Publications

Search results: 964 items found
  • Newsletter
    3 Februar 2006

    The February 2006 issue of Communiqué contains the following articles: Director's diary; Your work, your life: matching company needs with worker solutions; High level of business creation activities in the new Member States; In Brief; Latest events and publications.

  • Article
    30 Januar 2006

    Late 2005 and early 2006 has seen conflict and negotiations over how 1,000
    surplus white-collar staff are to be made redundant at Fiat, the Italian
    motor manufacturing group. Fiat management and trade union have asked for the
    workers, mostly aged over 50, to be placed on a 'long mobility' scheme,
    providing income support until they reach retirement age, while the
    government has proposed a special programme of labour market reintegration.

  • Article
    30 Januar 2006

    On 11 January 2006, the Grand Chamber of the European Court of Human Rights
    in Strasbourg convened to deliver the Court's long-awaited judgment [1] in
    the case of /Sørensen & Rasmussen v Denmark/ (applications nos. 52562/99 and
    52620/99). The question at issue was whether it is a violation of Article 11
    of the Council of Europe's European Convention on Human Rights and
    Fundamental Freedoms [2] to prevent people from obtaining employment if they
    refuse to be a members of a trade union that has concluded a closed-shop
    agreement with the enterprise in question - in other words, Danish
    closed-shop agreements were being put definitively to the test.

    [1] http://cmiskp.echr.coe.int/tkp197/view.asp?item=57&portal=hbkm&action=html&highlight=&sessionid=5574766&skin=hudoc-en
    [2] http://conventions.coe.int/treaty/en/Treaties/Html/005.htm

  • Article
    29 Januar 2006

    On 26 November 2005, Slovenia's four strongest trade union confederations -
    the Union of Free Trade Unions of Slovenia (Zveza svobodnih sindikatov
    Slovenije, ZSSS [1]), KNSS - Independence, the Confederation of New Trade
    Unions of Slovenia (KNSS - Neodvisnost, Konfederacija novih sindikatov
    Slovenije, KNSS), the Confederation of Trade Unions of Slovenia Pergam
    (Konfederacija sindikatov Pergam Slovenije, Pergam) and the Confederation of
    Trade Unions ΄90 of Slovenia (Konfederacija sindikatov '90 Slovenije,
    Konfederacija '90) - together with 15 significant autonomous sectoral trade
    unions (mainly white-collar unions organising workers in specific sectors and
    occupations) (SI0210102F [2]) organised major demonstrations against the
    centre-right government’s reform programme. These were the biggest
    demonstrations held since Slovenian independence. The unions concerned
    organise 95% of all trade union members in Slovenia. According to the
    organisers, around 40,000 people took part in the demonstrations, which were
    held under the slogan 'For the preservation of the social state in Slovenia'.

    [1] http://www.zsss.si/
    [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/the-development-and-current-situation-of-trade-unions-3

  • Article
    29 Januar 2006

    After about three months of negotiations, bargaining over a new collective
    agreement for power station workers between the Energy Employers’
    Association (Energiföretagarnas Arbetsgivarförening, EFA) and the Swedish
    Electricians’ Union (Svenska Elektrikerförbundet, SEF) broke down on 11
    November 2005. The major stumbling block was not pay, but acceptance of a
    joint recommendation to their member organisations agreed by the Swedish
    Confederation of Trade Unions (Landsorganisationen, LO) and the Confederation
    of Swedish Enterprise (Svenskt Näringsliv) on 30 August 2005 (SE0509102F
    [1]). This recommendation concerns the employment conditions that should
    apply to foreign companies operating in Sweden and bringing their own workers
    with them. It includes a provision that such foreign employers may take out
    temporary membership (for up to one year) in the relevant sectoral employers'
    association - EFA, in the case of the power industry. The recommendations
    were to be implemented in collective agreements in the whole private sector
    by 31 October 2005, and most LO-affiliated trade unions and member employers'
    associations of the Confederation of Swedish Enterprise did so during autumn
    2005.

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/social-partners-agree-on-treatment-of-foreign-employers-in-sweden

  • Article
    29 Januar 2006

    Following lengthy negotiations and workforce mobilisations, in December 2005
    Spain's SEAT motor company signed an agreement with the UGT and CC.OO trade
    unions that aims to tackle current problems at the firm though various
    measures, including the redundancy of 660 workers out of a workforce of some
    13,000. The signatories see the deal as a comprise to avoid greater evils.
    However, the agreement has proved controversial.

  • Article
    25 Januar 2006

    Contributions to compulsory insurance funds (for unemployment, sickness,
    health, accidents, old age and disability insurance) - which are divided
    between employers and employees by a ratio three to one - are generally
    considered to be high. Taking into account the contributions of employers as
    well as employees, the total rate of these levies is fixed at 48.6%
    (self-employed persons pay almost the same rate at 47.15%). Therefore,
    employers in particular require that their contribution rate be lowered. The
    government is also interested in decreasing the insurance burden while
    maintaining the present insurance system. In the field of sickness insurance,
    there is some room for lowering insurance rates because the Social Insurance
    Company (Sociálna poisťovňa, SP) has a surplus of income from insurance
    benefits relative to the sickness benefits that it pays out.

  • Article
    25 Januar 2006

    The recent good financial performance of KGHM, a major Polish copper
    producer, has prompted employees to seek a share of the increased profits. In
    December 2005, the Copper Industry Workers Trade Union (ZZPPM) initiated a
    collective dispute, calling for a 10% general pay increase and the
    reallocation of a third of the workforce to higher pay brackets.