Publications

Search results: 964 items found
  • Article
    24 Januar 2006

    On 19 December 2005, the Estonian Employers’ Confederation (Eesti
    Tööandjate Keskliit, ETTK [1]) (EE0310102F [2]) and the Confederation of
    Estonian Trade Unions (Eesti Ametiühingute Keskliit, EAKL [3]) (EE0308101F
    [4]) signed an agreement on the national minimum wage rate for 2006. This
    agreement raises the monthly minimum wage by about 11.5% to EEK 3,000 (up
    from EEK 2,690 in 2005). The minimum hourly wage will increase to EEK 17.80
    from EEK 15.90. According to the Wages Act [5], the national minimum wage is
    determined annually by government decree after the central organisations of
    trade unions and employers have reached consensus about its level for the
    next year. Pursuant to the Collective Agreements Act [6] (EE0309102F [7]),
    the national minimum wage is compulsory for all employees working in Estonia
    and to all employers as defined in the Employment Contracts Act [8]
    (EE0309101N [9]).

    [1] http://www.ettk.ee/
    [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/the-development-and-current-situation-of-employers-organisations-1
    [3] http://www.eakl.ee/
    [4] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/the-development-and-current-situation-of-trade-unions
    [5] http://www.legaltext.ee/text/en/X1037K6.htm
    [6] http://www.legaltext.ee/text/en/X2002K4.htm
    [7] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/collective-bargaining-examined
    [8] http://www.legaltext.ee/text/en/X1056K10.htm
    [9] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/social-partners-discuss-new-employment-contracts-act

  • Article
    24 Januar 2006

    On 12 January 2006, the coalition government of the conservative People’s
    Party (Österreichische Volkspartei, ÖVP) and the populist Alliance for the
    Future of Austria (Bündnis Zukunft Österreich, BZÖ) agreed on the partial
    privatisation of the Austrian Post Company (Österreichische Post AG). The
    cabinet empowered the state public holding company (Österreichische
    Industrieholding AG, ÖIAG) to sell off (ie privatise) up to 49% of its state
    shares in Österreichische Post - which is currently entirely state-owned -
    on the stock exchange in 2006. The ÖIAG was initially established by law as
    a holding concern to administer and manage the companies completely or
    partially owned by the state. However, in the mid-1990s, this institution
    changed from an operating concern holding a set of shares in state-owned
    companies to an executive privatisation agency, whose main role is to carry
    out the privatisation of all these firms on behalf of the government
    (AT0312204F [1]).

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/steel-producers-fully-privatised

  • Article
    22 Januar 2006

    The Research Institute of Labour and Social Affairs [1] carried out an
    analysis on motivations for good work performance under a project entitled
    ‘Measuring the Quality of Working Life’ (CZ0502SR01 [2]). The results are
    based on an extensive employee survey, which was conducted in October 2004.

    [1] http://www.rilsa.cz/E-ZAKLAD.htm
    [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/undefined/quality-of-working-life-in-the-czech-republic

  • Case study
    18 Januar 2006

    In September 1994, the Council of Ministers decided on a Directive on the establishment of a European Works Council for the purposes of informing and consulting employees (94/45/EC). The emergence of European Works Councils (EWCs) is a major part of the development of an industrial relations system at European level. The agreement for the establishment of the EADS EWC and its derived committees for information and consultation of the workforce was signed in Amsterdam on 23 October 2000 by three human resources directors and five French representatives, five German representatives from DASA’s EWC, two Spanish representatives and one from the UK.

  • Article
    17 Januar 2006

    A study developed between October 2000 and July 2004 analysed the results of
    a survey carried out among a number of Portuguese companies in the
    information and communication technologies (ICT) and the retail trade
    sectors. One of the findings of this study is that the female workers
    experienced more difficulties in terms of work-life balance than male
    workers, and that this was particularly the case among women with less
    qualified occupations, lower wages and worse contractual situations.

  • Article
    17 Januar 2006

    A diverse picture emerges regarding trends in quality of work in the
    Netherlands. It is difficult to draw firm conclusions on trends in working
    conditions because previously existing surveys have been replaced by newer
    ones. Nonetheless, work pace appears to be stabilising, while time pressure
    is decreasing. Some traditional risks, such as noise, dangerous work,
    physical load and shift work, are also stabilising; other risks, such as
    dirty work and bad smells at work, have declined. Contractual working hours
    have been reduced. At the same time, there is increased autonomy in decision
    making, and (paid and particularly unpaid) overtime is also on the rise.

  • Other
    17 Januar 2006

    One in four employed persons in Sweden has suffered from a work-related disorder in the past 12 months, according to the latest Swedish Work-related disorders survey. This survey data report focuses on disorders resulting from occupational accidents, stress and ergonomic factors. It identifies the most common ailments affecting men and women, outlines the occupations most at risk, examines sickness absence rates, and considers the problem of under-reporting.

  • Article
    12 Januar 2006

    Since 1996, the Danish Working Environment Authority [1] has been working
    under the government sponsored programme Clean Working Environment 2005
    (135Kb pdf) [2] (Rent arbejdsmiljø 2005 [3]). As the programme has now come
    to an end, a new programme, for the period 2005-2010, has to be decided upon.
    In light of this, the Danish Working Environment Authority, in cooperation
    with the National Institute of Occupational Health [4] and the National Board
    of Industrial Injuries [5], published the report ‘ Fremtidens arbejdsmiljø
    [6]’ (Working environment of the future). The report aims at providing a
    solid foundation for deciding which working environment risk factors should
    be focused upon, and for setting out the general goals for preventive
    occupational health and safety activities.

    [1] http://www.at.dk/sw7737.asp
    [2] http://www.at.dk/graphics/at/engelsk-pdf/andre-informationsmaterialer/2005-handlingsprogram-uk.pdf
    [3] http://www.at.dk/sw275.asp
    [4] http://www.ami.dk/?lang=en
    [5] http://www.ask.dk/in_english/
    [6] http://www.at.dk/sw13773.asp

  • Report
    12 Januar 2006

    This study focuses on a sample of six European countries – France, Germany, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom. These cover a wide spectrum of the potential societal systems, with variations in labour market characteristics, welfare state regimes, gender relations, level of participation and working time patterns. As the selected countries diverge significantly in terms of social protection systems, working time and gender regimes, they illustrate the impact of the institutional structure on the gender division of paid work and income development over the life course.

  • Article
    11 Januar 2006

    One in four employed persons in Sweden has suffered from a work-related
    disorder in the past 12 months, according to the latest Swedish Work-related
    disorders survey. This survey data report focuses on disorders resulting from
    occupational accidents, stress and ergonomic factors. It identifies the most
    common ailments affecting men and women, outlines the occupations most at
    risk, examines sickness absence rates, and considers the problem of
    under-reporting.