Publications

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Eurofound publishes its work in a range of publication formats to match audience needs and the nature of the output. These include flagship reports on a particular area of activity, research reports summarising the findings of a research project and policy briefs presenting policy pointers from research projects or facts and figures relevant to policy debates. Also included are blog articles, regular articles on working life in Europe, presentations, working papers providing background material to ongoing or already concluded research, and reports arising from ad hoc requests by policymakers. Other corporate publications include annual reports, brochures and promotional publications. Web databases and online resources such as data visualisation applications are available in Data and resources.


  • Industrial conflict settled at Lufthansa

    On 9 April 1997, the airline company Deutsche Lufthansa AG, the Union for Public Services, Transport and Communication (Gewerkschaft Öffentliche Dienste, Transport und Verkehr, ÖTV) and the German Salaried Employees' Union (Deutsche Angestelltengewerkschaft, DAG) concluded a package deal, which ended months of industrial action. The DAG agreed to be covered by the Lufthansa-ÖTV collective agreements signed in October 1996. Furthermore, the deal provides for an increase in the profit-sharing bonus of DEM 100 and an overtime pay rise for cockpit employees. From September 1997, the trade unions have the right to terminate the wage agreements in the event that Lufthansa does not keep special rules which were jointly established. In addition, Lufthansa, the ÖTV and the DAG agreed on the continuation of the existing collective agreement which maintains the status quo for cabin crew, as well as the existing general agreement on pay grades for ground staff, for another three years.
  • Confindustria clashes with the Government over budgetary exercise

    In April 1997, the Confindustria employers' confederation organised a "virtual demonstration "of around 14,000 employers against a government exercise to raise public revenue and reduce spending by a total of ITL 15,500 billion, deemed necessary to keep Italy's 1997 budget within the parameters set by the Maastricht Treaty on European Union.
  • Commission reports on progress of social action programme

    In a recent report (/Social Europe/ 4/96, published in March/April 1997), the European Commission assesses the progress towards the achievement of the goals of the medium-term social action programme covering the period between 1995-7. This social action programme, adopted in April 1995, is seen by the Commission as marking a breakthrough for new ideas and policies. The basic concept underlying the programme is that social policy is a productive factor facilitating change and progress, rather than a burden on the economy or an obstacle to growth.
  • Krupp-Hoesch/Thyssen merger intensifies debate on future of German stakeholder capitalism

    Just one week after the German social partners and Government found a compromise on the future development of the German mining industry (DE9703104F [1]) the Ruhr region (one of Germany's oldest industrial areas) was again the focus of social conflict. On 18 March 1997 the second-largest German steel producer, Krupp-Hoesch, announced plans for a hostile takeover of its main competitor, Thyssen. Krupp-Hoesch made an offer to the Thyssen shareholders to buy their shares for DEM 435 each, which was about 25% higher than the current quotation on the German stock exchange. The president of Krupp-Hoesch, Gerhard Cromme, stated that the acquisition of Thyssen would create a lot of synergy effects, and could help to improve the international competitiveness of the German steel industry. [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/undefined/miners-revolt-ends-in-corporatist-compromise
  • Bargaining, union elections and workforce reductions in banking

    Negotiations to revise the important collective agreement in Portugal's banking sector are deadlocked. The industry's largest trade union will soon hold its elections, but its socialist members are divided, while substantial workforce reductions have been announced for the coming years.
  • Working time experiments introduced in 20 municipalities

    The Ministry of Labour has chosen 20 municipalities in different parts of Finland to participate in new forms of working time organisation on an experimental basis. Results so far have been favourable.
  • Courts play an increasing role in supervising mass redundancies

    After a legal battle lasting more than three years between the management of La Samaritaine (one of the five large Paris department stores), and its works council and CGT union branch, two rulings by the highest court in the French legal system on 13 February 1997, imposed the reinstatement of staff made redundant, as part of the cancellation of a corporate "downsizing" procedure (plan social). These rulings reveal the growing role of judges in the supervision of redundancies.
  • Companies "should justify directors' remuneration packages"

    In recent years there has been increasing public concern over what is widely viewed as the spiralling remuneration of company directors. At a time when companies are keen to promote pay schemes based on performance, too often the links between directors' pay and performance are viewed as non-existent. In a report on director's remuneration publicised in March 1997, the IOD is keen to set the record straight. It argues that, although it recognises that directors' pay in the largest companies has been on average high, it has been relatively modest for those directors who work for small to medium-sized enterprises. In fact, the median pay increase for this group of directors in 1996 was 4%, the equivalent of the increase in average earnings for all employees in that year.
  • Territorial Employment Pacts underway

    Debate about employment has resumed over the last few months in Greece, owing to an initiative to set up "Territorial Employment Pacts" (TEPs).
  • More flexibility in Sunday working

    On 19 March 1997, Parliament passed a reform of the Arbeitszeitgesetz(AZG, Working Time Act) - see Record AT9702102F [1]. This necessitated minor changes to the Arbeitsruhegesetz(ARG, Leisure Time Act) which were also passed on 19 March. However, the parliamentary Labour and Social Affairs Committee, at the behest of the social partners, had introduced wording allowing more flexibility than hitherto in regard to Sunday work, causing a major public debate in its wake. In future it will be possible for the social partners to conclude collective agreements permitting exceptions from the general ban on Sunday work. They can only do so, the law states, if it is necessary in order to avoid economic disadvantage or to safeguard employment. As far as this is feasible, the collective agreement has to specify the activities to be permissible on Sundays and the time allowed for them. Until now it was not possible to grant specific exemptions from the ban on Sunday work except if the technology required continuous production. The Minister of Labour and Social Affairs could, however, permit a whole industry to work on Sundays. [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/undefined-law-and-regulation/moves-towards-greater-working-time-flexibility

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