Platform economy database

Eurofound’s platform economy database provides information on publications, articles, court cases, initiatives and other outputs related to platform work, or those forms of work that are organised and mediated through online platforms (websites and apps). This resource provides metadata for each entry, such as the name of the author, year of publication, whether it concerns an open access or subscription-based material, a brief description of the content and where available a web link to a source from which eligible users may access content.

This article evaluates the job quality of work in the remote gig economy. Such work consists of the remote provision of a wide variety of digital services mediated by online labour platforms. Focusing on workers in Southeast Asia and...

5 February 2018 - Workers who deliver food at home: "We are not autonomous, give us a contract". The rider can not do without it. While talking he looks, compulsively, at the smartphone. "It has become an obsession," he admits. For...

This article analyses the ways in which creative crowdwork is managed and controlled within social and economic power relations. It presents findings from a research project on creative crowdworkers focussing on aspects of management...

Anyone who has ever felt trapped in a cubicle, annoyed by a micromanaging boss, or fed up with office politics has probably dreamed of leaving it all behind and going it alone. The intensifying demands of corporate life are making this...

Gig economy platforms seem to provide extreme temporal flexibility to workers, giving them full control over how to spend each hour and minute of the day. What constraints do workers face when attempting to exercise this flexibility? We...

Work and careers are becoming increasingly market-based, entrepreneurial, and precarious – in a word, unstructured. This presents challenges to organization theory, which is largely predicated on the structures of post-WW2 Western...

The gig economy has so far proved hard to define, hard to measure and hard to interpret. Some see it as part of a general shift of work towards less secure and more exploitative employment; others see it as creating a new form of...