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  • Article
    27 januar 1998

    On 7 January 1998 the metalworkers' trade union, IG Metall, and the Steel
    Employers' Association (Arbeitgeberverband Stahl) signed a new collective
    agreement for the about 8,000 employees in the east German steel industry.
    The collective bargaining parties agreed on a flat-rate payment of DEM 330
    for the period October 1997 to December 1997 and a 2.6% wage increase from
    January 1998.

  • Article
    27 januar 1998

    The Austrian Trade Union Federation (Österreichischer Gewerkschaftsbund,
    ÖGB) has launched a campaign in 1998 to make good on one of its
    long-standing demands: the removal of the remaining legal differences between
    wage earners/blue-collar workers (Arbeiter) and salary earners/white-collar
    workers (Angestellten). In the late 1970s, equality in holiday regulations
    and severance pay was achieved. Now ÖGB wants regulations concerning wage
    earners' payment during sickness and dismissal notice periods to be brought
    up to salary earner standards. The ÖGB sees this as the final phase of a
    historical social policy project. The Austrian Chamber of the Economy
    (Wirtschaftskammer Österreich, WKÖ) has made it clear it opposes any
    measure that would increase total wage costs, this being one of the hottest
    issues between social partners at national level. By the WKÖ's reckoning,
    upward equalisation would cost ATS 10 billion per year, while the ÖGB
    estimates the net cost to be about ATS 1 billion per year. There are 1.3
    million wage earners on annual average, about 43% of total employment.

  • Article
    27 januar 1998

    The number of working days lost through strikes in France in 1996 decreased
    sharply from the number recorded in 1995, according to figures published in
    late 1997. Rates are now back to levels registered in the early 1990s.

  • Article
    27 januar 1998

    In May 1997, the group of experts on "European systems of worker
    involvement", known as the Davignon group, after its chair, issued its report
    [1] (EU9705128N [2]). The group had been set up by the European Commission
    essentially to suggest ways of breaking the deadlock on worker involvement
    measures which had blocked the adoption of the European Company Statute for
    many years. The report set out recommendations for the information,
    consultation and board-level participation of employees in the European
    Company (SE), which were then largely taken up by the Luxembourg EU
    Presidency of the second half of 1997 in a new draft version of the Statute
    (EU9710158N [3]).

    [1] http://europa.eu.int/comm/employment_social/soc-dial/labour/davignon/davien.htm
    [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/davignon-group-on-worker-involvement-publishes-recommendations
    [3] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/labour-and-social-affairs-council-dominated-by-preparations-for-jobs-summit

  • Article
    27 januar 1998

    A survey of 374 organisations by the recruitment company, Reed Personnel,
    conducted prior to Christmas 1997, showed that the number of companies
    opening on Christmas Day has grown by a third over the past decade.
    Traditionally only organisations such as hospitals, the emergency services,
    hotels, telephone operator services and the media worked on Christmas Day,
    but this has now extended to the service sector in general and even to some
    manufacturing establishments. The service sector showed the largest increase
    in the proportion of establishments opening, up from 6% to 8% over the
    decade, while manufacturing rose from zero to 1%.

  • Article
    27 januar 1998

    Against the background of increasing mass unemployment, and following
    legislation in 1996, partial retirement (Altersteilzeit) has become a very
    prominent bargaining issue between the German social partners (DE9708224F
    [1]). According to a recent study by the Institute for Economics and Social
    Science (Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaftliches Institut, WSI) there are
    now 15 branch-level collective agreements and several company agreements on
    partial retirement covering altogether about 5 million employees.

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/social-policies-undefined/collective-agreements-on-partial-retirement

  • Article
    27 januar 1998

    At the 1995 congress of the Austrian Trade Union Federation
    (Österreichischer Gewerkschaftsbund, ÖGB) its member trade unions decided
    to reorganise. The goal is to reduce the number of individual trade unions
    from 14 to three, covering manufacturing, services, and public service. There
    is no clear time-limit for the process. In the first two years little was
    achieved by way of obvious results, but 1998 promises to bring the first of
    these. On 21 January 1998 two trade unions, the Union of Printing and Paper
    Workers (Gewerkschaft Druck und Papier) and the Union of Posts and
    Telecommunications Employees (Gewerkschaft der Post- und
    Fernmeldebediensteten) concluded a cooperation agreement. They are forming a
    jointly and proportionately financed platform to decide policy measures and a
    joint steering committee with proportional representation. The rationale is
    the unions' shared activity in the media sector. By 2000, they want to unite
    their offices in one location. A full merger in the future is not ruled out,
    neither is it explicitly planned. According to press reports, the ÖGB's
    president commented that a merger might have been the result if the ÖGB
    could have taken decisions like a joint stock company.

  • Article
    27 januar 1998

    Following demonstrations and work stoppages in December 1997, employers and
    trade unions in Belgium's not-for-profit sector have submitted a joint
    declaration to the Government calling for increased financing for employment.

Series

  • European Quality of Life Surveys

    The European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) is carried out every four to five years since its inception in 2003, with the latest edition in 2016. It examines both the objective circumstances of people's lives and how they feel about those circumstances and their lives in general. It covers issues around employment, income, education, housing, family, health and work–life balance. It also looks at subjective topics, such as people's levels of happiness and life satisfaction, and perceptions of the quality of society.

  • European Jobs Monitor

    This series brings together publications and other outputs of the European Jobs Monitor (EJM), which tracks structural change in European labour markets. The EJM analyses shifts in the employment structure in the EU in terms of occupation and sector and gives a qualitative assessment of these shifts using various proxies of job quality – wages, skill-levels, etc.

  • European Quality of Life Survey 2016

    Eurofound's European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) examines both the objective circumstances of European citizens' lives and how they feel about those circumstances and their lives in general. This series consists of outputs from the EQLS 2016, the fourth edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 2003. 

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2015

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2015, the sixth edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Working Conditions Survey 1996

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 1996, the second edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2001

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2001, which was an extension of the EWCS 2000 to cover the then 12 acceding and candidate countries. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2000

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2000, the third edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Company Survey 2004

    Eurofound’s European Company Survey (ECS) maps and analyses company policies and practices which can have an impact on smart, sustainable and inclusive growth, as well as the development of social dialogue in companies. This series consists of outputs from the first edition of the survey carried out in 2004–2005 under the name European Establishment Survey on Working Time and Work-Life Balance. 

  • European Company Survey 2009

    Eurofound’s European Company Survey (ECS) maps and analyses company policies and practices which can have an impact on smart, sustainable and inclusive growth, as well as the development of social dialogue in companies. This series consists of outputs from the ECS 2009, the second edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 2004–2005 as the European Establishment Survey on Working Time and Work-Life Balance. 

  • European Company Survey 2013

    Eurofound’s European Company Survey (ECS) maps and analyses company policies and practices which can have an impact on smart, sustainable and inclusive growth, as well as the development of social dialogue in companies. This series consists of outputs from the ECS 2013, the third edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 2004–2005 as the European Establishment Survey on Working Time and Work-Life Balance.

Forthcoming publications

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