EurWORK European Observatory of Working Life

National working life surveys

These Research in Focus articles are summaries of national working life survey findings. Results from these surveys provide an interesting complement to the results of Eurofound’s own European working conditions surveys and company surveys. These national articles (formerly also known as ‘survey data reports’) can be read in conjunction with the Eurofound 2014 report on ‘National working conditions surveys in Europe.’ Further international working life survey findings are available.

  • Norway: Improving gender balance in management posts

    While Norway has a good record on equal opportunities for women, the proportion of women in management is relatively low. A new report on the issue concludes that a gender-neutral approach rather than initiatives aimed at women only seems to be more successful in achieving gender balance.

  • Germany: Latest findings from DGB Good Work Index

    The German Confederation of Trade Unions (DGB) introduced the DGB Good Work Index in 2007 as a measurement tool, based on data from an annual survey, for monitoring quality of work. This article describes the background to the DGB Good Work Index, the most recent findings and the debate around the Index.

  • Estonia: Industrial relations and occupational health and safety – second Work Life Survey 2015

    In 2015, the second Estonian Work Life Survey was conducted by Statistics Estonia. This article describes some of the results of the survey, focusing on industrial relations and occupational health. The results showed that the collective agreement coverage rate as well as the level of employee representation is very low, as is employee awareness about the existence of their representatives.

  • Czech Republic: Transformations in the quality of working life

    Findings from a recent survey aim to capture national developments in the Czech Republic in the quality of working life. Results from the survey on the nature of work, job security, workers’ experiences of stress and its intensity, and the evaluation of different aspects of work are highlighted in this article.

  • Finland: Survey findings underline need for innovation in workplaces

    A national survey of well-being at work concludes that only one in four Finnish workplaces can be seen as innovative. A policy report based on the survey identifies a number of ways in which the quality of working life could be improved, such as more systematic innovative thinking, better change management and wider use of new technology.

  • Finland: Working Life Barometer 2013

    The Finnish Working Life Barometer is a survey of working conditions from the perspective of employees, conducted annually by the Ministry of Employment and the Economy since 1992. The focus of this article is the 2013 Barometer. It offers a summary of the main findings and an overview of the current issues.

  • Italy: Work climate improves while job satisfaction declines

    The third Quality of work survey report, published by Italy’s National Research Institute for Vocational Education and Training Employment and Social Policies (Isfol), provides both synthetic indicators and an accurate overview of the quality of work in Italy. It shows that while the work climate is still good, job satisfaction is still relatively low because of poor rewards and poor work prospects.

  • EU Level: Undeclared work in the EU

    This survey data report examines the main findings on the supply side of undeclared work around the EU based on a Special Eurobarometer survey carried out in 2013. The report examines the survey methodology, the concept of undeclared work, the characteristics of those supplying goods and services on an undeclared basis, the types of work activities that are undeclared, and income levels from undeclared work, including the extent of the practice of offering cash in hand.

  • Estonia: Evaluating employment rights awareness

    Legislation covering employment relations in Estonia was reformed in 2009 and, three years later, the Employment contract act survey was carried out to evaluate how this new policy had been implemented. The survey analyses employees’ and employers’ awareness of their rights in employment relations and the implementation of the minimum conditions (provided for in the act) to ensure employment protection and quality. Employees’ satisfaction and their willingness to pay for an unemployment safety net were also studied.

  • Bulgaria: Job satisfaction in light of poor economic outlook

    The Institute for Social and Trade Union Research conducted national surveys on work climate in 2010 and 2012. The subsequent report, presented in 2013, provides a comparative analysis of the job satisfaction of employees, and those who are self-employed, with issues such as job security, pay, training, career development, management style, and their social and psychological climate, working time, work-life balance, stress and representation.

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