Czech Republic: Developments in collectively agreed pay 2013

  • Observatory: EurWORK
  • Topic:
  • Agreements,
  • Collective bargaining,
  • Rémunération et revenu,
  • Working conditions,
  • Relations industrielles,
  • Published on: 05 Juin 2014



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Disclaimer: This information is made available as a service to the public but has not been edited by the European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions. The content is the responsibility of the authors.

1 – General collectively agreed pay increases

1.1 Indexation of salaries

1.1.1 Is a mechanism on wage indexation in place in your country? If so, please briefly describe the main features (name of agreement/law, is it the basis for further agreements, who makes the agreements…).

There is no mechanism on wage indexation in place in the Czech Republic.

1.2 Central agreements or minimum increases set by government covering ‘the whole’ or major parts of the economy

In some countries major (cross-sectoral) agreements between social partners or minimum increases prescribed by government exist which cover either ‘the whole’ or major parts of the economy and serve as a basis for further agreements to be made at different levels.

1.2.1 If there is such an agreement in your country, please provide the name of the agreement.

There are no agreements between social partners or minimum increases set by government covering the whole or major parts of the Czech economy.

1.2.10 Please provide any additional comments.

There are no central agreements or minimum increases set by government covering the whole or major parts of the Czech economy, as already mentioned above. The government in CZ determines the amount of the monthly or hourly minimum wage (not the amount of a minimum wage increase). The minimum-wage level was increased to the level 8,500 CZK from 1st August 2013 (see the section 3 on minimal wages).

A higher than the government defined level of minimum wage can be stipulated in collective agreements, both the company-level and higher-level ones. This opportunity is actually used by company-level collective agreements only. The share of CLCAs (of the total number of the CLCAs included in the Working Conditions Information System, ISPP) containing an employer’s obligation to pay the monthly minimum wage higher than the wage defined by the government decree, reaches actually 12% according to the ISPP data. Such a provision for 2013 was contained in  12.1% CLCAs, for 2012 in 8.5% CLCAs. According to the ISPP, a higher than by the government defined hourly minimum wage was agreed in 4.7% CLCAs in 2013 and in 4.4% CLCAs in 2012. 

1.3 Sectoral pace or trend setting agreements

In some countries major sectoral agreements serve as pace-setting agreements, i.e. the negotiated increases are then taken in other sectors as well.

1.3.1 If there is such an agreement in your country, please provide the name of the agreement.

There are not such agreements in the Czech Republic.

1.4 ‘Average’ of collectively agreed pay increases as evidenced in databases or surveys

1.4.1 Is there in your country a statistical source, which allows the calculation of weighted or non-weighted averages of collectively agreed pay rises across major parts of the economy? If so, please report what was the average collectively agreed increase per annum stemming from this database (from 2012 to 2013 and from 2011 to 2012)

Informační systém o pracovních podmínkách, ISPP (Working Conditions Information System, ISPP) http://www.mpsv.cz/cs/3390 (based on1,324 agreements concluded within private sector)

from 2012 to 2013:

2.8%, nominal wages, CLCAs, ISPP data, private sectors only

1.8%, real wages, CLCAs, ISPP data, private-sectors only.

from 2011 to 2012:

2.8%, nominal wages, CLCAs, ISPP data, private sectors only

2.0%, real wages, CLCAs, ISPP data, private-sectors only.

1.4.2 For countries where indexation of salaries (section 1.1): Does the average increase reported above include the increase by indexation?

n/a

Table 1.4A: Metadata for average figures for the whole economy derived from databases

Name of the statistical source

Informační systém o pracovních podmínkách, ISPP (Working Conditions Information System, ISPP)

Weblink to the statistical source

http://www.mpsv.cz/en/3390 (in English) or http://www.kolektivnismlouvy.cz/indexEN.html (Trexima Ltd.)

How are the data collected? Is it a sample of agreements or a full register?

The ISPP is a regular annual survey on working conditions, including wages, agreed in collective agreements for the relevant year. It has been carried out under the control of the Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs, MoLSA (Ministerstvo práce a sociálních věcí) since 1993. The purpose of the survey is to map and analyse collective bargaining in CZ. The survey does not include all the company collective agreements in the given period, but only an available sample of them (likely most of them).

Input of data are acquired into the system electronically by means of the acquisition programme EKS, which is used by individual trade unions (26) or by direct collection of collective agreements.

In 2013 selected data about wage and working conditions were analysed from 1,727 collective agreements (of which 1,324 agreements were from the private sector) from 26 different trade unions (TU), which represented more than 903 thousand employees.

Is the sample or register updated every year? For a sample: does it contain a ‘panel’ of certain agreements, which are followed over time, or are new agreements added and others left out?

This is rather a sample of trade unions and organisations updated every year which contains a “panel” of certain CLCA´s (the vast majority of them are the same every year).

Are the following types of agreements covered in the database?

What is the rate of coverage of the following, in percentage terms?

Calculations of average increases

1.4.3 Please provide any additional comments.

The data in the ISPP represent the average of the year-on-year percentage increase in the nominal monthly wage, or real monthly wage, contained in available CLCAs concluded for 2012, or for 2011, respectively, private sectors only.

In 2013 the wage increase is dealt with, according to the ISPP, in 59.4% of the CLCAs covered by the survey, which represents a 0.3% decrease compared with 2012. The wage increase is not shown just by one single piece of data in the CLCAs, but it is expressed in several different ways. Next to the above-mentioned increase in the average nominal or real wage, the obligation to increase wages is expressed in the form of an increase of wage scales (20.4% CLCAs, increase of wage scales by 2.8% on average), or by an increase of the total volume of wage funds (6.8% CLCAs).

2 – Pay increases related to three sectors

This section aims to gather data on collectively agreed pay increases/pay increases set by law related to the three sectors:

  • Chemicals
  • Retail and
  • the Civil service.
  1. Is there a database which records the collective agreements for the different sectors? If such a database is available, which allows you to give an “average” of collectively agreed pay increase, please report this in the first place. If this is available, no further factsheets need to be reported.
  2. In case such an “average” figure does not exist, please report “the most important” collective agreement or pay set by law.

2.1 Outcomes of sector related pay setting: CHEMICALS SECTOR

2.1.1 What was the nominal collectively agreed pay increase (a) from 2012 to 2013 and (b) from 2011 to 2012

from 2012 to 2013: 2.9%, CLCAs, nominal wages

from 2011 to 2012: 2.7 %, CLCAs, nominal wages

2.1.2 To what exact periods do these changes refer?

to calendar year

2.1.3 Please describe if and how wage bargaining/setting within the sector is coordinated within the sector (i.e. sector and company level), with institutions outside the sector (e.g. peak level organisations) and possibly also across sectors.

In the sector of chemistry is regularly conducted one higher level collective agreement (HLCA) valid usually for two years, incl. annual Annexes. HLCA is signed by social partners: Association of Chemical Industry of the Czech Republic (Svaz chemického průmyslu ČR, SCHP ČR) and Trade Union of Chemical and Energy Workers (OS ECHO-chemical section) as the peak level organisations within this sector. No national level exist and a both partners act independently. During last quarter of validity of old agreement are initiated negotiations on new high-level collective agreement. This HLCA provides the framework and guidance for the conclusion of several tens of CLCAs in chemical and pharmaceutical companies.

Collective agreements are conducted on sectoral (subsectors chemistry and pharma, NACE 20.1-20.6, 21.-21.2) and company level only. Individually signed CLCAs are reported to TU ECHO and this TU reports data about CLCAs to the database ISPP (Working Conditions Information System).

Table 2.1A: Metadata for average figures for the chemicals sector derived from databases

• Agreements from different levels of bargaining (company, subsector, sectoral level).

No, company level collective agreements only.

• Agreements made by certain unions or employers’ organisations.

yes

• Agreements made within certain sectors.

yes

• Agreements made within specific types of companies.

yes

The number of collective wage agreements in the database in relation to all collective wage agreements in the whole economy.

36.4 % (rough estimation)

1,727 CLCAs in the database (within Českomoravská konfederace odborových svazů, ČMKOS only) / 4,739 CLCAs in total

Source: ČMKOS, Report on the progress of collective bargaining at a higher level and company level in 2013.

The number of employees covered by the collective wage agreements listed in the database (including those through extension) in relation to all employees covered by collective wage agreements (including those through extension) in the whole economy.

33 % (valid for the largest Trade Union Confederation ČMKOS only)

The concluded company collective agreements (CLCAs) apply to 1.348 million employees, around 33% of the 3,988.2 thousands registered employees in the CZ.

The number of companies covered by the collective wage agreements listed in the database (independent of the bargaining level and including those companies to which the agreements are extended) in relation to the number of all companies in the economy covered by a collective wage agreement.

n. a. (no valid data for estimation)

Any other coverage rate available from the database, which might not fall under one of the above definitions.

n/a

Are the reported averages weighted, and if so, based on which weights (for example, employees, companies, payrolls and so on)?

No (not weighted averages in the ISPP)

How are collective agreements that are valid in more than one year treated?

There are no data for it,

mainly are concluded one year CLCAs.

Are agreed lump sum payments taken into account?

No.

Are collective agreements that have not been renewed part of the average?

No, no such CAs within the number of 1727 CLCAs

Any other relevant information in relation to the calculation of percentage increases?

No.

Name of the statistical source

Informační systém o pracovních podmínkách, ISPP (Working Conditions Information System, ISPP)

Weblink to the statistical source

http://www.mpsv.cz/en/3390

How are the data collected? Is it a sample of agreements or a full register?

The ISPP is a regular annual survey on working conditions, including wages, agreed in collective agreements for the relevant year. It has been carried out under the control of the Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs, MoLSA (Ministerstvo práce a sociálních věcí) since 1993. The purpose of the survey is to map and analyse collective bargaining in CZ. The survey does not include all the company collective agreements in the given period, but only an available sample of them (likely most of them).

Input of data are acquired into the system electronically by means of the acquisition programme EKS, which is used by individual trade unions (26) or by direct collection of collective agreements.

In 2013 selected data about wage and working conditions were analysed from 1,727 collective agreements (of which 1,324 agreements were from the private sector) from 26 different trade unions (TU), which represented more than 903 thousand employees.

Is the sample or register updated every year? For a sample: does it contain a ‘panel’ of certain agreements, which are followed over time, or are new agreements added and others left out?

This is rather a sample of trade unions and organisations updated every year which contains a “panel” of certain CLCA´s (the vast majority of them are the same every year).

Are the following types of agreements covered in the database?

What is the rate of coverage of the following, in percentage terms?

Calculations of average increases

Which bargaining levels exist in the sector?

2.1.4 Please provide any additional comments.

2.2 Outcomes of sector related pay setting: Retail sector

2.2.1 What was the nominal collectively agreed pay increase (a) from 2012 to 2013 and (b) from 2011 to 2012

from 2012 to 2013: no data for retail sector available

from 2011 to 2012: 2.1%, CLCAs, nominal wages

2.2.2 To what exact periods do these changes refer?

to calendar year

2.2.3 Please describe if and how wage bargaining/setting within the sector is coordinated within the sector (i.e. sector and company level), with institutions outside the sector (e.g. peak level organisations) and possibly also across sectors.

In the retail sector is regularly conducted one HLCA with duration of two years (actually for the years 2013-2014) by social partners: Czech Confederation of Commerce and Tourism (Svaz obchodu a cestovního ruchu ČR, SOCR) and Trade Union of Workers in Commerce (OS pracovníků obchodu, OSPO), which are the only peak level organisations within this sector. No national level exist and a both partners act independently. During last quarter of validity of agreement are initiated negotiations on new collective agreement (mainly during autumn). This HLCA provides the framework and guidance for the conclusion of ca. 65 CLCAs in commerce.

Collective agreements are conducted on more-sectoral (Retail, wholesale, hotels, travel agencies, universities, vocational schools, NACE 46.1 – 46.9, 47.1-47.9, 55.1-55.9, 56.1-56.3, 79.1, 85.3, 85.4) and company level only. Individually signed CLCAs are reported to TU OSPO and this TU reports data about CLCAs to the database ISPP (Working Conditions Information System).

Table 2.2A: Metadata for average figures for the retail sector derived from databases

• Agreements from different levels of bargaining (company, subsector, sectoral level).

Both company and sectoral level

• Agreements made by certain unions or employers’ organisations.

Yes

• Agreements made within certain sectors.

Yes

• Agreements made within specific types of companies.

No

The number of collective wage agreements in the database in relation to all collective wage agreements in the whole economy.

38 CLCAs within TU ECHO / 4739 (within ČMKOS only)=0,8 %

The number of employees covered by the collective wage agreements listed in the database (including those through extension) in relation to all employees covered by collective wage agreements (including those through extension) in the whole economy.

Ca. 27,000 employees within TU ECHO (2013)

27,000/1348065=2 % (within ČMKOS only)

The number of companies covered by the collective wage agreements listed in the database (independent of the bargaining level and including those companies to which the agreements are extended) in relation to the number of all companies in the economy covered by a collective wage agreement.

38 companies within TU ECHO

n. a.

Are the reported averages weighted, and if so, based on which weights (for example, employees, companies, payrolls and so on)?

No.

How are collective agreements that are valid for more than 12 months treated?

In this case is conducted wage increase valid for example for both these 2 years

Are agreed lump sum payments taken into account?

No

Are collective agreements that have not been renewed part of the average?

No

Central agreement (national level, cross-sectoral covering more than three broad sectors).

No.

At sectoral or subsectoral (branch) level (multi-employer agreement).

Yes

Regional level

No

At company level (single-employer agreement, including cases where more agreements cover a number of companies).

Yes

Name of the statistical source

Informační systém o pracovních podmínkách, ISPP (Working Conditions Information System, ISPP)

Weblink to the statistical source

http://www.mpsv.cz/en/3390

How are the data collected? Is it a sample of agreements or a full register?

The ISPP is a regular annual survey on working conditions, including wages, agreed in collective agreements for the relevant year. It has been carried out under the control of the Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs, MoLSA (Ministerstvo práce a sociálních věcí) since 1993. The purpose of the survey is to map and analyse collective bargaining in CZ. The survey does not include all the company collective agreements in the given period, but only an available sample of them (likely most of them).

Input of data are acquired into the system electronically by means of the acquisition programme EKS, which is used by individual trade unions (26) or by direct collection of collective agreements.

In 2013 selected data about wage and working conditions were analysed from 1,727 collective agreements (of which 1,324 agreements were from the private sector) from 26 different trade unions (TU), which represented more than 903 thousand employees.

Is the sample or register updated every year? For a sample: does it contain a ‘panel’ of certain agreements, which are followed over time, or are new agreements added and others left out?

This is rather a sample of trade unions and organisations updated every year which contains a “panel” of certain CLCA´s (the vast majority of them are the same every year).

Are the following types of agreements covered in the database?

What is the rate of coverage of the following, in percentage terms?

Calculations of average increases

Which bargaining levels exist in the sector?

2.2.4 Please provide any additional comments.

2.3 Outcomes of sector related pay setting: Civil service

2.3.1 What was the nominal collectively agreed pay increase (a) from 2012 to 2013 and (b) from 2011 to 2012

from 2012 to 2013: no data for civil service available

from 2011 to 2012: no data for civil service available

2.3.2 To what exact periods do these changes refer?

to calendar year

2.3.3 Please describe if and how wage bargaining/setting within the sector is coordinated within the sector (i.e. sector and company level), with institutions outside the sector (e.g. peak level organisations) and possibly also across sectors.

Within Civil Service sector are concluded only individual CLCAs in individual offices or subordinate organizations. No HLCAs were concluded in the given sector. No central agreement and no peak organisation for CB exist. Salaries and wages are setting by law and by government implementing regulations.

As regards CLCAs concluded in the sector, they could define wage conditions in a relatively small extent only. Wage conditions of employees in the sector are stipulated by law and, following it, by the Czech government resolution.

ISPP database as well as the survey outputs from ISPP do not included any data on wages as far as civil service offices are concerned. The reason is the fact that generally binding legal regulations leave no room for collective agreements to stipulate the wage development.

Table 2.3A: Metadata for average figures for the civil service sector derived from databases

• Agreements from different levels of bargaining (company, subsector, sectoral level).

No

• Agreements made by certain unions or employers’ organisations.

Yes

• Agreements made within certain sectors.

Yes

• Agreements made within specific types of companies.

Yes

The number of collective wage agreements in the database in relation to all collective wage agreements in the whole economy.

65 CLCAs (2013)

n. a.

The number of employees covered by the collective wage agreements listed in the database (including those through extension) in relation to all employees covered by collective wage agreements (including those through extension) in the whole economy.

65 CLCAs cover 75,000 employees (2013) (within ČMKOS only)

One HLCA covers 52,000 employees (2013) – not in the database ISPP

Source: ČMKOS

n. a.

The number of companies covered by the collective wage agreements listed in the database (independent of the bargaining level and including those companies to which the agreements are extended) in relation to the number of all companies in the economy covered by a collective wage agreement.

Approx. 65 companies (CLCAs)

n. a.

Are the reported averages weighted, and if so, based on which weights (for example, employees, companies, payrolls and so on)?

No.

How are collective agreements that are valid in more than one year treated?

One concluded HLCA valid for two years and CLCAs are valid for one year.

Are agreed lump sum payments taken into account?

No

Are collective agreements that have not been renewed part of the average?

No

Any other relevant information in relation to the calculation of percentage increases?

No

Central agreement (national level, cross-sectoral covering more than three broad sectors).

Yes (retail, tourism, hotels)

At sectoral or subsectoral (branch) level (multi-employer agreement).

No

Regional level

No

At company level (single-employer agreement, including cases where more agreements cover a number of companies).

Yes

Name of the statistical source

Informační systém o pracovních podmínkách, ISPP (Working Conditions Information System, ISPP)

Weblink to the statistical source

http://www.mpsv.cz/en/3390

How are the data collected? Is it a sample of agreements or a full register?

The ISPP is a regular annual survey on working conditions, including wages, agreed in collective agreements for the relevant year. It has been carried out under the control of the Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs, MoLSA (Ministerstvo práce a sociálních věcí) since 1993. The purpose of the survey is to map and analyse collective bargaining in CZ. The survey does not include all the company collective agreements in the given period, but only an available sample of them (likely most of them).

Input of data are acquired into the system electronically by means of the acquisition programme EKS, which is used by individual trade unions (26) or by direct collection of collective agreements.

In 2013 selected data about wage and working conditions were analysed from 1,727 collective agreements (of which 1,324 agreements were from the private sector) from 26 different trade unions (TU), which represented more than 903 thousand employees.

Note: No data available for civil service sector.

Is the sample or register updated every year? For a sample: does it contain a ‘panel’ of certain agreements, which are followed over time, or are new agreements added and others left out?

This is rather a sample of trade unions and organisations updated every year which contains a “panel” of certain CLCA´s (the vast majority of them are the same every year).

Table 2.3B: Metadata for individual agreements / law for the civil service sector

Name of the agreement

No list or overview of individual concluded CLCAs exist.

Who are the signatory parties?

In general: director or managing director /Chairman of trade union in office, ministry, subordinated office.

Duration of the agreement in months.

1 year

Period of validity (day/month/year).

1.1. – 31.12.

Is the agreement extended to non-affiliated employees or companies?

No

What happens when the agreement expires?

During last quarter of validity of agreement are initiated negotiations on new collective agreement (mainly during autumn).

Which bargaining levels exist in the sector?

At what level has the agreement been concluded?

Scope of agreement(s) in terms of employees

Scope of agreement(s) in terms of companies

Sectoral scope of the agreement

2.3.4 Please provide any additional comments.

3 – National minimum wages

This section aims to gather information on the developments and discussions regarding national minimum wages set by law or agreement, with respect to full adult rate and the youth rate.

3.1 What was the absolute level of the national gross minimum wage in national currency in 2012 and 2013.

Basic minimum wage rate, for a specified 40-hour working week, in 2013 (valid from 1st August):

CZK 8,500 (monthly rate), CZK 50.60 (rate per day).

Basic minimum wage rate, for a specified 40-hour working week, in 2012:

CZK 8,000 (monthly, CZK 48.10 (rate per day).

3.2 What was the increase (in %) of the national gross minimum wage between 2012 and 2013?

Year-to-year increase was 6.25 % between 2013 and 2012.

3.4 Was there a national minimum wage for specific groups (e.g. youth) in place in 2013? What % of the full rate is paid for these groups?

No special rate for specific groups of employees wasn´t valid in 2013 (previous special rates were

cancelled as of 1st January 2013).

3.6 How was the minimum wage determined in 2013? What was the involvement of social partners in the determination of the minimum wage?

New higher level of gross minimum wage valid from 1.8. 2013 was determined by governmental

regulation No. 210/2013 Coll. Final compromise level of minimum wage was the result of

prolonged negotiations on the amount between the main social partners and government

representatives in the Council of Economic and Social Agreement in 2013 and during the previous

year 2012.

3.7 Please describe any discussions or debates involving governments, social partners, or other relevant organisations about the national minimum wage (and the minimum wage for young workers) which took place during 2013.

The minimum wage for 2013 was further discussed by the national tripartite organisation, Council of Economic and Social Agreement (Rada hospodářské a sociální dohody ČR, RHSD). Whereas the Czech biggest peak union organisation, Czech-Moravian Confederation of Trade Unions (Českomoravská konfederace odborových svazů, ČMKOS) asked for (referring to the long-term decrease in the real value of minimum wage) an increase in the basic rate by 15% and another representative of trade unions in the national tripartite organisation, Association of Independent Trade Unions (Asociace samostatných odborů, ASO), pushed for a 6% increase, employer representatives in RHSD ČR, i.e. Confederation of Industry (Svaz průmyslu a dopravy, SP ČR) and Confederation of Employer and Entrepreneur Associations (Konfederace zaměstnavatelských a podnikatelských svazů ČR, KZPS ČR, were by far more modest in their proposals (increase CZK 400 only). As for the representative of the state, MoLSA proposed an increase in the basic rate of minimum wage amounting to CZK 500 as a compromise. The successive government of Jiří Rusnok increased the minimum wage by governmental regulation from 16.7.2013 at the level CZK 8,500 (valid from 1st August 2013).

3.8 Please provide any additional comments, if required.

Note: Increase of minimum wage was enforced after 6 years and 7 months (last change on 1.1.2007).

On the basis of the actual method for estimating the number of employees remunerated at the level of the minimum wage, we can deduce that this is 2.5% of all employees in 2011 and 1.9% in 2012 (Source: Trexima Ltd. Zlín, producer of ISPP).

4. Country information on wage bargaining

This section aims to update the information on wage bargaining that is available per country on the website ef/observatories/eurwork/collective-wage-bargaining/country-info?country_tid=13837 in section ‘On wage bargaining’.

4.1 Does the paragraph on Bargaining system reflect the current state? If not, please provide here an updated version.

Collective wage bargaining occurred during the reference period both at the company and the sector level. The dominant level of collective bargaining in the Czech Republic is the company level. According to a recent report by the trade union confederation ČMKOS on the course of collective bargaining at a high level and the company level in 2013, a total of 620,665 employees are covered by higher level collective agreements (HLCAs), including those covered by extension.

The closed HLCAs serve as a framework or guideline to determine the form of company collective agreements in the sector. On the whole, there were no major changes between 1998 and 2013. Enforceability of agreed collective agreements is usually weak and actually achieved annual increases in wages are evaluated by trade unions, usually twice a year. The government influences wage bargaining outcomes indirectly through minimum wages, tax measures and any increase in civil servants’ salaries. Legal provision for mandatory extension is available, but not widely used.

4.2 Does the paragraph on Timing reflect the current state? If not, please provide here an updated version.

The vast majority of negotiations on a new collective agreement (or amendment to a collective agreement) begin in the fourth quarter of the year. Contracts are signed mostly in the period between December and January the next year. This applies to bargaining at the company level and at the sector level.

13 HLCAs out of 19 HLCAs with registered validity in 2013 were signed for a period of two and more years. In addition, 5 HLCAs (of which two CLCAs were signed for a period of two years) were concluded within the trade unions outside the ČMKOS.

Company-level collective agreements are usually concluded for a period of one year.

4.3 Does the paragraph on Derogation reflect the current state? If not, please provide here an updated version.

no change of this paragraph

4.4 Please write a short background text (max. 150 words) on extension mechanisms in your country.

Extension of the binding nature of higher level collective agreements (HLCA) to another employer is governed by the provisions in section 7 and section 7a of the Act No. 2/1991 Coll., on collective bargaining. The proposal to extend the biding nature of HLCAs must be submitted by both parties/social partners and on the condition that at least one of them must be, in terms of membership, the largest trade union in the sector for which the extension is proposed. If all the conditions are laid down by law, the biding nature of a given HLCA will be extended to other employers with prevailing/principal business activities in the sector, as defined by the CZ-NACE classification code, regardless of whether there is a trade union organization or not.

The process of extending the scope of HLCAs is described on the MoLSA website: http://www.mpsv.cz/cs/1505

Information about the content of HLCAs which were extended is available in the Labour Offices and on the MoLSA website available at: http://www.mpsv.cz/cs/3856 (only in Czech).

An extension is actually registered in 6 HLCAs out of 19 conducted and registered HLCAs.

Petr Pojer, Research Institute for Labour and Social Research (RILSA)

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