Publications

Search results: 776 items found
  • Article
    19 Diciembre 2002

    At its 31st conference in November 2002, the Greek General Confederation of
    Labour (GSEE) took a number of important decisions on organisational
    restructuring. There will be closer cooperation and, it is planned, eventual
    merger with the Confederation of Public Servants (ADEDY), along with greater
    coordination between GSEE member organisations at regional, prefectural and
    sector level. The conference also adopted measures on economic independence
    and amended GSEE's statutes.

  • Article
    19 Diciembre 2002

    The Norwegian Labour Party (Det norske Arbeiderparti, DnA) held its 59th
    national conference in November 2002, and one of the items on the agenda was
    the close relationship between the party and the Norwegian Confederation of
    Trade Unions (Landsorganisasjonen i Norge, LO). The formal ties between the
    two organisations (NO9709122F [1]) are becoming increasingly controversial,
    and have been a source of significant criticism both within and outside the
    labour movement. Recent developments in terms of declining electoral support
    for DnA and declining membership for LO, as well as increasing internal
    tension within both organisations, have added to these controversies. In
    response to these developments the president of LO, Gerd-Liv Valla, decided
    not to join the national executive committee of DnA. However, the delegates
    at the conference stressed the need to continue and indeed strengthen
    cooperation between the two organisations, but to deliberate and develop less
    formal channels of communication and cooperation.

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/undefined/social-partners-support-for-political-parties-in-the-election-campaign

  • Article
    19 Diciembre 2002

    Following a decision in October to phase out the early retirement scheme for
    civil servants, in late 2002 the French government set out its schedule for
    pension reform and issued various statements on the issue. It has developed
    two priority areas - 'equal treatment for all' and 'freedom of choice'. Trade
    unions are challenging the process and fear that the government has already
    decided how pensions are to be reformed.

  • Article
    19 Diciembre 2002

    On 25-26 November 2002, over 400 trade union representatives and
    employee-side members of European Works Councils (EWCs) took part in a major
    conference, entitled /Towards more influence/, which aimed to discuss
    improvements in EWC practice and highlight the trade union case for
    amendments to the EWCs Directive (94/45/EC) [1]. The conference, organised
    jointly by the European Trade Union Confederation (ETUC) and the main Danish
    national trade union organisations, with the support of the European
    Commission, was held in the Danish city of Aarhus as part of the programme of
    activities associated with Denmark’s Presidency of the EU during the second
    half of 2002. This feature reports on the main strands of the discussion.

    [1] http://europa.eu.int/smartapi/cgi/sga_doc?smartapi!celexapi!prod!CELEXnumdoc&lg=EN&numdoc=31994L0045&model=guichett

  • Article
    18 Diciembre 2002

    2002 has seen the creation of a new nationwide trade union organisation in
    Poland, alongside the two main existing centres, NSZZ Solidarność and OPZZ.
    The Trade Unions Forum (FZZ) has its roots in a number of organisations which
    split from OPZZ, and now has 36 affiliates. The new body's membership exceeds
    300,000, the threshold for representation on the national Tripartite
    Commission, and it is thus seeking a Commission seat alongside NSZZ
    Solidarność and OPZZ.

  • Article
    18 Diciembre 2002

    Polish trade unions have problems in articulating the relations between
    different levels of their organisation (workplace, regional/branch and
    national), exacerbated by the political rift between the two major union
    organisations, NSZZ Solidarność and OPZZ. In 2002, there have been a number
    of attempts by unions to formulate joint positions and pursue mutual
    interests, but these generally continue to be of a half-hearted and strictly
    ad hoc nature. However, the increasing presence of multinational companies in
    Poland has raised a need for closer cooperation between local union bodies in
    these multinationals' Polish operations, especially where there is a European
    Works Council in place. This article examines the state of inter-union
    cooperation and examines the case of an innovative joint trade union
    representation body at the Żywiec brewery group, owned by Heineken.

  • Article
    18 Diciembre 2002

    Although the Hungarian industrial relations system which took shape in the
    1990s formally includes three layers of national, sectoral and company-level
    institutions, the sector level is widely known to be the weakest of them -
    social dialogue and bargaining practices at sector level are fairly
    underdeveloped. In 2001, only 6% of employees were covered by voluntary
    sectoral collective agreements, and extension procedures (applying sectoral
    agreements to employers and employees not belonging to signatory
    organisations) increased coverage by only 2.1 percentage points (TN0212102S
    [1]). Moreover, the contents of sectoral agreements are rather poor and the
    guarantees of implementation are doubtful (TN0207102F [2]). Previous
    governments have established various sectoral consultation fora, which
    formally work with the sectoral Ministries, but neither employers nor trade
    unions have been satisfied with the contents and results of these
    negotiations.

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/erm/comparative-information/collective-bargaining-coverage-and-extension-procedures
    [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/industrial-relations-in-the-candidate-countries

  • Article
    18 Diciembre 2002

    In late 2002, the Spanish social partners are seeking to negotiate a central
    agreement to provide a framework for lower-level collective bargaining in
    2003, as they did for 2002. The two main trade union confederations, CC.OO
    and UGT, presented their proposals for a new agreement in December. It
    appears that a major issue in 2003's collective bargaining will be wage
    revision clauses, which link pay increases to inflation. The government
    (supported by the Bank of Spain and the IMF) wants to abolish these clauses,
    on the grounds that they cause inflation, but the unions see them as
    essential for maintaining workers' purchasing power and domestic consumption.

  • Article
    18 Diciembre 2002

    In November 2002, the Spanish government and three trade unions (CC.OO, UGT
    and CSI-CSIF) signed an agreement on 'the modernisation and improvement of
    the public administration'. The two-year deal will introduce changes aimed at
    improving the services provided by the public administration and
    rationalising the structure of the workforce. It provides for above-inflation
    pay increases and the introduction of a 35-hour week, along with measures to
    promote employment stability.

  • Article
    17 Diciembre 2002

    On 6 December 2002, the blue-collar Swedish Confederation of Trade Unions
    (Landsorganisationen, LO) presented a report [1] on its members' wages and
    their development from 1994 to 2002. The data is based on structural wage
    statistics from Sweden Statistics (Statistiska Centralbyrån), divided into
    five main sectors. LO has also examined the extent of the 'wage spread' and
    its development over 1994-2001.

    [1] http://www.lo.se/raw/documents/39511_loner_2002.pdf