Publications

Search results: 1014 items found
  • Article
    17 Janvier 2010

    The European framework agreement on harassment and violence at work (4.7Mb
    PDF) [1] (*EU0705019I* [2]), concluded on 27 April 2007, requires that
    employer organisations and trade unions cooperate on the improvement of
    working conditions by establishing and promoting mechanisms to eliminate
    harassment and violence occurring at company level.

    [1] http://www.tradeunionpress.eu/Agreement%20violence/Framework%20Agreement%20Harassment%20and%20Violence%20at%20Work2.pdf
    [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/social-partner-sign-agreement-to-combat-harassment-and-violence-at-work

  • Article
    17 Janvier 2010

    According to the Support for Unemployed Persons and Persons Seeking
    Employment Law (110Kb MS Word doc) [1] (passed in 2004) to encourage the
    involvement of unemployed persons in the labour market, the government seeks
    to promote active labour market measures and preventive measures with the aim
    of reducing unemployment. In November 2009, the registered unemployment rate
    in Latvia amounted to 15.1% or 169,300 people. Significant differences in
    unemployment emerge when measured by region: 42% of all registered unemployed
    people are registered in the capital city Riga and its surrounding region.
    This is determined by the historical concentration of a higher amount of
    residents and business activities in the Riga region – the region accounts
    for about 60% of Latvia’s gross domestic product (GDP). However, the
    unemployment level in the Riga region is third lowest in Latvia at 11.5%.

    [1] http://www.ttc.lv/export/sites/default/docs/LRTA/Likumi/Support_for_Unemployed_Persons_and_Persons_Seeking_Employment_Law.doc

  • Article
    17 Janvier 2010

    In recent months, the three main political parties in the United Kingdom have
    proposed cuts in public spending that they consider necessary to restore the
    public finances to health. However, the parties’ proposals differ in the
    extent of the cuts and the ways in which they would be achieved.

  • Article
    17 Janvier 2010

    In an effort to address and moderate the effects of the global economic
    crisis on the Cypriot economy, the government has introduced a package of
    measures, which it finalised in early November 2009. A number of these
    measures are a continuation of previous initiatives, which have been extended
    until the crisis eases. It is likely that, in the coming months, the
    introduction of additional measures will be approved. In this context and
    referring to the measures seeking to support employment, the Minister of
    Labour and Social Insurance, Sotiroula Charalambous, highlighted that the
    measures will be evaluated and readjusted depending on how the crisis
    develops.

  • Article
    17 Janvier 2010

    In July and August 2009, the National Labour Inspectorate (Národný
    inšpektorát práce, NIP [1]) carried out checks to examine the working
    conditions of road transport drivers. These conditions are stipulated under
    Act No. 462/2007 Coll. on the organisation of working time in the transport
    sector, as well as under Regulation (EC) No. 561/2006 [2] of the European
    Parliament and Council on the harmonisation of certain social legislation
    relating to road transport. This legislation regulates areas including the
    maximum working time [3], breaks at work, minimum rest periods [4] and night
    work [5], as well as specifying the control competencies of state inspection
    bodies.

    [1] http://www.narodnyinspektoratprace.sk/
    [2] http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=CELEX:32006R0561:EN:HTML
    [3] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/industrial-relations-dictionary/working-time
    [4] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/industrial-relations-dictionary/rest-periods
    [5] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/industrial-relations-dictionary/night-work

  • Article
    17 Janvier 2010

    At the request of the Ministry of Social Security and Labour (Socialinės
    apsaugos ir darbo ministerija, SADM [1]), a joint research group conducted a
    survey in 2008 analysing parents’ needs for ensuring the welfare of their
    families. The methodology used was a representative survey of households with
    children under 18 years of age, which was carried out by the public opinion
    and market research company Spinter Tyrimai (Spinter [2]). In the survey,
    some 1,002 respondents were interviewed in different regions of the country;
    71.6% were women and 28.4% were men. A multi-stage stratified random sampling
    was used for the selection of the respondents.

    [1] http://www.socmin.lt
    [2] http://www.spinter.lt/

  • Article
    17 Janvier 2010

    In 2008, the government undertook a series of initiatives aiming to better
    regulate migration, including the adoption of a migration strategy
    (BG0711029I [1]). The Ministry of Labour and Social Policy
    (Министерство на труда и социалната
    политика, MLSP [2]) hosted job fairs in Spain and Greece where the
    largest migrant populations of Bulgarians in the EU live (BG0807019I [3]).
    The main aim of this move was to establish links between migrants and
    Bulgarian employers and to encourage return migration to Bulgaria.

    [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/social-partners-call-for-improvements-to-migration-policy
    [2] http://www.mlsp.government.bg
    [3] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/labour-market-undefined/employment-experiences-of-bulgarian-migrant-workers

  • Article
    14 Janvier 2010

    Two recent rulings by the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR [1]) state
    that the exercise of the right to form and join trade unions includes the
    right to collective bargaining [2] and the right to strike [3]. The judgement
    in the first case, Demir and Baykara v. Turkey (Application No. 34503/97
    [4]), was delivered on 12 November 2008. At the time when the Tum Bel Sen
    trade union was formed – as the union representing civil servants in Turkey
    – Turkish law did not permit civil service trade unionism, although a
    collective agreement negotiated between the union and the employer was in
    operation for two years before it was annulled. Demir and Baykara,
    representing the trade union and its members, claimed at the ECHR that the
    right to collectively bargain was contained within Article 11 of the European
    Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms [5].
    This article states:

    [1] http://www.echr.coe.int/echr/Homepage_EN
    [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/industrial-relations-dictionary/collective-bargaining
    [3] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/industrial-relations-dictionary/right-to-strike
    [4] http://vlex.com/vid/case-demir-and-baykara-v-turkey-51456848
    [5] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/industrial-relations-dictionary/european-convention-for-the-protection-of-human-rights-and-fundamental-freedoms

  • NC
    14 Janvier 2010

    The aim of this representativeness study is to identify the respective national and supranational actors (i.e. trade unions and employer organisations) in the field of industrial relations in the civil aviation industry in Belgium. In order to determine their relative importance in the sector’s industrial relations, this study will, in particular, focus on their representational quality as well as on their role in collective bargaining.