Publications

Eurofound publishes its work in a range of publication formats to match audience needs and the nature of the output. These include flagship reports on a particular area of activity, research reports summarising the findings of a research project and policy briefs presenting policy pointers from research projects or facts and figures relevant to policy debates. Also included are blog articles, r...Read more

Eurofound publishes its work in a range of publication formats to match audience needs and the nature of the output. These include flagship reports on a particular area of activity, research reports summarising the findings of a research project and policy briefs presenting policy pointers from research projects or facts and figures relevant to policy debates. Also included are blog articles, regular articles on working life in Europe, presentations, working papers providing background material to ongoing or already concluded research, and reports arising from ad hoc requests by policymakers. Other corporate publications include annual reports, brochures and promotional publications. Web databases and online resources such as data visualisation applications are available in Data and resources.

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Latest publications

  • Article
    27 Juuni 1999

    Territorial Employment Pacts (TEP s) are an EU initiative aimed at
    stabilising local and regional labour markets in selected European regions by
    promoting consensus and cooperation between all relevant local actors. In
    mid-1999, there are seven TEPs operational in six of Austria's nine
    provinces. The agreement on an eighth pact is expected by September 1999. In
    the two remaining provinces, Burgenland and Styria, TEPs are under
    preparation. Burgenland, which stretches along the Hungarian border, is the
    poorest province and has the highest unemployment rate, whilst Styria has the
    highest rate of long-term unemployment outside Vienna. The first three TEPs
    were initiated in the three westernmost provinces, all of which have
    relatively low unemployment. However, all three experienced a surge of
    long-term unemployment in 1997. The fourth, also initiated in 1997, covers
    Vienna [1] where unemployment is above the national average. These four pacts
    will all expire at the end of 1999 but will be renewed. The fifth pact, also
    in Vienna, and the only one linked explicitly to Austria's National Action
    Plan [2] (NAP) for employment implementing the EU Employment Guidelines [3]
    (AT9901120F [4]), took effect in autumn 1998 and will run until the end of
    2004. The shortest-term pact covers Upper Austria- it is limited to the
    calendar year 1999 but will also be renewed. The TEP in Carinthia is
    scheduled to run for four years from the beginning of 1999 to the end of
    2002. The TEP for Lower Austria will run from the beginning of 2000 until the
    end of 2004.

    [1] http://europa.eu.int/comm/pacts/en/list/63.htm
    [2] http://europa.eu.int/comm/employment_social/empl&esf/naps99/napau_en.pdf
    [3] http://europa.eu.int/comm/employment_social/empl&esf/empl99/guide_en.htm
    [4] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/labour-market-undefined/national-action-plan-on-employment-poses-challenges

  • Article
    27 Juuni 1999

    On 24 May 1999, the Trades Union Congress (TUC) held a major conference to
    promote "partnership" at the workplace and to showcase some of the more
    innovative of recent, union-based partnership agreements. The event was
    attended by some 400 managers, policymakers and trade union representatives.
    Of particular significance was the participation in the conference of the
    Prime Minister, the trade and industry secretary and the director-general of
    the Confederation of British Industry (CBI), all of whom supported the spread
    of partnership arrangements though they stopped short of endorsing every
    specific aspect of the TUC's partnership agenda.

  • Article
    27 Juuni 1999

    Italy is celebrating the Millennium with a year of "Great Jubilee"
    celebrations during 2000. In June 1999 the social partners signed a "protocol
    of intent" on a "social truce" for 2000. The text sets out the partners'
    strategies, objectives and commitments for starting the new Millennium in a
    climate of social peace.

  • Article
    27 Juuni 1999

    The management of Iveco-Pegaso, the Spanish vehicle manufacturer, will
    convert temporary posts into permanent ones, but only on condition that the
    workers' committee accepts an automatic dismissal clause for the workers on
    the new contracts in the event of a fall in production. Over May-July 1999,
    trade unions in the company organised a series of strikes in protest.

  • Article
    27 Juuni 1999

    After three weeks of industrial action, which forced the closure of the major
    national museums and historic sites, staff at France's Ministry for Culture
    protesting at job insecurity called a halt to their strike in early June
    1999, until the forthcoming budget negotiations. They accepted a protocol
    agreement, which provides for a five-year plan to turn temporary jobs into
    stable employment.

  • Article
    27 Juuni 1999

    According to an Irish Business and Employers Confederation (IBEC) survey,
    published on 22 June 1999, Irish companies are introducing a range of
    "partnership"-type measures in cooperation with their employees (IE9811264N
    [1]). The survey was based in a sample of 400 enterprises - all with 50 or
    more employees - and employing a total of 207,847 workers between them. The
    vast majority are private sector companies but there is also an unspecified
    number of commercial semi-state and non-commercial state organisations.
    Unionised and non-unionised companies are both included, across all regions,
    sectors and sizes.

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/partnership-deals-signposts-to-the-future

  • Article
    27 Juuni 1999

    In April 1999, the Dutch social partners reached agreement within the Labour
    Foundation on a framework for the further individualisation of terms of
    employment. Whilst the essential lines of collective agreements will be
    retained under the Foundation's recommendations, certain conditions of
    employment may be swapped within a company on a "multiple-choice" basis.

  • Article
    27 Juuni 1999

    On 2-6 May 1998, industrial action was organised at Arlanda airport, near
    Stockholm, by the Swedish Transport Workers' Union (Svenska
    Transportarbetareförbundet, Transport) in support of Danish workers who were
    then engaged in a major nationwide strike (DK9805168F [1]). In a blockade,
    the union's members at the airport refused to load and unload luggage, reload
    food supplies and refuel aircraft which had been diverted to Arlanda from
    Denmark (SE9805186F [2]). On 19 May 1999, the Swedish Labour Court held
    (/1999/65/) that the industrial action had been entirely in line with trade
    union procedures.

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/undefined-industrial-relations/parliament-intervenes-to-end-major-conflict
    [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/undefined/swedish-sympathy-action-for-danish-workers-challenged-in-the-labour-court

  • Article
    27 Juuni 1999

    Over the two-year period 1997-9, the social partners in Vienna and its city
    government have joined forces to develop a more innovative approach to
    Austria's most problem-ridden and least responsive labour market. In 1997 it
    contained more than half of the unemployed people whose unemployment lasted
    longer than 12 months and 42% of those whose unemployment lasted more than
    six months. The number of people registered as unemployed at some time over
    the year had risen by 1.4% over the 1996 level and made up 23% of the
    Austrian total, roughly equivalent to the capital's share in employment.
    However, the average number of people registered as unemployed stood at 29%
    of the Austrian total. Employment kept being created outside the city limits,
    centred in particular on the airport and the shopping and business parks.
    Industrial employment was continually being relocated to "greenfield" sites.
    No end to these structural disadvantages seemed in sight.

  • Article
    27 Juuni 1999

    Since coming to power in May 1997 (UK9704125F [1]), the Labour government has
    placed a strong emphasis upon skills policies. The government sees
    "upskilling" not only as an answer to problems of economic competitiveness
    and the UK's generally poor record on productivity (UK9902182F [2]), but also
    as a means of engendering greater social inclusion and cohesion. The main
    thrust of the government's skills policies over the past two years has
    centred on the education system, with further reform of the national
    curriculum in schools, a policy of "naming and shaming" schools that are seen
    to be failing, additional growth in student numbers in further and higher
    education, and an increase in educational spending. In the field of training,
    the scope and scale of changes has been more limited, but many of the
    developments here have significant implications for the social partners. Here
    we provide an overview of the most significant of these developments as they
    relate to the employed workforce (as distinct from the range of measures
    being pursued under the banner of "welfare to work" which aim to help
    unemployed people back into work via jobs, education, training or work
    experience).

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/undefined-labour-market/the-industrial-relations-consequences-of-the-new-labour-government
    [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/undefined-labour-market-business/productivity-competitiveness-and-the-knowledge-driven-economy-a-new-agenda

Series

  • European Quality of Life Survey 2003

    Eurofound’s European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) examines both the objective circumstances of European citizens' lives and how they feel about those circumstances and their lives in general. This series consists of outputs from the EQLS 2003, the first edition of the survey.

  • European Quality of Life Survey 2007

    Eurofound's European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) examines both the objective circumstances of European citizens' lives and how they feel about those circumstances and their lives in general. This series consists of outputs from the EQLS 2007, the second edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 2003.

  • European Quality of Life Survey 2012

    Eurofound's European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) examines both the objective circumstances of European citizens' lives and how they feel about those circumstances and their lives in general. This series consists of outputs from the EQLS 2012, the third edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 2003. 

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2005

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2005, the fourth edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2010

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2010, the fifth edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2020

    ​Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2020, the seventh edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • Manufacturing employment outlook

    This publication series explores scenarios for the future of manufacturing. The employment implications (number of jobs by sector, occupation, wage profile, and task content) under various possible scenarios are examined. The scenarios focus on various possible developments in global trade and energy policies and technological progress and run to 2030.

Forthcoming publications