Publications

Search results: 917 items found
  • Article
    27 Δεκέμβριος 1999

    The boards of directors of Orkla ASA decided in 1999 to offer Orkla shares at
    a 20% discount to all the company's employees in Norway and those of its
    subsidiaries in Denmark, Finland and Sweden- a total of 18,850 people. Orkla
    is one of the largest listed companies in Norway, with core businesses of
    branded consumer goods, chemicals and financial investments.

  • Article
    27 Δεκέμβριος 1999

    The Norwegian parliament (Stortinget) approved in December 1999 new
    regulations on private employment agencies and the leasing of labour [1],
    which liberalise existing rules (NO9904128N [2]). The ban on private
    employment agencies is abolished, while there are significant alterations to
    the provisions regulating the "leasing" of labour. The date from which the
    new provisions will come into force has been left to the government to
    decide. The governing centrist coalition parties managed to obtain a majority
    through a compromise solution with the Norwegian Labour Party
    (Arbeiderpartiet), with minor adjustments to the original proposal.

    [1] http://www.stortinget.no/inno/inno-199900-034.html
    [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/government-proposes-easing-ban-on-private-employment-agencies

  • Article
    27 Δεκέμβριος 1999

    On 2 December 1999, the government-appointed Working Life Committee
    (Arbeidslivskomiteen) delivered its report on the future challenges facing
    Norwegian working life. The rationale for the committee's work is the
    apparent need for more flexible ways of organising working life, in the face
    of increasing internationalisation of the economy and a shift towards a
    "post-industrial" society. The committee comprised representatives from all
    the major social partner organisations, the relevant government ministries
    and academic institutions. The chair of the committee was Tom Colbjoernsen, a
    professor at the Norwegian School of Economics and Business Administration
    (Norges Handelshøyskole).

  • Article
    27 Δεκέμβριος 1999

    Norwegian teachers took strike action in November 1999 in protest against the
    government's state Budget, on grounds that insufficient funds were set aside
    for the lower levels of the education system. The teachers also expressed
    dissatisfaction with the government's proposed measures to improve
    recruitment of teachers, introduced in a proposition to the Norwegian
    parliament. The strikes involved members of the two largest teachers' union,
    the Norwegian Union of Teachers (Norsk Lærerlag, NL) and the Teachers' Union
    Norway (Lærerforbundet). Several schools around the country were affected by
    the action, which took the form of a number of short "political" strikes and
    demonstrations. The teachers' unions stated that the strikes occurred
    spontaneously, without coordination from the central organisations.

  • Article
    27 Δεκέμβριος 1999

    The Norwegian Confederation of Trade Unions (Landsorganisasjonen i Norge, LO)
    is due to elect a new president in May 2001 to succeed Yngve Hågensen, who
    is retiring. The race to become the new leader is already underway. A strong
    candidate for the post is LO's vice-president, Gerd-Liv Valla. Many
    commentators believe that Ms Valla's candidature was strengthened when the
    leader of LO's bargaining cartel in the state sector, Terje Moe Gustavsen,
    decided not to run for the presidency in November 1999. Mr Moe Gustavsen, who
    was also regarded as a strong candidate for the position, is leaving his job
    as leader of LO-Stat for a new position in the newly merged
    telecommunications company Telenor/Telia.

  • Article
    27 Δεκέμβριος 1999

    Although GDP growth continued to be relatively robust in 1999, it decreased
    slightly to 3.5%, compared with 3.7% in 1998 and 3.8% in 1997 (which was the
    highest level since 1990). The budget showed a surplus of 0.25% of GDP in
    1999, compared with deficits of 1.75% in 1998 and 2.5% in 1997. Public debt
    as a proportion of GDP stood at 70.0% in 1998, down from 72.6% in 1997 (the
    figures had previously run at over 77% throughout the 1990s). Inflation rose
    slightly over 1999, to 2.2%, compared with 2.0% in 1998 and 2.2% in 1997
    (throughout the 1990s, inflation ran at around 2%-3%)

  • Article
    27 Δεκέμβριος 1999

    In November 1999, the Dutch government proposed calling a halt to the
    privatisation of social security and excluding the social partners from
    participating in its administration. The initiative unleashed harsh criticism
    from the social partners and outraged the trade union confederations. While
    unions announced plans for large-scale demonstrations, efforts to reach a
    compromise took place behind closed doors.

  • Article
    27 Δεκέμβριος 1999

    In December 1999, employer and employee representatives in the Dutch Social
    and Economic Council advised the government to abolish the financial
    advantages for companies contained in existing early retirement provisions,
    and suggested a more flexible pre-pension system. The proposals follow
    various government initiatives to keep older employees working longer, and a
    recently submitted Act on age discrimination intended to promote their
    participation in the labour market. Tensions surrounding labour shortages and
    the costs of an ageing population are thus now focusing attention on the
    position of older workers, following recent initiatives to boost the labour
    market participation of mainly female benefit recipients with children and of
    migrants.

  • Article
    27 Δεκέμβριος 1999

    In November 1999, the Dutch Central Bureau of Statistics reported that more
    people than before are working under increased time pressure, but other
    research indicates that increased work stress among highly-qualified people
    does not lead to higher levels of sickness absence. The majority of managers,
    a group known to work long hours, say they are happy with working weeks of
    between 45 and 50 hours.

  • Article
    27 Δεκέμβριος 1999

    It was announced in November 1999 that hundreds of jobs were in danger at the
    Dutch Joint Administration Office (GAK), which manages social security
    benefits, because the level of unemployment insurance and occupational
    disability benefits being paid out is decreasing as a result of the
    strengthening economy. Until recently, GAK was undergoing privatisation, but
    the government halted this process at the end of November. GAK is now to
    remain a publicly-owned company.