Publications

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Eurofound publishes its work in a range of publication formats to match audience needs and the nature of the output. These include flagship reports on a particular area of activity, research reports summarising the findings of a research project and policy briefs presenting policy pointers from research projects or facts and figures relevant to policy debates. Also included are blog articles, regular articles on working life in Europe, presentations, working papers providing background material to ongoing or already concluded research, and reports arising from ad hoc requests by policymakers. Other corporate publications include annual reports, brochures and promotional publications. Web databases and online resources such as data visualisation applications are available in Data and resources.


  • Equal opportunities and collective bargaining in the EU

    /The European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions is currently conducting a major research project on Equal opportunities and collective bargaining in Europe, co-funded by DG V of the European Commission. The aim is to assist in the complicated task of promoting equal opportunities for women and men by means of collective bargaining. The continuing project has at present reached the stage where the issues have been defined, and national reports drawn up by a network of correspondents, exploring the context of the issue in each of the 15 EU member states. A consolidated report on stage one of the project has been prepared by Yota Kravaritou of the European University Institute. /
  • New rules for family credits

    The Standing Committee for Social Dialogue (the Economic and Social Council's tripartite committee) has approved new rules relating to family credits in Portugal.
  • Impasse in metalworking

    In 10 sessions over the course of five months, the Metals, Mining and Energy Workers trade union (Gewerkschaft Metall-Bergbau-Energie, GMBE) and eight associations together comprising the metalworking sector within the Bundessektion Industrie of the Austrian Chamber of the Economy (Wirtschaftskammer Österreich, WKÖ) have thrashed out a collective agreement on working time flexibilisation covering 229,000 employees (162,000 waged, 67,000 salaried) in industrial establishments. However, one of the eight associations - Fachverband der Metallwarenindustrie- has been blocking ratification of the deal since mid-March.
  • UK now one of the least strike-prone countries in the OECD

    An international comparison of labour disputes from 1986 to 1995 by /Labour Market Trends/ (April 1997) highlights that the UK had the fourth-lowest strike rate of the 22 member countries of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) in 1995. Only Austria, Switzerland and Germany had a lower level of strikes than the UK. The UK strike rate has been below the OECD average since 1986 and below the EU average since 1990. Between 1991 and 1995 the average rate in the UK was 24 working days lost per 1,000 workers - an 82% fall over the previous five-year period. But the UK's rise in the international "league table" of two places since 1994 took place despite an increase in the strike rate itself.
  • Negotiations on retirement age equality postponed

    Government plans to amend Finnish legislation to bring it into line with EU equality law have recently proved controversial with the Finnish Confederation of Salaried Employees (STTK). Following negotiations, further discussion of the issue has been postponed to autumn 1997.
  • Government invitation to social dialogue

    Taking into account significant changes in the international environment and their impact on the Greek economy, the Government in March 1997 announced that it would invite the social partners to a process of social dialogue on a set of three themes: development, competitiveness and employment. The first meeting is scheduled to take place towards the end of May. Participants in the dialogue include representatives of Ministries, employer and employee organisations from both the private and the public sectors and the Chambers of Commerce, amongst others.
  • Union election result shocks leadership

    Ireland's largest trade union, the Services Industrial Professional and Technical Union (SIPTU), has a new president after a closer than expected ballot of its 180,000 members. The tight result - announced in early April 1997 - surprised the union's leadership, given the fact that a left-wing activist polled almost 42% of the votes cast compared with the 56% who voted for former vice-president, Jimmy Somers.
  • TAP-Air Portugal pilots react against loss of compensation

    Workers at TAP-Air Portugal issued a general notice to strike on 24-25 April 1997 in protest at revised flight and rest-time schedules
  • Union wins landmark equal pay cases

    The cases have been hailed as a major victory for all National Health Service (NHS) staff by the Manufacturing, Science and Finance (MSF) trade union, which represented the workers involved in their cases. The union's national secretary, Roger Kline said that the: "case is a momentous one. It has implications for women staff throughout the NHS and other industries. It is a landmark decision and is the biggest single breakthrough on equal pay for women for many years."
  • New industrial relations structure planned for national airline

    It emerged in April 1997 that the former president of the Irish Congress of Trade Unions (ICTU), Phil Flynn, is expected to play a key role in the new "partnership-based" industrial relations structure currently being drawn up between management and unions at Ireland's state-owned airline, Aer Lingus. Over 4,000 workers are employed by the airline and a further 1,600 by its maintenance subsidiary, TEAM.

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