EMCC European Monitoring Centre on Change

Greening of industry

These 48 company case studies are examples of good practice in the anticipation and management of green change in 10 sectors.

Analysis focuses on how to strengthen competitiveness and increase both the quantity and quality of jobs while protecting the environment. Collaborative approaches involving the social partners, public authorities, education and training providers, non-government organisations and other actors are of particular interest. It is hoped that these cases will provide useful insights and ideas to other companies in similar sectors.

48 items found (page 1 of 5)

Estonia: Skanska EMV AS

  • Organisation Size

    250-500

Skanska EMV AS is a large company in the construction sector of Estonia that has adopted a green business practice by finding new solutions for energy-efficient building. The case study illustrates the implementation and challenges of green change in the construction sector from the perspective of a large company in a new EU Member State. It demonstrates the impact of climate change on the entire functioning of business and provides examples of approaches used by the company to manage green change, including change in number and quality of jobs. Introduction The Estonian construction sector

Cyprus: Metro Foods Trading

  • Organisation Size

    100-499

Since 2008, Metro Foods Trading Ltd has implemented a comprehensive set of green business practices and is currently one of the most environmentally friendly retailers in Cyprus. To do this, the company has collaborated with private sector companies and NGOs. The employment impact of green business practices is rather limited to date, due to the characteristics of the practices, the features of its economic sector (retail trade) and efforts made to simplify green labour tasks as much as possible. Introduction According to the Statistical Service of Cyprus, in 2009 the share of the trade

Sweden: Green Cargo

  • Organisation Size

    500+

Green Cargo is a Swedish company with 2,800 employees, providing railway-based freight transport services nationally and internationally. It has positioned its entire business as the greenest transport service provider in Sweden by promoting its high share of renewable electricity powered trains. Furthermore, it is constantly striving to reduce its remaining use of fossil fuels through a number of efficiency measures. The case study illustrates how a company can exploit and promote its advantage to provide environmentally superior services and make a substantial impact in the market, and

Portugal: Sonae Indústria case study

  • Organisation Size

    500+

Sonae Indústria produces wood-based panels for the furniture and construction sectors. Sonae Indústria’s subsidiary, Ecociclo, implemented a system to recycle wood for the panel factories. This approach represented an overall investment of €6.5 million and has created 20 direct new jobs (with many more additional indirect jobs related with upstream operations and transports – estimated at 90). Workers have received on-the-job training; their skills and experience have allowed them to conduct educational sessions for children in local schools. Ecociclo’s operation has improved workers self-

Spain: AENA – Barcelona Airport, el Prat de Llobregat, case study

  • Organisation Size

    500+

AENA aeropuertos (AENA) is a state-owned company that operates Barcelona’s El Prat airport facility. AENA is responsible, among other tasks, for the planning, coordination, operation, maintenance, management and administration of Barcelona airport. The case study illustrates how developing alternative mobility programs, as opposed to predominating mobility patterns based on private motor vehicles, clearly improves and increases public transport services, reduces harmful environmental effects, generates social and economic benefits, and creates new jobs which, in this case, were promoted by

Hungary: VELUX Magyarország Kft. case study

  • Organisation Size

    500+

This case study introduces VELUX Magyarország Kft., a Hungarian member of the international VELUX Group producing roof windows. The two green business practices studied here are the installation of a new chip extraction system, which reduced energy consumption significantly and improved the working environment, and a call for ideas for employees on ways to reduce energy consumption which led to many good suggestions that will be implemented by the company. The case study focuses on the new chip extraction system, but summarises best practices and their effects on the working conditions of

Austria: Wienerberger

  • Organisation Size

    100-499

For Wienerberger, a corporation engaged in the manufacture of clay bricks and roof tiles, green issues lie at the core of its business, and climate change is a major challenge. The corporation has for many years focused on the energy-efficient production of bricks and the further optimisation of its production processes. Another focus is improving the energy efficiency of the end products. The ‘green transformation’ of the company had considerable impacts on the quantity and quality of jobs. Most green jobs were the result of the transformation of pre-existing positions, with some new jobs

Italy: Novamont

  • Organisation Size

    100-499

Novamont is a medium-sized company in the chemical sector, an international leader in the development of materials from renewable resources and low environmental impact systems. The production of Mater-Bi materials, which represents the core green business of the company, has been selected as the focus of this case study. The case study illustrates the implementation and challenges of this green practice and exemplifies approaches used by the company to anticipate and manage green change, including the change in the number and quality of jobs. Introduction Novamont is a company created in

Portugal: EDP Group case study

  • Organisation Size

    500+

EDP develops its core business activities in the energy sector – a sector that is vital to economic and social development. The improvement in energy efficiency throughout the value chain and reducing carbon dioxide emissions are among the company’s most important targets. The rapid development of the production of renewable (namely wind) energies has led to an increase in the number of direct and indirect jobs, and the diversification of skills in this green area of business. This is contrary to what has been happening in conventional energy generation where technological innovation has

United Kingdom: GlassEco, case study

  • Organisation Size

    0-99

GlassEco is a small British company in the non-metallic sector, recycling various types of glass into worktops used for bathroom and kitchen surfaces and other applications. The company also produces tiles, floorings, moulded sinks and baths. The company is a green start-up with its own developed and patented recycling technology. The company initially had four employees, but gradually that has risen to 30. The company employs workers with entry level skills and the core team of experts trains them. The case study was prepared between January and May 2012. Introduction GlassEco was

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