Publications

Search results: 964 items found
  • Article
    10 Januar 2006

    On 20 December 2005, the Estonian Employees’ Unions’ Confederation (Eesti
    Teenistujate Ametiliitude Keskorganisatsioon, TALO [1]) (EE0308101F [2]) and
    the government signed a wage agreement for the year 2006. TALO represents
    employees working in the fields of education, culture, media, agriculture,
    sports, science, technology and healthcare. The minimum wage for a TALO
    member with higher education who works full-time in a position requiring
    higher education, is EEK 6,500 per month since January 2006 (up from EEK
    5,960 in 2005) (EE0501103N [3]). Compared to 2005, the rise in the overall
    wage fund for 2006 is in different spheres on average 10%, taking into
    account the rise in the budget volume of different ministries. The parties
    agreed to handle the minimum wage provisions as a collective agreement and it
    will be registered in the Register of collective agreements. Handling an
    agreement as collective agreement means that the members of TALO should keep
    an industrial peace.

    [1] http://www.talo.ee/
    [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/the-development-and-current-situation-of-trade-unions
    [3] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/two-major-minimum-wage-agreements-signed

  • Article
    10 Januar 2006

    The German-owned discount supermarket chain, Lidl, has concluded a collective
    agreement with the United Federation of Workers (Fagligt Fælles Forbund,
    3F). Commentators argue that this would appear to challenge Lidl's reputation
    in Denmark as having a poor staff policy and paying low wages - it has often
    been accused of trying to copy the model of the US-owned Wal-Mart, which has
    a very difficult relationship with trade unions. But on 4 January 2006, Lidl
    concluded an agreement with 3F covering 50 warehouse workers working in the
    chain’s first big central warehouse in Kolding (Jutland). Lidl has more
    than 6,000 stores in a number of European countries.

  • Article
    10 Januar 2006

    On 15 December 2005, the Federal Labour Court (Bundesarbeitsgericht, BAG)
    ruled [1] that employers have to pay recent, collectively agreed wage
    increases even if they left the employers’ association before the
    collective agreement was finalised . This rule applies to all individual
    employment contracts that, for their working conditions and wage rates, rely
    on those in the 'most recently agreed collective standards' provided that the
    individual employment contract was concluded after 1 January 2002. Whereas
    the unions welcomed the BAG’s judgment, employers’ associations heavily
    criticised the ruling.

    [1] http://juris.bundesarbeitsgericht.de/cgi-bin/rechtsprechung/document.py?Gericht=bag&Art=pm&Datum=2005&Sort=3&nr=10752&anz=81&pos=4&Frame=2

  • Article
    10 Januar 2006

    On 7 December 2005, the Supreme Court of Justice (Oberster Gerichtshof, OGH)
    formally terminated a pending conflict over the service regulations of
    Austria’s largest bank institute, the Bank Austria-Creditanstalt (BA-CA),
    by pronouncing its decision in favour of the employer’s side.

  • Article
    9 Januar 2006

    In the autumn of 2005, ballots of the memberships of NATFHE - The University
    & College Lecturers’ Union and the Association of University Teachers (AUT)
    were held to seek endorsement of proposals for the amalgamation of the two
    unions to form a new organisation, the University and College Union (UCU). In
    December 2005, it was announced that the merger had been supported by 95.7%
    of NATFHE members and 79.2% of AUT members who voted.

  • Article
    9 Januar 2006

    The international activities of Nordic trade unions have been examined in a
    questionnaire survey carried out by the Norwegian research institute, Fafo.
    The survey involves trade unions from Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and
    Sweden. All unions in these countries with more than 1,000 members received a
    questionnaire in 2002-3, and approximately two-thirds responded. The majority
    of these unions reported that they in some way or another engage in
    international activities. The survey report, published in 2005, examines the
    areas in which the unions are active, the time and resources spent on such
    activities, and the challenges and barriers to international trade union
    activity (Internasjonalisering og fagorganisering En undersøkelse av de
    nordiske fagforbundenes internasjonale arbeid [1], Kristine Nergaard and Jon
    Erik Dølvik, SALTSA Report No 2:2005 in cooperation with Fafo).

    [1] http://ebib.arbetslivsinstitutet.se/saltsa/2005/wlr2005_02.pdf

  • Article
    9 Januar 2006

    An important element of the Hungarian industrial relations system is that the
    tripartite National Interest Reconciliation Council (Országos
    Érdekegyeztető Tanács, OÉT) sets annually the national minimum wage and
    issues to lower-level bargaining parties a recommendation for wage increases.
    The annual round of negotiations between the government, employers’
    associations and trade unions is one of the key fields for the social
    partners to influence macroeconomic and labour market processes (HU0502105F
    [1]).

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/activities-of-national-tripartite-body-in-2004-reviewed

  • Article
    9 Januar 2006

    The European Commission has designated 2006 as the European Year of
    workers’ mobility. The Commission hopes to use this Year of workers’
    mobility to highlight the importance of encouraging and enhancing the
    mobility of workers in the EU, stressing the benefits that this can bring to
    workers and the European economy in general. It also hopes to stimulate
    debate on the benefits and challenges to individual workers of changing jobs
    and/or working abroad.

  • Article
    9 Januar 2006

    At the beginning of December 2005, state secretary Alfred Finz of the
    conservative People’s Party (Österreichische Volkspartei, ÖVP) announced
    the government’s willingness to abolish the traditional public employment
    relationship of career public servants (Beamte). According to Mr Finz, the
    government plans to present a draft bill for a Federal Public Employees Act
    (Bundesmitarbeitergesetz) early in 2006. This draft will provide for only a
    single, uniform type of employment relationship between public employees and
    their employer. Thus, the current two-tier system in the civil service, which
    is based on a differentiation between career public servants and 'contract
    public employees' (Vertragsbedienstete) would be abolished (see below).

  • Article
    8 Januar 2006

    /Performing arts are classified within the broader sector of recreation,
    sports and culture. The first of three articles in the Sector Futures series
    on this sector delineates the performing arts industry sector and examines
    its market size, structure and nature of employment. It then discusses some
    of the main trends and drivers affecting the sector, as well as the principal
    issues and uncertainties related to performing arts./