Publications

735 items found

Eurofound publishes its work in a range of publication formats to match audience needs and the nature of the output. These include flagship reports on a particular area of activity, research reports summarising the findings of a research project and policy briefs presenting policy pointers from research projects or facts and figures relevant to policy debates. Also included are blog articles, regular articles on working life in Europe, presentations, working papers providing background material to ongoing or already concluded research, and reports arising from ad hoc requests by policymakers. Other corporate publications include annual reports, brochures and promotional publications. Web databases and online resources such as data visualisation applications are available in Data and resources.


  • Dispute over wage cuts and privatisation at Dunaferr steel mill

    As a part of its proposal for the 2003 state budget, the coalition government of the Hungarian Socialist Party [1] (Magyar Szocialista Párt, MSZP) and the liberal Alliance of Free Democrats [2] (Szabad Demokraták Szövetsége, SZDSZ) has announced far-reaching privatisation plans, and for this purpose drafted an amendment to the law on privatisation. Since the vast majority of the firms in manufacturing, construction and commerce had already been privatised under the previous socialist-liberal government between 1994 and 1998, the new wave of company sales mainly affects firms in agriculture, finance and transportation. The only exception in manufacturing is Dunaferr, the only remaining Hungarian steel mill, which survived the transformation recession of the early 1990s, and is still one of the largest employers in Hungary. Although in the early 1990s this state enterprise was decentralised into several limited liability companies, and some smaller units were sold to foreign investors, the state is still the majority owner. [1] http://www.mszp.hu/ [2] http://www.szdsz.hu/
  • Government supports working time reduction

    The reduction of working time is increasingly becoming a central bargaining demand for Hungarian trade unions at national level. Regular weekly working time is a central issue in the current round of tripartite negotiations over increases in the national minimum wage (HU0207102F [1]) and recommendations for the annual wage increase for 2003. In exchange for making concessions to the employers’ side in the area of wage increases, unions have demanded the reduction of statutory normal weekly working time from 40 hours to 39.5 hours in 2003, and to 38 hours by 2006. [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/new-government-increases-public-sector-pay-and-low-wage-earners-income
  • MSZOSZ congress launches major structural reform

    The National Association of Hungarian Trade Unions [1] (Magyar Szakszervezetek Országos Szövetsége, MSZOSZ), one of the major Hungarian trade union confederations, held its fifth congress on 22 and 23 November 2002 in Budapest. The congress aimed to end a period of lack of strategic focus and decided to develop a new organisational structure which will enable it to tackle the challenges of forthcoming EU membership and the accompanying efforts to strengthen social dialogue across the Hungarian economy. [1] http://www.mszosz.hu/
  • Agreement reached following action in road haulage

    Difficult negotiations between trade unions and employers' associations in the French road haulage industry began in October 2002 over a new sectoral collective agreement on pay and conditions. The prospect of a blockade of the entire road network similar to that of 1996, if the talks failed, hung over the negotiations. Ultimately, an agreement was reached on 24 November, providing for a pay increase 14% over three years, though it was not signed by the CFDT and CGT unions, which called for roadblocks to be set up. These were lifted on 25 November, but CFDT and CGT plan to continue their action in other forms.
  • Return to calm at CFTC congress

    After clashes at its 1999 congress, the French Christian Workers' Confederation (CFTC) held its 48th national congress in November 2002 against a more peaceful backdrop. A new executive team headed by Jacques Voisin and Jacky Dintinger was elected, which is promoting the expansion of CFTC's presence, especially in small and medium-sized companies.
  • Mass redundancies in telecommunications

    Telecommunications companies, and especially those that are mainly engaged in mobile telephony, are in the midst of a serious crisis in Denmark. In early November 2002, a confidential report from the new top management of the Danish division of Orange, the French-owned mobile telephone company, was leaked to the press. The report recommended large-scale redundancies in connection with a major restructuring process. This leak immediately led to the dismissals of some of the employees who had received the report. Shortly afterwards, management publicly stated that 400 out of 1,000 employees would be made redundant as part of a major economic restructuring process. The employees were informed at a number of meetings, and Orange has taken the initiative to launch negotiations over the job losses with employee representatives, and has informed the Confederation of Danish Industries (Dansk Industri, DI).
  • Employment levels start to fall

    The November 2002 employment survey from Statistics Denmark (Danmarks Statistik), conducted on the basis of employers’ payments into the ATP (labour market supplementary pension) system, shows that 20,200 people lost full-time jobs from the second to the third quarter of 2002. This was 15,500 more people than expected by experts in the labour market field. The situation is worst in the industrial sector, in which employment fell by 6,700, and in the building sector, where 5,100 jobs were lost. In the municipal sector, employment fell by about 3,400. On the whole, public sector employment declined by 6,400, while the private sector suffered a loss of 13,500.
  • New law passed on temporary agency work

    On 15 November 2002, the German parliament (Bundestag) passed a package of bills entitled 'Modern services on the labour market [1]', which partly implements the proposals of the Hartz Commission, issued in August 2002. The Hartz Commission was established by Chancellor Gerhard Schröder to recommend reforms aimed at a modernisation of Germany’s labour market policy and thus a reduction in the high level of unemployment (DE0209205F [2]). Through the new legislation, Wolfgang Clement, the minister for employment and economic policy (DE0211205F [3]), aims to create up to 50,000 jobs by the expansion of temporary agency work in 2004. [1] http://eng.bundesregierung.de/dokumente/Artikel/ix_450282_4317.htm [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/sweeping-modernisation-of-labour-market-policy-proposed [3] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/implications-of-the-new-red-green-government-for-industrial-relations
  • Pay norm under debate

    In late 2002, the Belgian social partners are discussing a new intersectoral agreement for 2003-4. The maximum margins for growth in wage costs over the next two years are central to the talks. In early November, the Central Economic Council published its technical report providing an indication of the pay norm, which it puts at 5.1%. This procedure, which is particularly complicated on this occasion, has relaunched debate on Belgium's pay norm system.
  • Agreement on combating illegal working in the construction sector

    In October 2002, the Ministry of Employment and Labour and the Construction Confederation employers' organisation signed a partnership agreement aimed at combating illegal working in the Belgian construction sector. The agreement provides for increased monitoring , an awareness-raising campaign, and the establishment of a working group to look into the matter. Trade unions, while in favour of combating illegal working, regretted that they had been excluded from the initiative, because the matters under consideration affect all workers in construction.

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