Publications

Search results: 749 items found
  • Article
    23 Noviembre 2008

    In September 2008, the journalist Johanna Korhonen was named as the new
    editor-in-chief of the newspaper Lapin Kansa [1]. Ms Korhonen had left her
    previous job as editor-in-chief of /Journalisti/, the newspaper of the
    Finnish Union of Journalists (Suomen Journalistiliitto, SLJ [2]) and was due
    to take up her new position at Lapin Kansa in mid December. However, her
    contract was unexpectedly cancelled before the start date. Ms Korhonen is
    insisting that the move by Lapin Kansa was as a result of the revelation that
    she is living in a registered civil union with another woman.

    [1] http://www.lapinkansa.fi/
    [2] https://www.journalistiliitto.fi/Resource.phx/sivut/sivut-journalistiliitto/index.htx

  • Article
    23 Noviembre 2008

    On 26 September 2008, the trendsetting metalworking industry opened
    Austria’s autumn bargaining round, when the employee representatives
    formally handed over their joint list of demands to the employer side. This
    list mainly includes pay-related demands, particularly increases in minimum
    and real wages and salaries, plus equivalent increases in additional payments
    and apprentices’ remuneration. However, in terms of pay increases, the
    trade unions did not determine any specific percentages.

  • Article
    23 Noviembre 2008

    The significant rise in redundancies in Sweden is attributed to the current
    turbulent and insecure financial market. In September 2008 alone, some 8,000
    people received redundancy notices. Manufacturing industries such as car
    manufacturers and paper and pulp companies have been among the worst affected
    by Sweden’s declining economy. Moreover, because of the increased number of
    redundancies, young people will find it more difficult to enter the labour
    market due to the rising unemployment figures which are set to follow the
    redundancies, claims the Swedish Public Employment Service
    (Arbetsförmedlingen [1]).

    [1] http://www.arbetsformedlingen.se/

  • Article
    23 Noviembre 2008

    In September 2008, the Confederation of British Industry (CBI [1]) published
    the results of its annual employment trends survey [2] conducted in
    conjunction with the Pertemps recruitment agency. The survey, carried out in
    May 2008, analyses the responses of over 500 employers across all sectors of
    the economy, 12% of which were public sector employers. In terms of company
    size, 7% of respondents employed 5,000 or more staff, 32% employed
    500–4,999 workers, 20% employed 200–499 workers, 25% employed 50–199
    workers and 17% employed fewer than 50 staff. This article gives an overview
    of the report’s main findings relating to industrial relations.

    [1] http://www.cbi.org.uk/
    [2] http://www.cbi.org.uk/ndbs/Press.nsf/38e2a44440c22db6802567300067301b/756a69cc0d02851a802574b7002f8c0f?OpenDocument

  • Article
    23 Noviembre 2008

    On 25 September 2008, the UK Trades Union Congress (TUC [1]) and two Polish
    trade union confederations signed a protocol in London, strengthening the
    ties between the organisations and committing them to work more closely with
    one another. The two Polish unions are the Independent and Self-Governing
    Trade Union ‘Solidarity’ (Niezależny Samorządny Związek Zawodowy
    ‘Solidarność’, NSZZ Solidarność [2]) and the All-Poland Alliance of
    Trade Unions (Ogólnopolskie Porozumienie Związków Zawodowych, OPZZ [3]).

    [1] http://www.tuc.org.uk/
    [2] http://www.solidarnosc.org.pl/
    [3] http://opzz.org.pl/

  • Article
    23 Noviembre 2008

    Between July and August 2008, the YouGov [1] research company, on behalf of
    the Trades Union Congress (TUC [2]), conducted an online poll of a
    representative sample of 2,857 workers. The poll sought to examine workers’
    attitudes towards their jobs and employers, along with the types of problems
    they face at work, and what they want from employers, trade unions and the
    government. The TUC describes the survey findings – published in September
    2008 in a report entitled What do workers want? (647Kb PDF) [3] – as
    setting an ‘agenda for the workplace from the workplace’.

    [1] http://www.yougov.com/
    [2] http://www.tuc.org.uk/
    [3] http://www.tuc.org.uk/em_research/tuc-15269-f0.pdf

  • Article
    23 Noviembre 2008

    The German company Vacuumschmelze (VAC [1]), headquartered in Hanau in the
    federal state of Hesse in central Germany, is a leading manufacturer of
    advanced magnetic materials. VAC employs around 1,500 staff. In a press
    release (in German, 22Kb PDF) [2] on 8 August 2008, the Chair of the
    company’s management, Hartmut Eiseler, stated that, due to volatile
    exchange rates and exploding energy and raw material prices, the company
    would not be able to generate the revenues anticipated for 2008.

    [1] http://www.vacuumschmelze.de/dynamic/en/
    [2] http://www.vacuumschmelze.de/dynamic/docroot/medialib/documents/zusatzinformationen/presseinfos/2008/10-VAC_AusstiegTarif080808.pdf

  • Article
    23 Noviembre 2008

    The Swedish group Electrolux [1] is a world leader in the production of
    electrical household appliances and kitchen appliances for industrial use. It
    has six manufacturing plants in Italy and employs over 8,000 workers in the
    country. In Italy, the Group produced stock amounting to seven million
    appliances in 2007, which corresponds to 25% of the Italian market and more
    than a third of total production in Europe.

    [1] http://www.electrolux.com/

  • Article
    23 Noviembre 2008

    International framework agreements (IFAs) came into being 20 years ago. These
    agreements are the result of bargaining between a multinational enterprise
    and an international sectoral trade union federation, sometimes supported by
    the national trade union federations as local experts. Despite the fact that
    IFAs follow the principle that quality work should receive a commensurate
    salary, they do not address the pay part of negotiations directly. Instead,
    they deal with workers’ rights and trade union representativeness [1],
    including the freedom to choose a preferred trade union organisation and the
    right to collective bargaining [2]; the agreements also seek to eliminate
    child and hard labour and every form of discrimination [3] between workers.
    Furthermore, IFAs promote the organisation of a form of production which
    protects the environment and the health and safety [4] of workers.

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/industrial-relations-dictionary/representativeness
    [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/industrial-relations-dictionary/collective-bargaining
    [3] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/industrial-relations-dictionary/discrimination
    [4] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/industrial-relations-dictionary/health-and-safety

  • Article
    23 Noviembre 2008

    A recent study (in German) [1] by the Institute of Economic and Social
    Research (Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaftliches Institut, WSI [2]) within
    the Hans Böckler Foundation (Hans Böckler Stiftung, HBS [3]) presented new
    findings on the extent of relocation and outsourcing [4] based on data from
    the 2007 WSI works council [5] survey (/Betriebsrätebefragung/). The survey
    was carried out between September and November 2007, and covered a
    representative sample of establishments with 20 or more employees and a works
    council.

    [1] http://www.boeckler.de/show_product_wsi.html?productfile=HBS-004211.xml
    [2] http://www.boeckler.de/8.html
    [3] http://www.boeckler.de/
    [4] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/industrial-relations-dictionary/outsourcing
    [5] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/efemiredictionary/works-council-2