Publications

Search results: 1453 items found
  • Article
    9 Δεκέμβριος 2007

    Speaking at the biennial conference of the Services Industrial Professional
    and Technical Union (SIPTU [1]), held on 2–5 October 2007, SIPTU General
    President Jack O’Connor warned that ‘certain issues’ must be faced up
    to if the trade union is to continue in social partnership under the national
    agreement Towards 2016 (2.86Mb PDF) [2]. The union leader highlighted a
    number of issues, including equal treatment for temporary agency workers, the
    right to representation at work and the pensions ‘time bomb’. As the
    country’s largest trade union, SIPTU is a hugely influential voice within
    the Irish trade union movement.

    [1] http://www.siptu.ie/
    [2] http://www.taoiseach.gov.ie/attached_files/Pdf files/Towards2016PartnershipAgreement.pdf

  • Article
    9 Δεκέμβριος 2007

    An agreement between Aer Lingus [1] and the pilots’ representative trade
    union, the Irish Municipal Public and Civil Trade Union (IMPACT [2]), is
    expected to lay down an industrial relations precedent for any future foreign
    bases planned by the former state-owned airline. Aer Lingus, which was
    privatised in 2006, plans to open its new Belfast operations on 10 December
    2007.

    [1] http://www.aerlingus.com/
    [2] http://www.impact.ie/iopen24/pub/

  • Article
    9 Δεκέμβριος 2007

    The Malta Council for Economic and Social Development (MCESD [1]) was
    established by law in 2001, to act as an advisory body to the government
    while providing a forum for consultation and dialogue between the social
    partners. However, over the years, social partners have often complained that
    the council was unable to fulfil its purpose, due primarily to insufficient
    human and financial resources.

    [1] http://www.mcesd.org.mt/

  • Article
    9 Δεκέμβριος 2007

    The annual conference of the Trades Union Congress (TUC [1]), held on 10–13
    September 2007, adopted a resolution calling for a UK referendum on the EU
    Draft Reform Treaty [2]. Union leaders also urged the UK government to drop
    the ‘opt-out [3]’ it has secured from legal enforceability of the Charter
    of Fundamental Rights, which is to be granted under the reform treaty
    (*UK0707049I* [4]). The ‘solidarity’ chapter of the charter guarantees a
    range of rights for trade unions and employees.

    [1] http://www.tuc.org.uk/
    [2] http://europa.eu/reform_treaty/index_en.htm
    [3] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/industrial-relations-dictionary/opt-out
    [4] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/mixed-reaction-to-opt-out-from-eu-charter-of-fundamental-rights

  • Article
    9 Δεκέμβριος 2007

    On 19 November 2003, the Hungarian government made several decisions
    concerning the future of Hungarian State Railways (Magyar Államvasutak, MÁV
    [1]), one of these being a major reduction in MÁV’s workforce. The
    company’s board decided that, by the end of 2006, the number of employees
    should be reduced from about 53,000 people to no more than 42,000. Through
    the mass redundancy, the government expected to save at least HUF 22 billion
    (€88 million, as at 6 November 2007). The redundancy of around 11,000
    employees, representing 20% of the workforce, was the largest lay-off in the
    history of MÁV.

    [1] http://www.mav.hu/

  • Article
    9 Δεκέμβριος 2007

    Since October 2007, the social partners in Ireland have been grappling with
    the concept of flexicurity [1] – a hybrid term that is used to describe
    policies and measures that combine labour market flexibility [2], on the one
    hand, and employment protection [3] or social security [4], on the other. The
    issue looks sure to feature in any new social partnership talks in 2008. It
    seems likely that trade unions and employers will seek negotiated
    ‘trade-offs’ around issues like vocational training and lifelong learning
    [5].

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/industrial-relations-dictionary/flexicurity
    [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/industrial-relations-dictionary/flexibility
    [3] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/industrial-relations-dictionary/employment-protection
    [4] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/industrial-relations-dictionary/social-security
    [5] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/industrial-relations-dictionary/lifelong-learning

  • Article
    9 Δεκέμβριος 2007

    Since the EU enlargement in May 2004, a significant number of workers from
    the new EU Member States have entered the Norwegian labour market, the
    largest group of which are Polish workers (NO0606039I [1]). Trade unions and
    the media report that pay and working conditions among employees from the new
    EU Member States are significantly lower than is normal in Norwegian working
    life (NO0405105F [2], NO0506101N [3], NO0612029I [4], NO0609039I [5]).
    However, up to now little statistical information has been available about
    the working conditions of these newcomers.

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/figures-show-sizeable-labour-migration-from-new-eu-member-states
    [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/transitional-arrangements-introduced-for-free-movement-of-workers-from-new-eu-member-states
    [3] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/norway-trying-to-cope-with-the-free-movement-of-workers-from-the-new-member-states
    [4] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/construction-sector-agreement-extended-to-protect-foreign-workers
    [5] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/regulatory-authorities-to-stamp-out-illegal-work-practices-regarding-migrant-workers

  • Article
    9 Δεκέμβριος 2007

    The National Surveillance System for Work Environment and Occupational Health
    (Nasjonal overvåking av arbeidsmiljø og -helse, NOA [1]) was established in
    Norway in 2006. Its first comprehensive report or fact book (in Norwegian)
    [2] on the status of and trends in the work environment and occupational
    health was published in August 2007. The report was based on available data
    from surveys regularly performed by Statistics Norway (Statistisk
    sentralbyrås, SSB [3]) over the past decade, as well as data from several
    other national bodies, including: the Norwegian Labour and Welfare
    Organisation (Arbeids- og velferdsforvaltningen, NAV [4]); the National
    Institute of Occupational Health (Statens arbeidsmiljøinstitutt, STAMI [5])
    and its database for occupational exposure measurements (EXPO [6]); and the
    Authorities’ Central Register of Chemical Products (Statens sentrale
    register over kjemiske produkter, Produktregisteret [7]).

    [1] http://www.arbeidshelsen.no/NOA/In_English/
    [2] http://www.arbeidshelsen.no/?module=Articles;action=Article.publicShow;ID=3355
    [3] http://www.ssb.no/english/
    [4] http://www.nav.no/page?id=1073744140
    [5] http://www.stami.no/In_English/
    [6] http://www.arbeidshelsen.no/in_English/?module=Articles;action=Article.publicOpen;ID=1471
    [7] http://www.produktregisteret.no/english/

  • Article
    9 Δεκέμβριος 2007

    The doctoral thesis on /Psychosocial job stress in relation to health/ (2007)
    by Els Clays from the University of Ghent, Belgium, aimed to examine the
    perception of psychosocial job stress in relation to health outcomes within
    the longitudinal Belstress (in Dutch) [1] study. In terms of methodology, the
    research is based on the ‘Job demand-control-support (JDCS)’ model,
    introduced by Robert Karasek in the 1970s. According to this model, the most
    adverse job-related strain reactions are to be expected in jobs which are
    characterised by high psychological demands and low decision latitude
    (autonomy and freedom to use one’s skills) or job control, alongside low
    social support at the workplace.

    [1] http://www.pao.ugent.be/belstress.htm

  • Article
    9 Δεκέμβριος 2007

    An ‘Assessment of unregistered employment’ is one of 13 projects
    initiated by the Latvian Ministry of Welfare (Labklājības Ministrija, LM
    [1]) in the framework of the National Programme on Labour Market Studies,
    supported by the European Social Fund [2]. The research project was conducted
    by the University of Latvia (Latvijas Universitāte, LU [3]) in cooperation
    with the consultancies InMind Ltd (now known as GfK Custom Research Baltic
    [4]) and Latvijas Fakti Ltd.

    [1] http://www.lm.gov.lv/
    [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/industrial-relations-dictionary/european-social-fund
    [3] http://www.lu.lv
    [4] http://www.gfk.lv/