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  • Article
    27 december 1997

    Compulsory competitive tendering (CCT) was one of the key privatisation
    measures of the Conservative governments of 1979-97, which brought much
    insecurity into the lives of those who provided services to local
    authorities. Much to the joy of local authority workers and trade unions, in
    June 1997 the new Labour Government announced that the rules on CCT would be
    changed after a wide-ranging consultation exercise (UK9706141N [1]). On 21
    November 1997, local government minister Hilary Armstrong laid before
    Parliament new regulations which amend the existing framework for CCT to make
    it more flexible, and encourage local authorities to move to a "Best Value"
    based approach to service delivery, in which value to customers would take
    priority over competition per se. She said: "In due course we will be
    replacing CCT with a new legislative framework on Best Value. In the
    meantime, I want local authorities to develop Best Value ahead of primary
    legislation."

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/government-relaxes-compulsory-competitive-tendering-rules

  • Article
    27 december 1997

    A confidential interim report into industrial and employee relations in An
    Post, Ireland's state-owned postal company, highlights the adversarial nature
    of its industrial relations structures and practices and how these are
    inhibiting the development of a more customer focused business. The report,
    which was submitted to the company's chair, Stephen O'Connor, in February
    1997 was carried out by a subsidiary of the Irish Business and Employers
    Confederation (IBEC) - Employee Relations Services (ERS). It was featured in
    the industrial relations weekly, /Industrial Relations News/, in December
    1997.

  • Article
    27 december 1997

    Luxembourg has continued to experience a period of economic growth. The
    public debt accounted for 6.7% of GDP in 1997, and projections for 1998 are
    in the order of 7.7%. Eurostat calculates a public spending surplus of 1.7%
    in 1997 and the state budget for 1998 is virtually balanced. The population
    is 418,300 (of whom 142,800 are foreigners), while total employment stood at
    224,000 at the end of 1997, of whom 63,200 are cross-border workers.
    Unemployment is rising slowly and stood at 3.6% at the end of 1997. The rate
    of inflation was 1.4% in 1997.

  • Article
    27 december 1997

    The leaders of the Norwegian Federation of Trade Unions (LO) and the
    Federation of Norwegian Professional Associations (AF), Yngve Hågensen (LO)
    and Magne Songvoll (AF), made headlines on 1 December 1997 when they called
    for their members to boycott Norway's largest commercial bank, Den Norske
    Bank (DnB). This followed DnB's decision to introduce new service charges and
    to raise existing service charges from 1 November 1997. This is only the
    latest of many clashes between the trade unions and the banking sector in
    Norway on the issue of service charges. An opinion poll commissioned by LO
    and AF revealed that a majority of the people asked expressed dissatisfaction
    with existing service charges in the banking sector in general. The proposed
    boycott was not directed at the DnB alone, but the bank was made the main
    target due to its size and the scale of its service fees. DnB later
    reconsidered its original decision, and decided to lower charges on some
    services.

  • Article
    27 december 1997

    Dismissed trade union delegates and the management of Boston Scientific, a
    medical equipment company which relocated operations from Belgium to Ireland
    in 1997, are still fighting it out in the Belgian courts at the end of the
    year. This legal battle is part of a union strategy to fight closures and
    relocations carried out by multinationals.

  • Article
    27 november 1997

    Austria's current pensions reform aims to reduce the level of early
    retirement. However, since the late 1970s, early retirement has been serving
    as the main means to reduce the labour market participation rate among older
    workers and thus make room for younger workers who would otherwise have been
    unemployed. With early retirement now being squeezed, the social partners and
    the Government have been looking for other measures to keep the participation
    rate among older workers, and thus unemployment, at a relatively low level. A
    new device - in the Austrian context - is a greater use of part-time work,
    especially among men, which does not take workers off the labour market
    altogether but reduces their hours of presence within it. As part of this
    effort, the Government and the social partners agreed in November 1997 to
    create, by law, the so-called "solidarity premium model"
    (Solidaritätsprämienmodell).

  • Article
    27 november 1997

    A study recently published by the Ministry for Qualification and Employment
    reveals that between 1974 and 1995 there was a sharp drop in union membership
    in Portugal.

  • Article
    27 november 1997

    "Personnel secondment "(personaluthyrning) is the Swedish term for the
    situation whereby persons under an employment contract with one firm are
    leased to work in another firm. It covers arrangements known variously as
    hiring-out of labour or temporary agency work in other countries. The
    practice was deregulated in Sweden in 1991 and has since increased
    considerably. This led to the Social Democratic Government appointing a
    commission in July 1996 to evaluate and analyse the consequences of the 1993
    Act on private employment agencies and secondment of personnel. The
    commission was headed by Björn Rosengren, former president of the
    white-collar workers trade union federation, TCO. The Act of 1993, which was
    designed by the then non-socialist government, removed the requirement that a
    firm had to have a licence to be allowed to lease workers. Previously such
    licences had been given to very few firms. The new Act contains only two
    restrictive provisions: that the employee must not be restrained from
    accepting employment in the client enterprise; and that a person who has left
    his or her employment to work for a leasing firm must not be leased to his or
    her previous employer until at least six months have passed.

Series

  • European Quality of Life Surveys

    The European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) is carried out every four to five years since its inception in 2003, with the latest edition in 2016. It examines both the objective circumstances of people's lives and how they feel about those circumstances and their lives in general. It covers issues around employment, income, education, housing, family, health and work–life balance. It also looks at subjective topics, such as people's levels of happiness and life satisfaction, and perceptions of the quality of society.

  • European Jobs Monitor

    This series brings together publications and other outputs of the European Jobs Monitor (EJM), which tracks structural change in European labour markets. The EJM analyses shifts in the employment structure in the EU in terms of occupation and sector and gives a qualitative assessment of these shifts using various proxies of job quality – wages, skill-levels, etc.

  • European Quality of Life Survey 2016

    Eurofound's European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) examines both the objective circumstances of European citizens' lives and how they feel about those circumstances and their lives in general. This series consists of outputs from the EQLS 2016, the fourth edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 2003. 

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2015

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2015, the sixth edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Working Conditions Survey 1996

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 1996, the second edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2001

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2001, which was an extension of the EWCS 2000 to cover the then 12 acceding and candidate countries. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2000

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2000, the third edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Company Survey 2004

    Eurofound’s European Company Survey (ECS) maps and analyses company policies and practices which can have an impact on smart, sustainable and inclusive growth, as well as the development of social dialogue in companies. This series consists of outputs from the first edition of the survey carried out in 2004–2005 under the name European Establishment Survey on Working Time and Work-Life Balance. 

  • European Company Survey 2009

    Eurofound’s European Company Survey (ECS) maps and analyses company policies and practices which can have an impact on smart, sustainable and inclusive growth, as well as the development of social dialogue in companies. This series consists of outputs from the ECS 2009, the second edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 2004–2005 as the European Establishment Survey on Working Time and Work-Life Balance. 

  • European Company Survey 2013

    Eurofound’s European Company Survey (ECS) maps and analyses company policies and practices which can have an impact on smart, sustainable and inclusive growth, as well as the development of social dialogue in companies. This series consists of outputs from the ECS 2013, the third edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 2004–2005 as the European Establishment Survey on Working Time and Work-Life Balance.

Forthcoming publications