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  • Article
    27 december 1997

    Dismissed trade union delegates and the management of Boston Scientific, a
    medical equipment company which relocated operations from Belgium to Ireland
    in 1997, are still fighting it out in the Belgian courts at the end of the
    year. This legal battle is part of a union strategy to fight closures and
    relocations carried out by multinationals.

  • Article
    27 december 1997

    The leaders of the Norwegian Federation of Trade Unions (LO) and the
    Federation of Norwegian Professional Associations (AF), Yngve Hågensen (LO)
    and Magne Songvoll (AF), made headlines on 1 December 1997 when they called
    for their members to boycott Norway's largest commercial bank, Den Norske
    Bank (DnB). This followed DnB's decision to introduce new service charges and
    to raise existing service charges from 1 November 1997. This is only the
    latest of many clashes between the trade unions and the banking sector in
    Norway on the issue of service charges. An opinion poll commissioned by LO
    and AF revealed that a majority of the people asked expressed dissatisfaction
    with existing service charges in the banking sector in general. The proposed
    boycott was not directed at the DnB alone, but the bank was made the main
    target due to its size and the scale of its service fees. DnB later
    reconsidered its original decision, and decided to lower charges on some
    services.

  • Article
    27 december 1997

    Developments in European Union (EU) and national-level policy with a direct
    impact on industrial relations were influenced by a number of key trends and
    events in 1997, many of which are set to continue to be of relevance in the
    policy debate in 1998:

  • Article
    27 december 1997

    The introduction of a statutory National Minimum Wage (NMW) was one of the
    commitments of the Labour Government that came to power in May 1997
    (UK9704125F [1]), and the National Minimum Wage Bill was published on 27
    November and received its first reading in Parliament. Margaret Beckett, the
    President of the Board of Trade, who is responsible for the bill, said that
    it would set the framework within which the Government would introduce the
    NMW, once it had carefully considered the recommendations of the Low Pay
    Commission [2] (LPC). The bill, she stated, will enable the Government to
    introduce a NMW which is as simple and universal as possible (UK9711177F
    [3]).

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/undefined-labour-market/the-industrial-relations-consequences-of-the-new-labour-government
    [2] http://www.dti.gov.uk/lowpay/
    [3] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/undefined-social-policies/the-national-minimum-wage-an-update

  • Article
    27 december 1997

    According to the Federal Statistical Office (Statistisches Bundesamt), German
    real GDP grew at a rate of 2.2% in 1997. As regards the Maastricht
    convergence criteria, the budget deficit reached 2.7% of GDP, whereas public
    debt amounted to 61.3% of GDP. On average, unemployment stood at 11.4% of the
    civilian labour force - 9.8% in the west and 18.1% in the east. Inflation, as
    measured by the consumer price index, amounted to 1.8%.

  • Article
    27 december 1997

    Strikes and demonstrations in December 1997 indicated that social unrest is
    rising in Belgium's care services sector, where workers feel threatened by
    budgetary cuts. Workers want to defend not only the volume but also the
    quality of employment in this sector.

  • Article
    27 december 1997

    During the spring of 1998, Norway's two-year pay agreements will be
    renegotiated. A tight labour market, increased public spending and reports of
    high wage increases amongst management has led to a certain uneasiness prior
    to the 1998 private sector pay settlement. The trade unions' strategy and
    claims for the 1998 settlement will not be decided upon before the general
    council of the Norwegian Confederation of Trade Unions' (LO) meets in
    February 1998. At this meeting, both the type of settlement and the main
    claims will be decided upon.

Series

  • European Quality of Life Surveys

    The European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) is carried out every four to five years since its inception in 2003, with the latest edition in 2016. It examines both the objective circumstances of people's lives and how they feel about those circumstances and their lives in general. It covers issues around employment, income, education, housing, family, health and work–life balance. It also looks at subjective topics, such as people's levels of happiness and life satisfaction, and perceptions of the quality of society.

  • European Jobs Monitor

    This series brings together publications and other outputs of the European Jobs Monitor (EJM), which tracks structural change in European labour markets. The EJM analyses shifts in the employment structure in the EU in terms of occupation and sector and gives a qualitative assessment of these shifts using various proxies of job quality – wages, skill-levels, etc.

  • European Quality of Life Survey 2016

    Eurofound's European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) examines both the objective circumstances of European citizens' lives and how they feel about those circumstances and their lives in general. This series consists of outputs from the EQLS 2016, the fourth edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 2003. 

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2015

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2015, the sixth edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Working Conditions Survey 1996

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 1996, the second edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2001

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2001, which was an extension of the EWCS 2000 to cover the then 12 acceding and candidate countries. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2000

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2000, the third edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Company Survey 2004

    Eurofound’s European Company Survey (ECS) maps and analyses company policies and practices which can have an impact on smart, sustainable and inclusive growth, as well as the development of social dialogue in companies. This series consists of outputs from the first edition of the survey carried out in 2004–2005 under the name European Establishment Survey on Working Time and Work-Life Balance. 

  • European Company Survey 2009

    Eurofound’s European Company Survey (ECS) maps and analyses company policies and practices which can have an impact on smart, sustainable and inclusive growth, as well as the development of social dialogue in companies. This series consists of outputs from the ECS 2009, the second edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 2004–2005 as the European Establishment Survey on Working Time and Work-Life Balance. 

  • European Company Survey 2013

    Eurofound’s European Company Survey (ECS) maps and analyses company policies and practices which can have an impact on smart, sustainable and inclusive growth, as well as the development of social dialogue in companies. This series consists of outputs from the ECS 2013, the third edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 2004–2005 as the European Establishment Survey on Working Time and Work-Life Balance.

Forthcoming publications