Publications

Search results: 917 items found
  • Article
    27 Δεκέμβριος 1999

    The European Commission issued its package of anti-discrimination proposals
    on 25 November after an initial three-week delay - the proposals were
    originally scheduled to be issued at the beginning of November. The proposals
    are based on the new anti-discrimination article of the European Community
    Treaty [1], Article 13 - introduced by the Amsterdam Treaty (EU9707135F [2])
    - which provides a new legal base for the Commission to issue proposals aimed
    at combating discrimination on grounds of sex, racial or ethnic origin,
    religion or belief, disability, age and sexual orientation.

    [1] http://europa.eu.int/smartapi/cgi/sga_doc?smartapi!celexapi!prod!CELEXnumdoc&lg=en&numdoc=t19ml&model=guichett
    [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/undefined/amsterdam-treaty-brings-small-advances-for-employment-and-social-policy

  • Article
    27 Δεκέμβριος 1999

    Labour and social affairs ministers made progress on a number of issues at
    their Council meeting in Brussels on 29 November 1999. The Council of
    Ministers agreed on the text of the draft Employment Guidelines for 2000 [1],
    the draft Employment Report 1999 [2] and the text of the draft
    Recommendations to Member States on the implementation of their employment
    policies [3]. This package of measures (EU9909187F [4]), which was confirmed
    at a joint meeting with the Economic and Financial Affairs Council (Ecofin),
    was then passed on to the European Council in Helsinki on 10-11 December for
    political approval and formal adoption at a forthcoming Council session.

    [1] http://europa.eu.int/comm/employment_social/empl&esf/empl2000/eg2000_en.pdf
    [2] http://europa.eu.int/comm/employment_social/empl&esf/empl2000/jer99_en.pdf
    [3] http://europa.eu.int/comm/employment_social/empl&esf/empl2000/recoms_en.pdf
    [4] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/undefined-business/commission-assesses-progress-of-employment-strategy

  • Article
    27 Δεκέμβριος 1999

    In November 1999, the 6,000 workers employed in Spanish shipyards, and many
    of the 30,000 working in auxiliary companies, participated in actions and
    mobilisations organised by the European Metalworkers' Federation. The aim was
    to call on the EU to take action against "social dumping" and supposed unfair
    competition by Asian shipyards.

  • Article
    27 Δεκέμβριος 1999

    In November 1999, the Spanish parliament declined to debate the issue of a
    35-hour working week and refused to accept for consideration a "popular
    legislative initiative" supported by more than 750,000 signatures.

  • Article
    27 Δεκέμβριος 1999

    A strike was held on Spain's RENFE rail network on 12-13 November 1999, the
    latest in a series of stoppages at the company. The November strike was
    called by trade unions in protest at the notices of dismissal issued to
    workers involved in incidents during action in October.

  • Article
    27 Δεκέμβριος 1999

    Robust economic growth and increased company profits were major factors in
    1999. GDP increased by 3.5% in the year to August 1999 (compared with 3.7% in
    1998). The public deficit, at some ESP 982 billion, represented 1.1% of GDP
    (compared with 0.9% in 1998). In November 1999, the inflation rate was 2.7%,
    well above original forecasts for the year, of 1.8%. Inflation rose at a rate
    of 1.8% in 1998.

  • Article
    27 Δεκέμβριος 1999

    The Danish economy grew moderately in 1999, despite forecasts of a
    significant slowdown. Total GDP growth was 2.7% in 1999, higher than the 2.4%
    achieved in 1998 and above original estimates of 1.7% growth in 1999.

  • Article
    27 Δεκέμβριος 1999

    The normal pattern in the Danish collective bargaining rounds in recent
    decades is that a general industrial dispute in one bargaining round is
    followed by a settlement in the next. If this pattern is repeated, then the
    major private sector industrial dispute in the spring of 1998, following the
    breakdown of bargaining (DK9805168F [1]), should be followed by an amicable
    settlement in 2000's bargaining round. On the other hand, the crisis
    surrounding the 1998 dispute echoes the period in the 1970s when three
    consecutive industrial disputes severely shook the Danish model of collective
    bargaining. Therefore, it cannot be excluded that the industrial dispute in
    1998 will be followed by a new breakdown and subsequent government
    intervention in 2000. Therefore, the question is whether the preparations for
    the 2000 bargaining round, with the conclusion in September 1999 of the
    so-called "climate agreement" (DK9910150F [2]) between the Danish
    Confederation of Trade Unions (Landsorganisationen i Danmark, LO) and the
    Danish Employers' Confederation (Dansk Arbejdsgiverfoprening, DA), and the
    parties' other endeavours to avoid a repeat of the events of 1998, are
    sufficient to ease the trend towards crisis, so that it will again be
    possible to say that after an industrial dispute comes a settlement.

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/undefined-industrial-relations/parliament-intervenes-to-end-major-conflict
    [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/undefined/lo-and-da-agree-stronger-coordinating-role-in-bargaining-rounds

  • Article
    27 Δεκέμβριος 1999

    Employees of Denmark's second-largest bank, Unibank, have accepted the
    introduction of a new pay system to replace the existing one, which according
    to tradition is based on education, job title and seniority. The new pay
    system means that all positions in the bank are to be examined and divided
    into 250 job functions. To each function is attached a pay framework which is
    determined on the basis of the degree of responsibility and difficulty of the
    job. During 2000, all employees will determine with their organisational
    superiors where they are to be placed in the system.

  • Article
    27 Δεκέμβριος 1999

    On 28 November 1999, the 2000 Danish collective bargaining round formally
    began. At a marathon meeting, the Union of Commercial and Clerical
    Employees/Commerce (Handel- og Kontorfunktionærernes Forbund/Handel,
    HK/Handel) and the Danish Commerce and Service (Dansk Handel og Service,
    DH&S) employers' organisation opened bargaining over a new agreement covering
    40,000 shop assistants. HK had prepared for swift negotiations, with an
    agreement before Christmas, but the employers were in no hurry. Within a day,
    it was evident that DH&S had no intentions of expediting a bargaining
    outcome, though the president of HK/Handel, Jørgen Hoppe, is still hoping
    for an early result. The parties were due to meet again shortly before
    Christmas, and Mr Hoppe believed that a result might be possible in early
    January 2000, when the decision-making bargaining committee meets.