Publications

Search results: 917 items found
  • Article
    27 Δεκέμβριος 1999

    In autumn and winter 1999, collective bargaining has been underway for a
    significant proportion of the Austrian labour force, with important
    agreements being negotiated in sectors such as metalworking (AT9911203N [1])
    and commerce (AT9912206N [2]). We take this opportunity to review the
    Austrian system of collective bargaining.

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/autumn-bargaining-round-underway
    [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/bargaining-round-in-commerce-concluded

  • Article
    27 Δεκέμβριος 1999

    Representatives of the Union of Salaried Employees (Gewerkschaft der
    Privatangestellten, GPA) and their counterparts in the commerce section of
    the Chamber of the Economy (Wirtschaftskammer Österreich, WKÖ) concluded a
    new collective agreement for the commerce sector's 350,000 employees on 18
    November 1999. Negotiations turned out to be difficult in this year's
    bargaining round, as substantial differences between the bargaining parties
    became evident. As a consequence, negotiations were interrupted for several
    times due to disputes over various issues. The union's demand for minimum
    salary increases was 2.8%, whereas WKÖ's commerce section offered only 0.8%.
    A moderate settlement was finally concluded against the background of a
    favourable economic trend in commerce. This provides for an rise of 1.75% in
    minimum salaries and apprentices' remuneration - considerably lower than the
    increases previously agreed in the bargaining round in industrial sectors
    (AT9911203N [1]). Furthermore, it was agreed that existing "overpayments"
    (Überzahlungen) of employees will be maintained. This means that the new
    agreement does not affect payments above collectively agreed salary rates,
    granted by employers to attract qualified personnel. Such clauses are common
    in Austria, given that such overpayments are individually negotiated.

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/autumn-bargaining-round-underway

  • Article
    27 Νοέμβριος 1999

    This feature looks at recent evidence on patterns of absence and at current
    management practice in attendance control. It does not review familiar facts
    (UK9705127F [1]). It is, for example, well-known that absence is relatively
    high among blue-collar workers, for fairly obvious reasons. Lists of "causes"
    are also commonplace but of limited value in considering the significance of
    absence for managers and workers.

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/working-conditions-undefined/absenteeism-continues-to-cost-the-uk-dear

  • Article
    27 Νοέμβριος 1999

    In 1999, 31 December will be a one-off additional public holiday in the UK to
    mark the new millennium. This has contributed an additional upward pressure
    for greater pay and time off in lieu for workers obliged to work over the new
    year holiday period. The main jobs affected by millennium working are in
    information technology (IT), leisure, the utilities and emergency services.
    According to a recent survey ("Millennium payments", IDS Studies 675,
    September 1999), levels of compensation differ according to: whether the
    requirement to work over the new year period applies each year (as is the
    case for many public sector workers and shiftworkers); whether a standby
    arrangement applies (a much larger group in 1999 than usual); or whether
    staff have specifically been contracted for the 1999/2000 new year period
    (especially IT specialists and workers in the leisure sectors).

  • Article
    27 Νοέμβριος 1999

    On 25 October 1999, a meeting between Jacques Nasser, president of Ford, and
    senior leaders of four UK unions - the Transport and General Workers Union
    (TGWU), the Amalgamated Engineering and Electrical Union (AEEU), the GMB
    general union and the MSF white-collar union - resulted in a joint statement
    outlining plans for a review of equal opportunities policies in the US-based
    motor manufacturing company's UK plants. The meeting had been sought by TGWU
    general secretary Bill Morris following an employment tribunal hearing in
    September at which the company was reported to have admitted liability for
    the sustained racial abuse of an Asian production worker, Sukhjit Parmar, by
    supervisors at the Ford Dagenham engine plant. The company said that the
    allegations had been fully investigated and were being dealt with through
    internal disciplinary procedures.

  • Article
    27 Νοέμβριος 1999

    John Monks, the general secretary of the UK's Trades Union Congress (TUC),
    has strongly criticised the Labour government for acting as the "key
    organiser" of a blocking minority within the EU Council to prevent the
    adoption of the draft EU Directive on national information and consultation
    rules. Speaking at the annual conference of the Institute for Personnel and
    Development on 28 October 1999, Mr Monks warned that this is probably the
    issue on which there is the "sharpest divide" between "new Labour" and the
    unions. In September, the TUC's 1999 Congress passed a resolution regretting
    the government's stance on the draft Directive and calling for its speedy
    adoption.

  • Article
    27 Νοέμβριος 1999

    An employer was entitled to dismiss summarily a newspaper journalist who sent
    on a copy of a fax message, addressed to the letters-to-the-editor column, to
    the employer of the man who signed and sent the message, according to the
    Labour Court's recent ruling in the labour law part of a case in question.
    The case was initially tried in a district court and then in a court of civil
    and criminal appeal, when the journalist was prosecuted for breaching the
    Swedish Act on Press Freedom (Tryckfrihetsförordningen, TF) and its rules on
    anonymity for a person giving information to the press, whereby journalists
    are obliged to observe professional secrecy. The female journalist, employed
    by a provincial newspaper, claimed in court that the fax message was one of
    several "letters" with sexually-harassing contents, signed by a single
    sender. After the district court found against the journalist, the court of
    appeal (Svea Hovrätt) reduced the severity of the lower court's judgment,
    finding that the journalist was guilty of an offence against professional
    secrecy, but only through carelessness and not through intentionally breaking
    the law, and her penalty was reduced.

  • Article
    27 Νοέμβριος 1999

    In a memorandum issued at the beginning of October 1999, the Ministry for
    Industry, Employment and Communications (näringsdepartementet) proposes
    adding a new rule on retirement age to the Employment Protection Act (lagen
    om anställningsskydd). The average retirement age in most collective
    agreements is currently 65 years. The new rule will, if passed by parliament,
    state that any existing agreement that obliges an employee to retire between
    65 and 67 years with a retirement pension will not be valid in future. The
    retirement age would be set at exactly 67 years in all these agreements from
    1 January 2001. The proposed rule would apply to both collective agreements
    and individual agreements. The proposed change is a somewhat sensitive issue
    as, for example, the Swedish Employers' Confederation (Svenska
    Arbetsgivareföreningen, SAF) and spokespersons for legal authorities claim
    that it may not be legal, according to certain International Labour
    Organisation Conventions, to interfere in collective agreements in the manner
    proposed.

  • Article
    27 Νοέμβριος 1999

    At the end of September 1999, the Swedish government charged a special
    commissioner, Lena Svenaeus- who will shortly be resigning from her post as
    the Equal Opportunity Ombudsman (jämställdhetsombudsmannen, JämO) - with
    the task of analysing the possible need of stronger protection for the
    personal integrity in working life (/direktiv nr 1999:73/). Issues such as
    the use of drug-tests and other medical controls will be reviewed, along with
    issues relating to the use of personal computers, electronic mail and the
    Internet at work. Other personal integrity matters that may arise during the
    commissioner's work, especially matters dealing with the protection of job
    applicants, are also to be considered.

  • Article
    27 Νοέμβριος 1999

    In the middle of the night of 26 October 1999, the Electricians' Union
    (Svenska Elektrikerförbundet, SEF) and the Electrical Contractors'
    Organisation (Elektriska Installatörsorganisationen EIO) concluded a new
    collective agreement (installationsavtal) after more than a month of
    industrial action (SE9909190N [1]). The new agreement contains a pay rise of
    8.5% over a three-year period. It also contains a provision that piecework
    should be used as often as possible, and clauses on flexible working time.
    The agreement is valid until 31 March 2001. SEF has about 22,000 members in
    2,600 companies.

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/electricians-take-industrial-action-over-new-agreement