the eastern German economy, to boost
    growth, to reduce unit labour costs, to stabilise employment in 1997 at the
    level of 1996, and to create 100,000 new jobs in each of the following years.
    Among other measures to be executed by the state and the private sector, the
    "Joint initiative for more jobs in eastern Germany" provided for several
    guidelines regarding industrial relations in eastern Germany - such as
    employment-oriented collective bargaining, working time flexibility,
    "hardship clauses" and special regulations for small and medium-sized
    enterprises (DE9706117F [1]).

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/labour-market-undefined/tripartite-agreement-on-employment-alliance-for-eastern-germany

  • Article
    27 december 1997

    At a tripartite meeting held on 17 December 1997 to discuss the spring 1998
    collective bargaining round, Danish government representatives advised the
    social partners to keep pay increases at a moderate level in order to
    stimulate job creation. However, the government representatives were
    reluctant to specify a precise figure for pay increases, stating that it was
    not the aim of government to tie the social partners to a certain figure or
    to intervene in the collective bargaining process, which they regarded as the
    sole prerogative of the social partners.

  • Article
    27 december 1997

    There are two inter-related factors within UK workplace relations which,
    arguably, are both caused by, and solvable by British managers. The first is
    an increase in workplace stress - the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), for
    example, has recently released figures (in its /Health and safety statistics
    1996/7/) showing that half a million people believe that they are suffering
    from work-related stress. The second is the need for high-performing
    companies. Both of these are in large part dependent on the type of managers
    within the workplace. All too often in the UK - according to some
    commentators - job insecurity, work intensification and "bossy" management
    are seen as the answer to improving performance, but are also the cause of
    much stress.

Series

  • European Quality of Life Surveys

    The European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) is carried out every four to five years since its inception in 2003, with the latest edition in 2016. It examines both the objective circumstances of people's lives and how they feel about those circumstances and their lives in general. It covers issues around employment, income, education, housing, family, health and work–life balance. It also looks at subjective topics, such as people's levels of happiness and life satisfaction, and perceptions of the quality of society.

  • European Jobs Monitor

    This series brings together publications and other outputs of the European Jobs Monitor (EJM), which tracks structural change in European labour markets. The EJM analyses shifts in the employment structure in the EU in terms of occupation and sector and gives a qualitative assessment of these shifts using various proxies of job quality – wages, skill-levels, etc.

  • European Quality of Life Survey 2016

    Eurofound's European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) examines both the objective circumstances of European citizens' lives and how they feel about those circumstances and their lives in general. This series consists of outputs from the EQLS 2016, the fourth edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 2003. 

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2015

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2015, the sixth edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Working Conditions Survey 1996

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 1996, the second edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2001

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2001, which was an extension of the EWCS 2000 to cover the then 12 acceding and candidate countries. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2000

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2000, the third edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Company Survey 2004

    Eurofound’s European Company Survey (ECS) maps and analyses company policies and practices which can have an impact on smart, sustainable and inclusive growth, as well as the development of social dialogue in companies. This series consists of outputs from the first edition of the survey carried out in 2004–2005 under the name European Establishment Survey on Working Time and Work-Life Balance. 

  • European Company Survey 2009

    Eurofound’s European Company Survey (ECS) maps and analyses company policies and practices which can have an impact on smart, sustainable and inclusive growth, as well as the development of social dialogue in companies. This series consists of outputs from the ECS 2009, the second edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 2004–2005 as the European Establishment Survey on Working Time and Work-Life Balance. 

  • European Company Survey 2013

    Eurofound’s European Company Survey (ECS) maps and analyses company policies and practices which can have an impact on smart, sustainable and inclusive growth, as well as the development of social dialogue in companies. This series consists of outputs from the ECS 2013, the third edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 2004–2005 as the European Establishment Survey on Working Time and Work-Life Balance.

Forthcoming publications