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  • Article
    27 Juuli 1997

    A special "holiday jobs line" set up by the young workers' secretariat of the
    Dutch Federation of Trade Unions receives complaints every day about
    violations of the recently amended law protecting young workers. In 1997, the
    Labour Inspectorate is conducting an extensive nation-wide campaign
    concerning holiday jobs.

  • Article
    27 Juuli 1997

    After a decade of their operation in Spain, active employment policies have
    led to only limited results in promoting job creation. This feature examines
    the variety of policies that have been introduced and the results of relevant
    experiments, and looks at social partners' reactions.

  • Article
    27 Juuli 1997

    The Socio-Economic Council of Flanders, the consultative body of the Flemish
    employer and employee representatives, annually submits an advisory report on
    the regional budget to the Flemish authorities. For 1998, according to the
    report, there is a "freely disposable" margin of BEF 7.4 billion (out of a
    total budget of BEF 570.4 billion). The Council has advised the Flemish
    Government to use this budgetary margin as far as possible for job creation.
    Budget surpluses in recent years have been used chiefly to reduce debt, but
    now there is a call for a policy aimed at halving unemployment in the medium
    term. Concrete measures to accomplish this will be worked out in the
    tripartite autumn bargaining round, which is intended to result in a Flemish
    Employment Act for 1998-9. The Socio-Economic Council has already expressed
    the view that Flanders spends too little on training employees and
    job-seekers in comparison with, for example, the Netherlands and Germany.

  • Article
    27 Juuli 1997

    The high unemployment rate in Finland was one of the main factors which led
    to the current national collective agreement on incomes policy, signed in
    September 1995. Both employers and trade unions would like to see a new
    centralised agreement on incomes policy to maintain economic stability as the
    Finnish Government seeks to reach the inflation target for joining EU
    Economic and Monetary Union (EMU).

  • Article
    27 Juuli 1997

    At the beginning of July 1997, Britain's largest general workers unions, GMB
    and TGWU, were calling for members in the construction industry to back
    industrial action on up to 50 "prestige" building sites, including the
    millennium dome project in London's docklands, Manchester airport and the
    Channel tunnel.

  • Article
    27 Juuli 1997

    On 1 July 1997 Germany's largest car-tyre manufacturer, Continental AG,
    announced the conclusion of a new works agreement [1] for its tyre production
    plant in Hannover-Stöcken. The new works agreement, which affects about
    2,700 employees at the Stöcken site, foresees a sharp reduction in labour
    costs mainly through:

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/efemiredictionary/works-agreement-0

  • Article
    27 Juuni 1997

    On 6 June 1997, the European Trade Union Confederation (ETUC), the Union of
    Industrial and Employers' Confederations of Europe (UNICE) and the European
    Centre of Enterprises with Public Participation and of Enterprises of General
    Economic Interest (CEEP) formally signed a European framework agreement on
    part-time work, in the presence of social affairs Commissioner Padraig Flynn,
    Dutch Prime Minister Wim Kok and Dutch Social Affairs Minister Ad Melkert.
    The agreement seeks to establish a general framework for the elimination of
    discrimination against part-time workers, and hopes to contribute towards the
    development of opportunities for part-time working on a basis which is
    acceptable to employers and workers alike. The agreement is the result of
    nine months of intense negotiation, during which success did not always
    appear likely.

  • Article
    27 Juuni 1997

    The European framework agreement on part-time work was formally signed on 6
    June 1997 (EU9706131F [1]) by the European Trade Union Confederation (ETUC),
    the Union of Industrial and Employers' Confederations of Europe (UNICE) and
    the European Centre of Enterprises with Public Participation and of
    Enterprises of General Economic Interest (CEEP). The stated purpose of the
    agreement is to remove discrimination against part time workers, improve the
    quality of part-time jobs and facilitate part-time work on a voluntary basis.
    The European Commission will propose a Directive implementing the agreement
    to the Council of Ministers later this year.

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/undefined/social-partners-reach-framework-agreement-on-part-time-work

Series

  • New forms of employment

    This series reports on the new forms of employment emerging across Europe that are driven by societal, economic and technological developments and are different from traditional standard or non-standard employment in a number of ways. This series explores what characterises these new employment forms and what implications they have for working conditions and the labour market.

  • European Company Surveys

    The European Company Survey (ECS) is carried out every four to five years since its inception in 2004–2005, with the latest edition in 2019. The survey is designed to provide information on workplace practices to develop and evaluate socioeconomic policy in the EU. It covers issues around work organisation, working time arrangements and work–life balance, flexibility, workplace innovation, employee involvement, human resource management, social dialogue, and most recently also skills use, skills strategies and digitalisation.

  • European Quality of Life Surveys

    The European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) is carried out every four to five years since its inception in 2003, with the latest edition in 2016. It examines both the objective circumstances of people's lives and how they feel about those circumstances and their lives in general. It covers issues around employment, income, education, housing, family, health and work–life balance. It also looks at subjective topics, such as people's levels of happiness and life satisfaction, and perceptions of the quality of society.

  • European Jobs Monitor

    This series brings together publications and other outputs of the European Jobs Monitor (EJM), which tracks structural change in European labour markets. The EJM analyses shifts in the employment structure in the EU in terms of occupation and sector and gives a qualitative assessment of these shifts using various proxies of job quality – wages, skill-levels, etc.

  • European Quality of Life Survey 2016

    Eurofound's European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) examines both the objective circumstances of European citizens' lives and how they feel about those circumstances and their lives in general. This series consists of outputs from the EQLS 2016, the fourth edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 2003. 

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2015

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2015, the sixth edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Working Conditions Survey 1996

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 1996, the second edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2001

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2001, which was an extension of the EWCS 2000 to cover the then 12 acceding and candidate countries. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2000

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2000, the third edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Company Survey 2004

    Eurofound’s European Company Survey (ECS) maps and analyses company policies and practices which can have an impact on smart, sustainable and inclusive growth, as well as the development of social dialogue in companies. This series consists of outputs from the first edition of the survey carried out in 2004–2005 under the name European Establishment Survey on Working Time and Work-Life Balance. 

Forthcoming publications