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  • Article
    27 februar 1997

    On 4 February, following a mediation proposal by the Government, the national
    metalworking collective agreement was signed. Negotiations had lasted for
    nine months and were marked by moments of breakdown and conflict which
    resulted in strikes. The metalworking settlement, which covers some 1.5
    million workers, is Italy's most important industry-wide agreement. It will
    strongly influence both the forthcoming renewals of contracts in other
    sectors and the evaluation of the July 1993 tripartite central agreement on
    incomes policy and collective bargaining structure, planned for June 1997.

  • Article
    27 februar 1997

    One of the continuing quarrels between the Social Democrat Government and the
    largest trade union confederation, the Confederation of Trade Unions for
    Blue-Collar Workers (Landsorganisationen or LO), appears to have been settled
    by an agreement on the overall features of the unemployment insurance system,
    presented on 12 February. Formally, the Government is not involved in the
    settlement, but the details of the settlement were presented in a press
    release from the Ministry of Labour and in person by the Minister of Labour,
    Margareta Winberg, together with LO's vice-president, Wanja Lundby-Wedin.

  • Article
    27 februar 1997

    In February, the Communication Workers' Union (CWU) launched a consultative
    paper aimed at influencing the pre-election commitments of both the
    Conservative Party and Labour Party. The union, which is firmly against
    privatisation of the Post Office, has called for legislation to turn it into
    an independent corporation, with the level of dividends pegged at 40% of
    post-tax profits. The union feels that its proposals will have equal appeal
    to all political parties because of the weight of public opinion opposing
    privatisation.

  • Article
    27 februar 1997

    On 21 February 1997, theMinistry of Finance and the Danish Central Federation
    of State Employees (CFU) signed a new collective agreement for the period
    1997-9, covering 225,000 government employees. The parties agreed on a total
    4.25% increase, of which 2.9% is to be allocated for a general pay rise, and
    1.35% for pensions and other purposes. Additionally, a wage adjustment scheme
    has been introduced to take account of private sector increases

  • Article
    27 februar 1997

    On 31 January 1997, the Second National Agreement on Temporary Employment
    Agencies was signed. This is the second agreement reached in this sector
    since the activity of temporary employment agencies (TEAs) in Spain was
    approved in 1994. It will remain in force until 31 December 1999.

  • Article
    27 februar 1997

    The European Commission has recently published its report on progress made in
    the implementation of equitable wage policies since 1993. The aim of
    providing all employees with an equitable wage was enshrined in the Charter
    of the Fundamental Social Rights of Workers, which was adopted by 11 member
    states (with the exception of the UK) in 1989. In accordance with the 1989
    social Action Programme, the Commission published an Opinion in 1993, which
    stated that the pursuit of an equitable wage must be seen as part of the
    general drive to achieve higher productivity and employment creation, and to
    foster good relations between the two sides of industry. The member states
    were encouraged to give substance to their commitment made in adopting the
    Social Charter, by working towards the establishment of an equitable wages
    policy. This was to be achieved through greater labour market transparency
    with regard to wages. The social partners were also called upon to contribute
    to the achievement of this aim.

  • Article
    27 februar 1997

    The central social partners - the Austrian Trade Union Confederation
    (Österreichischer Gewerkschaftsbund,ÖGB) and the Austrian Chamber of
    Commerce (Wirtschaftskammer Österreich, WKÖ), the statutory body grouping
    almost all nonagricultural enterprises - have for some time been discussing a
    range of changes to the 1969 Working Time Law (Arbeitszeitgesetz, AZG). The
    aim is to maintain competitiveness and employment by making possible a more
    uneven distribution of working hours over time, without financial penalty to
    the employer. This is expected to lead to higher productivity, better use of
    plant, lower inventories, and a capability to respond more swiftly to
    variations in demand. The trade unions also hope to achieve a reduction of
    hours worked by individual employees in favour of more employment.

  • Article
    27 februar 1997

    In a context of increasingly difficult youth employment in France, and of
    social tension about what course of action to take, a recent national
    conference has defined a number of concrete objectives. These seek to secure
    employment for the most disadvantaged, and to expose students to the world of
    work for the first time. These aims are based on a series of commitments on
    the part of industry, Government and the social partners - who remain at odds
    in their analysis - the effects of which must be monitored.

  • Article
    27 februar 1997

    Declining union membership and a legal and ideological attack on the role of
    trade unions over the past 17 years may have left many with the opinion that
    employees no longer value the right to act collectively. It has been argued
    that the attack on the unions throughout the 1980s and 1990s has left the
    unions weak and unable to protect members' rights. Alternatively, it has been
    argued that people now prefer to negotiate their own employment contracts
    individually and do not need trade unions.

  • Article
    27 februar 1997

    Industrial action has accompanied trade unions' pay demands in Spain's public
    administration since late 1996, and the threat of further action has been
    made if negotiations are not started immediately.

Series

  • European Quality of Life Surveys

    The European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) is carried out every four to five years since its inception in 2003, with the latest edition in 2016. It examines both the objective circumstances of people's lives and how they feel about those circumstances and their lives in general. It covers issues around employment, income, education, housing, family, health and work–life balance. It also looks at subjective topics, such as people's levels of happiness and life satisfaction, and perceptions of the quality of society.

  • European Jobs Monitor

    This series brings together publications and other outputs of the European Jobs Monitor (EJM), which tracks structural change in European labour markets. The EJM analyses shifts in the employment structure in the EU in terms of occupation and sector and gives a qualitative assessment of these shifts using various proxies of job quality – wages, skill-levels, etc.

  • European Quality of Life Survey 2016

    Eurofound's European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) examines both the objective circumstances of European citizens' lives and how they feel about those circumstances and their lives in general. This series consists of outputs from the EQLS 2016, the fourth edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 2003. 

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2015

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2015, the sixth edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Working Conditions Survey 1996

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 1996, the second edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2001

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2001, which was an extension of the EWCS 2000 to cover the then 12 acceding and candidate countries. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2000

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2000, the third edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Company Survey 2004

    Eurofound’s European Company Survey (ECS) maps and analyses company policies and practices which can have an impact on smart, sustainable and inclusive growth, as well as the development of social dialogue in companies. This series consists of outputs from the first edition of the survey carried out in 2004–2005 under the name European Establishment Survey on Working Time and Work-Life Balance. 

  • European Company Survey 2009

    Eurofound’s European Company Survey (ECS) maps and analyses company policies and practices which can have an impact on smart, sustainable and inclusive growth, as well as the development of social dialogue in companies. This series consists of outputs from the ECS 2009, the second edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 2004–2005 as the European Establishment Survey on Working Time and Work-Life Balance. 

  • European Company Survey 2013

    Eurofound’s European Company Survey (ECS) maps and analyses company policies and practices which can have an impact on smart, sustainable and inclusive growth, as well as the development of social dialogue in companies. This series consists of outputs from the ECS 2013, the third edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 2004–2005 as the European Establishment Survey on Working Time and Work-Life Balance.

Forthcoming publications