EurWORK European Observatory of Working Life

Attractive workplace for all

These 102 cases, dating from 2006-2007, are examples of 'win-win situations', showing that it is possible to combine quality of work and employment with economic performance. They deal with key dimensions of the Lisbon strategy such as employability, increasing the labour market participation of underrepresented groups and people at risk of exclusion, pay, flexibility, and business creation and entrepreneurship. The involvement of the social partners at company and sectoral level is a significant aspect of the development of these policies and their outcomes.

102 items found (page 5 of 11)

Guastalla hospital, Italy: Fostering employability

  • Italy
In February 2000, Guastalla hospital set up an organisational improvement project in association with the trade unions representing the healthcare sector. The project focused on redesigning the work organisation and integration of diverse professional profiles around the same working process, improving cooperation and mutual learning, minimising vertical hierarchy and segmentation, improving the quality of care and service and eliminating lead-times and inefficiency.
  • Category

    Fostering employability

De Gruyter, Germany: Towards a balanced flexibility

  • Germany
In 2004, De Gruyter – a German publishing company – introduced a new, voluntary working-time model in its Berlin office: rather than requiring that working hours be recorded, and checked by line managers, the system is based on trust. Employees within sections collectively organise their working hours to ensure continuity of service. Both management and the company works council feel that the new system permits a better work–life balance, while management link it to greater productivity and reduced absenteeism.
  • Category

    Towards a balanced flexibility

Karlskrona Employer Ring, Sweden: Fostering employability

  • Sweden
The employer ring in Karlskrona is a joint venture between seven companies – mainly in the manufacturing business – covering a total of 6,000 employees. The ring was established in 1992 and is a joint organisation formed in order to support the members on retraining and redeploying employees in their companies who have been made redundant or are in need of work rehabilitation in other workplaces. The ring supports the individuals with job coaching, transfer and training.
  • Category

    Fostering employability

Tesco, UK: Make work pay – make work attractive

  • United Kingdom
Tesco is the UK’s largest private sector employer. It has been running employee share schemes since 1981 and has continued to adapt these as new opportunities have arisen through government legislation. Tesco now has three share schemes in operation and large numbers of employees are benefiting from the company’s performance, as reflected in a steadily increasing share price.
  • Category

    Making work pay

University of Siena, Italy: Towards a balanced flexibility

  • Italy
In February 2005, the University of Siena and the Italian confederate and autonomous trade union organisations representing education workers signed an agreement aimed at regulating and extending the labour and social rights of temporary employees. The agreement, the first of its kind, provides maternity, sickness and occupational accident coverage and lays down fixed deadlines for the payment of annual earnings.
  • Category

    Towards a balanced flexibility

Vodafone Omnitel, Italy: Make work pay – make work attractive

  • Italy
In July 2004, the Vodafone Group introduced a new share scheme, called Allshares. The Vodafone Group distributes shares free of charge to all full-time staff, including the approximately 10,000 employees who work for Vodafone Italia. In this way, Vodafone rewards its entire staff for their contribution to the Company's future and gives everyone, regardless of their role or status within the organisation, a chance to play a part in its success.
  • Category

    Making work pay

Philips, the Netherlands: Integration into the labour market of people at risk of exclusion – early school-leavers

  • Netherlands
Royal Philips Electronics is one of the world’s leading electronics companies. In 1982, the company introduced the ‘Philips Employment Scheme’ which originally was targeted at young and unemployed school-leavers, offering training and work experience for people with limited opportunities in the labour market. At a later stage, the initiative came to include other groups of people such as women returning to work and persons with disabilities. By 2004, over 11,000 people had benefited from the employment scheme.
  • Category

    integrating people at risk of exclusion into the labour market

Newcastle Building Society, UK: Towards a balanced flexibility

  • United Kingdom
Newcastle Building Society is a relatively small financial institution operating in the highly competitive home loans market, where it has to survive among banks and building societies that are many times its size. The company has invested in technical systems that allow it more flexibility in how it deploys its staff. It regards flexible working as a way of boosting productivity while at the same time responding to the demands of its employees.
  • Category

    Towards a balanced flexibility

OKG, Sweden: Fostering employability

  • Sweden
OKG produces electric energy at its nuclear plant in Oscarshamn. The group supports competence development through a competence assurance system and a local agreement. The employees have regular training for five to 10 days a year. On top of this, they receive support for advanced training (days off and course materials and travel expenses for long-distance training). All this is decided between the employee and the line manager.
  • Category

    Fostering employability

CNV Bedrijvenbond, the Netherlands: Business creation and entrepreneurship

  • Netherlands
  • Category

    Business creation and entrepreneurship

Pagine