Representativeness of the European social partner organisations: Local and regional government sector

  • Observatory: EurWORK
  • Topic:
  • Collective bargaining,
  • Social partners,
  • Representativeness,
  • Socialinis dialogas,
  • Darbo santykiai,
  • Date of Publication: 02 Kovas 2015



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This study provides information designed to support sectoral social dialogue in the local and regional government sector. The study is divided into three parts: a summary of the sector’s background, with a special focus on industrial relations; an analysis of the social partner organisations in all the EU Member States, including their membership, role in collective bargaining, social dialogue and public policy, and national and European affiliations; and an analysis of relevant European organisations, particularly their membership composition and capacity to negotiate. The aim of the studies on representativeness by Eurofound’s Network of European correspondents (NEC) is to identify the relevant national social partner organisations in the field of industrial relations in selected sectors and their relationships with EU-level associations of labour and business. The impetus for these studies comes from the European Commission’s desire to recognise the representative social partner organisations to be consulted under the provisions of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU).

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Introduction

Objectives of study

The aim of this representativeness study is to identify the relevant national and supranational social partner organisations – the trade unions and employer associations – in the field of industrial relations in the local and regional government sector, and to show how these actors relate to the sector’s European interest associations of labour and business. The impetus for this study arises from the aim of the European Commission to identify the representative social partner associations to be consulted under the provisions of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU). Hence, this study seeks to provide basic information needed to support sectoral social dialogue. The effectiveness of European social dialogue depends on whether its participants are sufficiently representative in terms of the sector’s relevant national actors across the EU Member States. Only associations which meet this precondition will be admitted to European social dialogue.

To accomplish these aims, the study first identifies the relevant national social partner organisations in the local and regional government sector and subsequently analyses the structure of the sector’s relevant European organisations, particularly their membership composition. This involves clarifying the unit of analysis at both the national and European level of interest representation.

The study includes only organisations whose membership domain is ‘sector-related (Table 1).

Table 1: Determining the ‘sector-relatedness’ of an organisation

Scope

Question in the standardised questionnaire to all correspondents

Possible answers

Notes and explanations

Domain of the organisation within the sector

Does the union’s/employer organisation’s domain embrace potentially all employees in the local and regional government sector?

Yes/No

This question has not been asked directly in the questionnaire, but is considered to be ‘yes’ if all of the following sub-questions are ‘yes’. It is considered to be ‘no’, if at least one of the following sub-questions is answered with ‘no’.

According to its domain, does the union/employer organisation potentially cover all of the activities covered by the local and regional government sector in your country?

Yes/No

This question refers to the economic activities of the NACE codes chosen. In the questionnaire, correspondents have been provided with a detailed list of activities taken into consideration by the study.

Only for unions:
According to its domain, does the union potentially cover all occupations within the local and regional government sector, including both blue-collar workers and white-collar workers, or different legal employment status (such as civil servants, as opposed to private law employees)?

Yes/No

This question refers to the sectoral union’s scope with regard to different occupations and different legal employment status. The minimum requirement to answer this question with ‘yes’ would be the fact that both blue-collar and white-collar workers are potentially covered by the organisation’s domain, as well as civil servants and private law employees, if relevant.

According to its domain, does the union/employer organisation potentially cover, within the local and regional government sector, all kinds of administrations/public bodies and entities (for instance both municipalities and regional administrations)?

Yes/No

This question refers to the types of organisations covered by social partners. Some trade unions/employer associations might limit, for instance, their domain to certain levels of the local and regional government sector (only municipalities, or provinces, or regions)

According to its domain, does the union/employer organisation potentially cover the whole territory of your country?

Yes/No

Organisations may cover the whole national territory or only some areas or regions.

Domain of the organisation outside the sector

According to its domain, does the union/employer organisation potentially cover employees outside the local and regional government sector?

Yes/No

Organisations may cover activities outside the local and regional government sector.

Source: Standardised questionnaire, sent to Eurofound’s Network of European correspondents (NEC).

At both national and European levels, many associations are not considered to be social partner organisations as they do not deal with industrial relations. Thus, there is a need for criteria to define clearly the social partner organisations.

As regards the national-level associations, classification as a sector-related social partner organisation implies fulfilling one of two criteria. The associations must be either:

  • a party to ‘sector-related’ collective bargaining or to forms of consultation on employment regulation through talks and non-binding agreements, if collective bargaining is excluded by legislation (as is sometimes the case in public administration, including the local and regional government sector under review here);
  • or a member of a ‘sector-related’ European association of business or labour that is on the Commission’s list of European social partner organisations consulted under Article 154 of the EC treaty.

While affiliation to a European social partner organisation is sufficient to determine a national association as a social partner, this does not necessarily imply that such an association is involved in industrial relations in its own country. Although this selection criterion may seem odd at first glance, a national association which is a member of a European social partner organisation will become involved in industrial relations matters at EU-level through its membership in the European organisation.

Affiliation to a European social partner organisation and/or involvement in national collective bargaining are of the utmost importance to European social dialogue, since they are the two constituent mechanisms that can systematically connect the national and European levels.

In terms of the selection criteria for the European organisations, this report:

  • includes those sector-related European social partner organisations that are on the Commission’s list of consultation;
  • considers any other European association with sector-related national social partner organisations – as defined above – under its umbrella.

Thus, the aim of identifying the sector-related national and European social partner organisations applies both a ‘top-down’ and ‘bottom-up’ approach.

Definitions

For the purpose of this study, the local and regional government sector is defined in quite broad terms in order to embrace the variety of concrete activities performed in the different Member States by local and regional governments, and to provide an accurate account of the specificities of all national arrangements. Of course, it is easy to identify activities which are part and parcel of the administrative nature of the employers: the local authorities. However, in many countries, besides the administrative and regulatory activities which are typical of political authorities at all levels, local and regional governments can be responsible for providing other services covering areas such as public order and fire-fighting, human health, residential care, social work, education and culture.

In the case of this particular study, the following sectoral scope has been used (using the European industrial activity classification – NACE Rev.2):

Section O: Public administration (administrative tasks)

84.11   General public administration activities (by local and regional governments);

84.12   Regulation (under the responsibility of local and regional governments) of the activities of providing health care, education, cultural services and other social services, excluding social security;

84.13   Regulation of, and contribution to more efficient, operation of businesses (under the responsibility of local and regional governments);

84.24   Public order and safety activities (under the responsibility of local and regional governments);

84.25   Fire service activities (under the responsibility of local and regional governments).

Section Q: Human health and social work activities

87        Residential care activities (under the responsibility of local and regional governments);

88        Social work activities without accommodation (under the responsibility of local and regional governments).

Residential care activities include:

87.10   Residential nursing care activities;

87.20   Residential care activities for mental retardation, mental health and substance abuse;

87.30   Residential care activities for the elderly and disabled;

87.90   Other residential care activities.

Social work activities without accommodation include:

88.10   Social work activities without accommodation for the elderly and disabled;

88.9     Other social work activities without accommodation;

88.91   Child day-care activities;

88.99   Other social work activities without accommodation n.e.c.

In addition, in certain countries, the local and regional government sector is also responsible for education and health, which come under the NACE codes 85 (education) and 86 (human health activities). These sectors have their own social dialogue committees, (the one for education being established in 2010, and the one for hospitals in 2006), but it is important to underline that the local and regional government sector can have, in some Member States, a key role in providing these services. A similar situation applies to NACE code 91 (libraries, archives, museums and other cultural activities), which are often covered by other administrative actors too, notably central government.

Libraries, archives, museums and other cultural activities include:

91.01   Library and archives activities

91.02   Museums activities

91.03   Operation of historical sites and buildings and similar visitor attractions

91.04   Botanical and zoological gardens and nature reserves activities

Of course, while there are different activities covered by the study, there may be one single administration responsible for more than one, or even all, of them. Contrary to what happens usually in representativeness studies, where the NACE sectoral definition becomes the key reference to delimit the scope of the study, in this case the sectoral definition can be regarded as employer-driven, so that the NACE sectors, as defined above, have to be included in the study only when the local or regional governments directly exercise their employer functions. In fact, this representativeness study covers local and regional administrations as the direct employer only, and does not cover the activities that can be performed, for instance, by corporations or companies owned by the local authorities.

The representational domains of the trade union and employer organisations and the scope of the relevant collective agreements are likely to vary from these NACE demarcations. The study therefore includes all trade unions, employer organisations and multi-employer collective agreements which are ‘sector-related’ in terms of any of the following four aspects or patterns:

  • congruence – the representational domain of the organisation or scope of the collective agreement is identical to the national NACE demarcation, as specified above;
  • sectionalism – the representational domain or scope covers only a certain part of the sector, as defined by the aforementioned national NACE demarcation, while no groups of workers outside the sector are covered;
  • overlap – the representational domain or scope covers the entire sector along with parts of one or more other sectors. However, it is important to note that the study does not include general associations which do not deal with sector-specific matters;
  • sectional overlap – the representational domain or scope covers part of the sector plus parts of one or more other sectors.

Figure 1: Sector relatedness of social partner organisations: Domain patterns

Figure 1: Sector relatedness of social partner organisations: Domain patterns

 

Table 2: Pattern and scope of the organisation’s domain

Domain pattern

Domain of organisation within the sector

Domain of organisation outside the sector

 

Does the union’s/employer organisation’s domain embrace potentially all employees in the local and regional government sector?

Does the union/employer organisation also represent members outside the local and regional government sector?

Congruence (C)

Yes

No

Sectionalism (S)

No

No

Overlap (O)

Yes

Yes

Sectional overlap (SO)

No

Yes

Note: The domain pattern results from the answers to the questions on the scope of the domain illustrated in Table 1.

At European level, the European Commission established a Sectoral social dialogue committee for local and regional governments in 2004. The Council of European Municipalities and Regions (CCRE-CEMR) on the employer side, as well as the European Federation of Public Service Unions (EPSU) on the employee side, participate in the sector’s European social dialogue. Thus, affiliation to one of these European organisations is a sufficient criterion for classifying a national association as a social partner organisation for the purpose of this study. However, it should be noted that the main constituent criterion is sector-related membership. This is important, particularly, in the case of EPSU, since it also affiliates trade unions which organise sectors outside the scope of this study. Thus, the study includes only the organisations affiliated to EPSU whose representational domain relates to the local and regional government sector.

Collection of data

The collection of quantitative data, such as those on membership, is essential for investigating the representativeness of the social partner organisations. Unless otherwise stated, this study draws on the country studies provided by Eurofound’s Network of European correspondents (NEC), based on a standard questionnaire, which they complete through contacting the sector-related social partner organisations in their countries. The contact is generally made via telephone interviews in the first place but might, in certain cases, be established via email. In case of non-availability of any representative, the national correspondents are asked to fill out the relevant questionnaire by using secondary sources, such as information given on the social partners’ websites, or derived from previous research studies.

It is often difficult to find precise quantitative data. In such cases, the Eurofound correspondents are requested to give rough estimates rather than leaving a question blank, given the practical and political relevance of this study. However, if there is any doubt over the reliability of an estimate, this will be noted.

In principle, quantitative data may stem from three sources, namely:

  • official statistics and representative survey studies;
  • administrative data, such as membership figures provided by the respective organisations, which are then used for calculating the density rate on the basis of available statistical figures on the potential membership of the organisation;
  • personal estimates made by representatives of the respective organisations.

While the data sources of the economic sectoral figures cited in the report are generally statistics from EUROSTAT or national statistical offices, the figures about membership of the organisations are usually either administrative data or estimates. Furthermore, it should be noted that several country studies also present data on trade unions and business associations that do not meet the above definition of a sector-related social partner organisation, in order to give a complete picture of the sector’s associational ‘landscape’. For the above substantive reasons, as well as for methodological reasons of cross-national comparability, such trade unions and business associations are not considered in this overview report. These organisations can, however, still be found in the national contributions, which are published together with the overview report.

Quality assurance

In order to assure the quality of the information gathered, several verification procedures and feedback loops have been used.

  • First, staff at Eurofound, together with the report’s author, check the consistency of the figures provided, and make sure that the organisations listed match the criteria for inclusion for the purpose of this study.
  • Second, Eurofound sends the national contributions to both their national members of the governing board and the European-level sector-related social partner organisations. The peak-level organisations then ask their affiliates to verify the information. Feedback received from the sector-related organisations is then taken into account, if it is in line with the methodology of the study.
  • Third, the complete study is finally evaluated by the European-level sectoral social partners and Eurofound’s Advisory Committee on Industrial Relations, which consists of representatives from both sides of industry, governments and the European Commission.

Structure of report

The study consists of three main parts, beginning with a brief summary of the sector’s background, with a special focus on industrial relations. The report then analyses the relevant social partner organisations in all EU Member States (except Croatia, which was not a Member State when the study was launched in spring 2013). The third part of the analysis considers the representative associations at European level.

Each section contains a brief introduction explaining the concept of representativeness in greater detail, followed by the study findings. As representativeness is a complex issue, it requires separate consideration at national and European level for two reasons. Firstly, the method applied by national regulations and practices to capture representativeness has to be taken into account. Secondly, the national and European organisations differ in their tasks and scope of activities. The concept of representativeness must therefore be suited to this difference.

Finally, it is important to note the difference between the research and political aspects of this study. While providing data on the representativeness of the organisations under consideration, the report does not reach any definite conclusion on whether the representativeness of the European social partner organisations and their national affiliates is sufficient for admission to the European social dialogue, which remains a matter for political decision.

Sectoral background

This section presents the local and regional government sector, especially as far as employment levels and scope of activities are concerned. It also briefly illustrates the specificities of industrial relations in the sector.

First of all, it is important to underline again that the actual scope of activities covered by the local and regional government sector varies across countries and depends on the political decisions that assign to decentralised governments the responsibility for the provision of a number of services of general interest, beyond the administrative, regulatory and public order tasks that political entities generally assume. This specific study extends the range of activities which can be considered beyond administrative tasks and includes some social services, such as education (NACE 85), human health (NACE 86), residential care (NACE 87), social work (NACE 88) and cultural activities (NACE 91), if they are provided directly by local public administrations and through their employees. It should be noted that such delimitation of the activities to be considered in this representativeness study was agreed with the European social partner organisations which were party to the sectoral social dialogue committee in 2013, before the launch of the study.

This is already quite a broad spectrum of activities, but it should be noted that local authorities in several cases provide other kinds of services too. The main example in this respect would be public utilities and services of general interest, such as electricity production and supply, gas and water supply, sewerage and waste management as well as local public transport. All these activities, which may be supplied in different ways by local and regional governments, including through in-house arrangements, are excluded from this study.

The table below shows that it is common practice for local and regional governments to participate actively and significantly in the provision of social services apart from their administrative tasks. In nine countries, the complete range of ten activities considered here is undertaken by local and regional governments, covering the administrative, public order and safety tasks as well as the provision of basic social services. These countries are Belgium, the Czech Republic, Germany, Denmark, Finland, France, Greece, Italy, and Romania. Seven more countries are involved in nine of these kinds of activities: Austria, Bulgaria, Estonia, Spain, Lithuania, Sweden and Slovenia. This means that, overall, in more than half of the 27 countries considered in this study, local and regional governments have a very important role in service provision at local level.

However, in the Netherlands, local and regional governments seemingly undertakes only very focused administrative tasks, while Maltese administrations also provide cultural services, and Cyprus local government not only covers the majority of administrative and public order and safety tasks but also cultural activities such as libraries, archives, botanical gardens and zoological parks. In general, local governments are less likely to provide health services, with local authorities in ten out of the 27 Member States covered by this study, not part of the health system.

Table 3: Public administration and social services activities undertaken by local and regional government sector, EU27 (2013)
 

PA

84.11

RSS

84.12

RBA

84.13

POS

84.24

FSA

84.25

EDU

85

HEA

86

RCA

87

SWA

88

CULT

91

Total

AT

1

1

1

 

1

1

1

1

1

1

9

BG

1

1

1

1

 

1

1

1

1

1

9

BE

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

10

CY

 

1

1

1

         

1

4

CZ

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

10

DE

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

10

DK

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

10

EE

1

1

1

1

1

1

 

1

1

1

9

EL

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

10

ES

1

1

 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

9

FI

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

10

FR

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

10

HU

1

1

       

1

1

1

1

6

IE

1

1

1

1

1

       

1

6

IT

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

10

LT

1

1

1

 

1

1

1

1

1

1

9

LU

1

1

 

1

1

     

1

1

6

LV

1

1

1

1

1

0

0

1

1

1

8

MT

1

               

1

2

NL

1

                 

1

PL

1

1

 

1

 

1

 

1

1

1

7

PT

1

 

1

1

1

1

1

:

1

1

8

RO

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

10

SE

1

1

1

 

1

1

1

1

1

1

9

SI

1

 

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

9

SK

1

1

 

1

 

1

1

1

1

1

8

UK

1

 

1

 

1

1

 

1

1

1

7

 

26

22

20

20

20

20

17

22

23

26

 

Note: PA: Public administration; RSS: Regulation of social services; RBA: Regulation of business activities; POS: Public order and safety activities; FSA: Fire service activities; EDU: Education; HEA: Human health activities; RCA: Residential care activities; SW: Social work activities without accommodation; CULT: Libraries, archives, museums and other cultural activities

Source: Eurofound’s Network of European correspondents (NEC), 2013

The scope of the involvement of local and regional governments in the provision of administrative and social services does not necessarily correspond to the depth of such involvement. For instance, local authorities may provide health services but possibly only by guaranteeing basic first aid support or public hygiene services. Conversely, they could be involved in fully providing health services to residents through the management and operation of local hospitals. Some indications about the degree of involvement of local and regional governments can be derived from Table 4, which shows the level and incidence of the sector employment, as well as the number of sectoral administrations. It must be said that this information is quite difficult to obtain, since statistics are commonly available with reference to activity-based sectors (namely the NACE sectors), whereas this study is looking at the nature of the provider. With such difficulties and limitations, information about administrations and employment in the local and regional government sector could be collected for only 19 countries.

Referring to the incidence of employees in the local and regional government sector over the total number of employees in the whole national economy, the variation is broad and goes from a very low level of 0.2% of total employees in Poland to more than 20% in Denmark, Finland, Hungary, Latvia and Sweden. In general, the sectoral share in employees is significant and, only in eight of the 19 cases for which data are available (Poland, Malta, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Italy, Romania, Greece and Portugal), have local and regional governments a less relevant role in national employment, with a share of less than 5%.

Although data are available only for a subset of countries, it may be interesting to note that women are, in many cases, overrepresented in the local and regional government sector, as in other public administration areas (and it should be remembered that many activities with high feminisation, such as education, health, residential care and social work activities, can be part of the local and regional government sector). This is especially true in the Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland and Sweden) and in Slovakia, where the rate of women among employees in the local and regional government sector is around 80%. However, in some cases, as in the Netherlands and Portugal, men are in the majority. Here, this difference is probably linked to the concentration on administrative tasks, and especially to the absence within the sectoral boundaries of all (the Netherlands) or some (Portugal) of the social services considered here.

Table 4: Administrations and employment levels and changes since 2001*, EU27 (2013)
 

Admin. units
(2011)

% change

No. of employees
(2011)

%
Change

%
Male

%
Female

Share of employment
(2011)

AT

2,500

0.0

:

215,794

-14.0

:

:

BG

264

0.0

:

:

:

:

:

BE

1,756

1.8

361,588

361,588

19.2

39.5

60.5

CY

1,052

:

40,142

:

:

:

:

CZ

15,377

:

:

351,600

20.8

:

:

DE

:

:

:

3,704,151

3.0

43.1

56.9

DK

103

-63.7

639,013

644,013

-2.4

22.5

77.5

EE

227

-5.8

:

60,925

-3.1

:

:

EL

338

-69.0

:

82,815

50.7

48.6

51.4

ES

8,136

0.0

2,103,976

2,103,976

:

40.1

59.9

FI

444

-33.4

432,222

432,222

7.4

16.9

83.1

FR

65,000

:

1,700,900

1,921,200

15.4

:

:

HU

15,234

-1.9

:

734,600

-6.8

:

:

IE

114

0.0

28,811

:

:

:

:

IT

8,938

-42.6

596,381

596,381

0.4

47.7

52.3

LT

60

0.0

:

:

:

:

:

LU

116

-1.7

4,711

3,316

:

:

:

LV

461

-34.2

64,468

64,295

1.5

34.1

65.9

MT

73

7.4

:

582

:

:

:

NL

530

:

:

180,656

-8.0

53.4

46.6

PL

2,809

-0.1

245,940

247,090

29.9

:

:

PT

4,569

0.2

:

136,138

:

51.5

48.5

RO

4,971

30.2

159,000

159,000

-38.3

:

:

SE

310

0.3

1,008,827

936,091

:

20.0

80.0

SI

454

35.5

5,503

:

:

:

:

SK

5,560

88.5

170,169

170,169

863.5

19.8

80.2

UK

486

:

:

:

:

:

:

* Depending on data availability, the reference year may be different from 2001–2011. This refers to Austria (2005–2010), Belgium (2008–2011, for administrations), Denmark and Estonia (2002–2011, for administrations), Greece (2010–2011, for administrations), Ireland (2008–2011, for employment). Further details are available in the national reports.
Note: The number of administrative units is usually taken from statistical sources and may differ from the number of potential affiliates of national sectoral employer associations, since these latter often refer to local and regional governments only.

Source: Eurofound’s Network of European correspondents, 2013

Although data are available only for 16 countries, changes in the level of employment in recent years in the local and regional government sector do not point to the same trend across countries. Despite the different patterns which emerge from the analysis, the presence, in many cases, of important changes in the number of local administrations or sectoral employees (or in both) seems to suggest that the local and regional government sector has been at the centre of important reorganisations and reforms in many EU countries in recent years.

Some countries show a decrease in total employees, often coupled with a reduction in the number of administrative units, thereby signalling the presence of a significant reorganisation trend in the sector. A reduction in the number of total employees in the local and regional government sector was reported in six countries: Denmark (-2.4%), Estonia (-3.1%), Hungary (-6.8%), Netherlands (-8.0%), Austria (-14.0%), and Romania (-38.3%). This trend in employment is accompanied by very different changes regarding the number of administrative units. On the one hand, the reduction in the number of employees takes place with a stable number of administrative units (the Netherlands) or a less than proportional decrease (Hungary). In other cases, the reduction in administrative units is higher than the decrease in employees (Estonia) or much higher, as in the case of Denmark where a reform, introduced in 2007, decreased the number of administrative units by almost two-thirds (-63.7%). From this point of view, Romania appears a special case, since the substantial reduction in the number of employees is accompanied by a significant increase in the number of local authorities (+30.2%).

The other national cases for which data are available show sometimes a stability in overall employees (Italy with +0.4%) or a moderate growth (Germany +3.0% and Finland +7.4%) and, even more often, a substantial increase in employment in the 2000s. In France, the number of employees in the local and regional government sector increased by about 15% and in Belgium and Czech Republic by around 20%. The rise was even higher in Poland (+29.9%) and Greece (+50.7%) and was almost nine-fold in Slovakia, where a substantial reorganisation of the relationship between central and local administrations took place in 2002–2003, with the decentralisation of a number of tasks to local authorities and a significant expansion of the local and regional government sector (+88.5% in the number of administrative units). These tendencies may point to remarkable reorganisation taking place in the sector, with increasing devolution of tasks and a transfer of employment from other administration levels, as happened in Slovakia. However, in other cases, the increase seems to have taken place in a stable institutional framework. This seemingly happened in Belgium and Poland, and even in Greece, before the reform of 2010 which entailed a cut of two thirds in the number of local administrations. In any case, such increases mostly occurred in countries with low or moderate employment levels in the local and regional government sector.

Industrial relations characteristics

There are least two features which must be taken into consideration when looking at industrial relations in this sector. One is the exclusion of associational and bargaining rights in certain countries, which can cover the whole sector, or only some of its sections, in terms of activities or occupations; and the other is that, even if collective bargaining exists, it may take place at different levels and usually either at central government level (for instance, covering the whole public sector) or at single administration level.

A first element shown by Table 5 is the exclusion of collective bargaining rights, in at least some sections of the local and regional government sector, in 14 cases. Collective bargaining is a significant source of regulation of terms of employment in 17 countries (including some where it is excluded for civil servants while it is present for employees with private employment status) and it is prevalent at central or sectoral levels (14 cases). Single-employer bargaining is present in three cases: the Czech Republic, Estonia and Latvia. Coverage rates are usually high and often close to 100%. An exception is Latvia, where only around one quarter of all the sectoral employees are covered by collective bargaining. As has been mentioned, this is a case where only single-employer agreements are present, which may help explain the lower coverage rate. In this respect, it should be pointed out that there are no data about collective bargaining coverage in the Czech Republic and Estonia. In two other cases, Malta and the UK, despite the presence of multi-employer bargaining, the coverage rate is around 70%. In Portugal, bargaining rights are severely restricted since legislation allows municipalities to sign binding agreements with unions only on certain issues, such as working time and health and safety, apart from wages. The terms of employment in the local and regional government sector are set unilaterally by the Ministry of Finance, after consultations with the main trade unions, with the participation of other ministries and of the associations of local and regional governments. Currently, the gross coverage rate (that is considering the whole sector, including the areas where the exclusion applies) in Portugal is less than 1%.

It must be noted that, where collective bargaining is excluded, talks and consultations with the trade unions do usually take place with a wide variation in the scope of issues addressed and in the nature of the outcomes of such talks, from informal consultations to written ‘protocols’. These sorts of talks and consultations, for instance, are held in Austria, Belgium, France, Germany and Spain. The limitation of associational rights is very rare and only applies in certain circumstances to the very top officials, as in the case of Romania.

A second important feature illustrated by Table 5 is the involvement of central governments in the definition of employment and working conditions in local and regional governments. In fact, in a number of cases, employment and working conditions for the local and regional government sector are defined through talks and agreements which cover the entire public sector. Central government is the main player in the regulation of terms of employment in local and regional governments in Austria, Cyprus, France, Greece, Ireland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia and Slovenia. In certain cases, the association of local and regional governments is involved in the negotiations, as in Slovakia and Slovenia, or, possibly with only a consultative role, as in Greece. In two cases, Hungary and Latvia, central consultations takes place within the national tripartite consultation bodies: the National Public Service Interest Reconciliation Council (Országos Közszolgálati Érdekegyeztető Tanács, OKÉT) in Hungary, for the overall public sector; and the National Tripartite Cooperation Council (NTSP) in Latvia.

In two cases, representation of local and regional governments as employers is delegated by law to a state agency. This happens in Italy, with Aran, which has an encompassing representative role for the whole public sector, including local and regional government, and in Ireland, where LGMA is a state agency of the Department of Environment, Community and Local Government which represents the local and regional government sector in central negotiations.

Mandatory associational representation (as opposed to legal representation through state agencies as in Italy and Ireland) can be found in Hungary, where BÖSZ represents the 23 local authorities of Budapest; and in Greece, where ENPE and KEDE are the associations of the regional and the municipal authorities respectively. In these two countries, mandatory associations do not have a strong role in negotiations over the employment conditions in the local and regional government sector. Conversely, the mandatory Local Councils’ Association (LCA) in Malta negotiates the sectoral collective agreement.

Table 5: Collective bargaining coverage and unilateral regulation in the local and regional government sector, EU27 (2013)
 

CB coverage

Dominant level

Details

AT

No collective bargaining rights

Unilateral regulation/Consultations

The Federal Chancellery (BKA), as the central government’s ministry responsible for administrative matters, holds informal talks over wages with both unions (GÖD and GdG-KMSfB are forming a bargaining community). The results of these talks are then traditionally ratified by the respective authorities. The provinces and cities/municipalities usually tend to adopt the wage agreements concluded with the BKA. However, provincial governments can set different regulations by law which then apply to provincial and local level public employees

BG

Civil servants are excluded form collective bargaining

Unilateral regulation/Consultations

Local agreements in educational and other activities.

BE

No collective bargaining rights

Unilateral regulation/Consultations

The general social bargaining on wages and labour conditions in the local and provincial government sector in Belgium is centralised by region (Flemish Region, Walloon Region, Brussels Capital Region) and is organised in a tripartite system in Committees for Provincial and Local Governments (Committee C), in which the federal/regional government, the local and the provincial authorities and the concerned employees are represented. The federal/regional government is obliged to consult the parties in Committee C, however, if no agreement is reached, the government can impose its decisions by law. So only protocols are signed, however, they have a kind of ‘normative’ binding role. At local level (in the municipalities or provinces themselves), only very specific details for the municipality or province in question are negotiated

CY

Over 90%

Central general level

In the case of local and regional government, determination of the basic terms and conditions of employment, (mainly pay increases), is the result of a framework agreement entered into by the state and the two most representative trade union organisations in the area of the broader public sector, the Pancyprian Federation of Labour (PEO) and the Cyprus Employees Confederation (SEK). Each agreement constitutes the guiding framework for the renewal of the collective labour agreements in each local administration (for example, Municipality of Nicosia). In this context, collective bargaining to determine the terms and conditions of employment (such as fringe benefits and working conditions) takes place bilaterally between representatives of the unions that are active in the sector of local and regional government, mainly OHO-SEK and SIDIKEK-PEO and representatives of each local administration

CZ

Not available

Single-employer

Only single employer-bargaining. Basic wages are set by national legislation which covers the whole public sector

DE

Almost 90%

Sectoral/Multi-employer for employees and unilateral/consultations for civil servants

Civil servants are not covered by collective bargaining but by consultations with trade unions and then unilateral regulations. Collective bargaining involves the Collective Bargaining Association of the German States (TdL) and the Confederation of Municipal Employers Associations (VKA)

DK

Practically 100%

Sectoral/Multi-employer

Collective bargaining takes place between the associations of local governments (KL) and regions (Danske Regioner) and trade union cartels.

EE

No information

Single-employer (and central agreements for education and cultural activities)

Collective bargaining is carried out by individual administrations. Some employees working in cultural activities and in education are covered by two agreements on minimum wages signed by the central government (the Ministry of Culture and the Ministry of Education and Research respectively)

EL

The role of legislation has been significantly increased by the implementation of the agreements on financial assistance to support economic adjustment programme

Unilateral regulation/Consultations

Economic conditions are set by law. There is still scope for negotiations over ‘institutional matters’. Negotiations are conducted by the Ministry of the Interior and the Hellenic General Accounting Office; ΚΕDΕ and ΕΝPΕ have only a consultative role

ES

Around 100%

Central general level for employees and unilateral/consultations for civil servants

Employees are covered by collective agreements, whereas civil servants are covered by consultation ‘tables’ which do not lead to formal agreement. The employment conditions of civil servants are regulated unilaterally. According to the hierarchical principle, the central level, organised by the government, prevails over lower levels. The articulation of bargaining is both territorial (central, regional, local) and sectoral (general, sectoral)

FI

100%

Central and sectoral

There are five main collective agreements in the local and regional government sector. On the employer side, these agreements are signed by KT Local government employers

FR

No formal collective bargaining

Unilateral regulation/Consultations

The consultations take place at central level. On the employer side, the government and representatives of local and regional governments, as well as of the national health services are present. Lower-level implementation agreements can improve the protections introduced at central level.

HU

Collective bargaining is severely limited and regulated

Unilateral regulation/Consultations

Consultations takes place in the National Public Service Interest Reconciliation Council (Országos Közszolgálati Érdekegyeztető Tanács, OKÉT) for the overall public sector. There is also the possibility that consultations lead to collective agreements. Such consultations are held by the Ministry of National Economy

IE

100%

Central

Collective bargaining takes place at central public service level. On the employer side, LGMA represents the local and regional government sector. LGMA is a state agency of the Department of Environment, Community and Local Government

IT

100%

Sectoral

Collective bargaining takes place at central and sectoral level. On the employer side, Aran represents all public employers, including local authorities. Single administrations can conclude supplementary agreements, but available resources have been significantly reduced in recent years and now essentially only ‘efficiency gains’ can be used for this purpose

LT

30%

Single-employer

Only single-administration agreements are present

LU

Civil servants are excluded form collective bargaining. The local and regional government sector workers without a public status are covered by collective agreements

Unilateral regulation/Consultations

Civil servants and public employees are represented within the Chamber of Civil servants and public employees (Chambre des fonctionnaires et employés publics), which has a consultation role. Local and regional government sector workers without a public status are represented in the Chamber of Labour (Chambre des salariés)

LV

Collective bargaining is restricted in many ways. No sectoral agreements; only some cooperation agreements in single administrations, mainly in the education sector

Unilateral regulation/Consultations

Wages are determined by national law and governmental regulations. Such governmental regulations are discussed within the National Tripartite Cooperation Council (NTSP). In the education sector, talks take place at national level between the Ministry of Education and Science and the Latvian Education and Science Employees Trade Union (LIZDA)

MT

72%

Sectoral

The Local Councils Association (LCA) negotiates the sectoral agreement with the UHM union

NL

100%

Sectoral/Multi-employer

There are two distinct sectoral agreements for the local and the regional government sectors, respectively, which are negotiated on the employer side by VNG (municipalities) and IPO (regions)

PL

No collective bargaining in the administrations

Unilateral regulation/Consultations

The Labour Code states that civil servants, as well as employees of local and regional governments, cannot conclude collective agreements. Despite this, there are some forms of collective bargaining in single administrations

PT

Less than 1% gross coverage rate. Collective bargaining is restricted in many cases

Unilateral regulation/Consultations

The Ministry of Finance which negotiates with the trade union organisations. After the conclusion of negotiations, the Ministry of Finance decides unilaterally about the result (with or without concertation with other ministries or ANMP and ANAFRE). Wages and working conditions at local authorities are largely dependent on the decisions at this central level. Decentralised bargaining at administration level is possible on organisational issues, but not on pay matters

RO

No information available; 100% in pre-academic education and in public utilities

Sectoral/Multi-employer

Negotiations are held by the central government

SE

100%

Sectoral

There are five central collective agreements in the Swedish local and regional government sector, all concluded by the Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions (Sveriges Kommuner och Landsting, SALAR) on the employer side, and 10 individual unions on the employee side

SI

100%

Central and sectoral

The Association of Municipalities and Towns of Slovenia and the Association of Slovenian Municipalities are part of the bargaining group of the Slovenian Government for negotiating collective agreements. The Public Sector Collective Agreement is a key document for setting wages in the whole public sector

SK

100%

Central and sectoral

Collective bargaining is at public service level. ZMO and VUC bargain on the employer side for local authorities

UK

68%

Multi-employer, sectoral

Sectoral agreements (which may exclude pay, as in the case of teachers) are negotiated by the Local Government Associations (LGA, WLGA, NILGA, COSLA)

Source: Eurofound’s Network of European correspondents (NEC) 2013

National level of interest representation

In many Member States, statutory regulations explicitly refer to the concept of representativeness when assigning certain rights of interest representation and public governance to trade unions and/or employer organisations. The most important rights addressed by such regulations include:

  • formal recognition as a party to collective bargaining;
  • extension of the scope of a multi-employer collective agreement to employers not affiliated to the signatory employer organisation;
  • participation in public policy and tripartite bodies of social dialogue.

Under these circumstances, representativeness is normally measured by the membership strength of the organisations. For instance, statutory extension provisions often allow for extension of collective agreements to unaffiliated employers only when the signatory trade unions and employer associations represent 50% or more of the employees within the agreement’s domain.

The representativeness of the national social partner organisations is of interest to this study in terms of the capacity of their European umbrella organisations to participate in European social dialogue. Hence, the role of the national actors in collective bargaining and public policy-making constitutes another important component of representativeness. The effectiveness of the European social dialogue tends to increase with the growing ability of the national affiliates of the European organisations to regulate employment terms and to influence national public policies affecting the sector.

A cross-national comparative analysis shows a generally positive correlation between the bargaining role of the social partners and their involvement in public policy (Traxler, 2004). Social partner organisations that are engaged in multi-employer bargaining, participate in state policies to a significantly greater extent than their counterparts in countries with no multi-employer bargaining. This can be attributed to the fact that only multi-employer agreements matter in macroeconomic terms, setting an incentive for the governments to seek persistently the cooperation of the social partner organisations. If single-employer bargaining prevails in a country, none of the collective agreements will have a noticeable effect on the economy due to their limited scope. As a result, the basis for generalised tripartite policy concertation will be absent.

In short, representativeness is a multi-dimensional concept that embraces three basic elements:

  • the membership domain of the social partner organisations;
  • their strength in terms of membership;
  • their recognised role in collective bargaining, as in public policymaking.

Of course, the sectoral specificities, as regards industrial relations illustrated above, must also be taken into consideration.

The present study covers 163 trade unions and 57 employer organisations.

The pluralism of employee representation is, in certain countries, particularly high (see Figure 2), as, for example, in Denmark (16 unions), Spain (16 unions), Sweden and UK (11 unions). This can be linked to various specific features of the local and regional government sector. First, as already underlined above, this sector in fact contains quite different activities. Besides strict public administration activities and services, the local government sector is, in many cases, responsible for providing local health and care services, social services, education and cultural services. The strong presence of industrial unions in many countries, that is unions which tend to cover specific sectors and activities, encourages the fragmentation of employee representation along these lines. Second, as in other areas of the public sector, the presence of particular professions, which in many circumstances are also highly skilled, promotes the establishment of occupational or professional trade unions, as in the cases of health specialists and teachers. Third, independent and autonomous trade unions are often more common within the public sector, because political actors tend to be more willing to admit trade union representation and can be more sensitive to the requests put forward by even small groups of well-organised workers which occupy key organisational positions. In fact, although political authorities may, in general, be attentive to the issues of consensus and conflict, such groups of workers can have a significant ‘positional power’, which gives them the capacity to threaten the provision of services; thus increasing the incentives to organise collective action to gain particular benefits and also the likelihood that such requests will be accepted. Finally, the administrative autonomy of certain regions can promote the establishment of separate regional representation, as in the case of Spain and the UK.

On the employer side of local and regional administrations, the representation system is much less fragmented. In 13 countries, a single national organisation is present (Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Spain, Finland, France, Ireland, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Latvia, Malta, Poland, Sweden and Slovakia). The highest number of organisations can be found in Hungary (seven), Germany (six) and Belgium (five). Such multiple organisations can be linked to the division of the local government sector into different types of local authorities (Hungary), the territorial articulation combined with the federal structure of the state (Belgium), and the combination between the territorial articulation and the functional distinction between national associations, national employer organisations and the national section of CEMR (Germany).

Figure 2: Trade unions and employer organisations, EU27 (2013)

Note: EU27 countries. Croatia could not be included as it was not a Member State when the study was launched.

Source: Eurofound’s Network of European correspondents (NEC), 2013

Membership domains and strength

The membership domain of an organisation, as formally established by its constitution or name, distinguishes its potential members from other groups which the organisation does not claim to represent. As already explained, this study considers only organisations whose domain relates to the local and regional government sector. However, there is insufficient room in this report to delineate the domain demarcations of all the organisations. Instead, the report notes how they relate to the sector by classifying them according to the four patterns of ‘sector-relatedness’, as specified earlier. A more detailed description of how an organisation may relate to the sector can be found in Figure 1.

Regarding membership strength, a differentiation exists between strength, in terms of the absolute number of members, and strength in relative terms. Research usually refers to relative membership strength as the density – in other words, the ratio of actual to potential members. However, it must be underlined that this study mainly focuses on membership levels, given the variation of the sectoral demarcation across countries and the difficulties in establishing the overall figures of sectoral employment.

A difference between trade unions and employer organisations in relation to measuring membership strength must be taken into account. Trade union membership simply means the number of unionised people. However the concept of ‘member’ should be specified. Whereas, in most countries, recorded membership includes both employees in jobs and members who are not in active employment (such as unemployed people and retired workers) some countries provide information on a union’s employed membership only. Hence, two measures of trade union membership (and density) have to be defined: gross union membership (including inactive members) and net union membership (referring to employed union members only).

Measuring the membership strength of employer organisations is more complex since they organise collective entities, namely organisations (administrations in the present studies and companies in most of the other ones) with employees. In this case, therefore, two possible measures of membership strength may be used – one referring to the number of organisations themselves, and the other to the number of employees working in the members’ organisations.

For a sector study such as this, measures of membership strength, of both trade unions and employer organisations, have also to consider how the membership domains relate to the sector. If a domain is not congruent with the sector demarcation, membership in the sector under investigation differs from the overall membership. This report first presents the data on the domains and membership strength of the trade unions and then considers those of the employer organisations.

To summarise, this report basically distinguishes between two types of organisational membership (domain and sectoral membership), as defined in Table 6, which are – depending on data availability – also broken down into net and gross membership.

Table 6: Definition of organisational membership figures

Type of membership

Definition

Breakdown

Domain membership

Number of employees (or companies) organised by the organisation in the overall organisation’s membership domain

Net and gross; employees and inactive (for trade unions); companies and employees (for employer organisations)

Sectoral membership

Number of employees (or companies) organised by the organisation in the local and regional government sector

Net and gross; employees and inactive (for trade unions); companies and employees (for employer organisations)

Trade unions

Tables 7 and 8 show some details of the national trade unions which are active in the local and regional government sector and of the sectoral industrial relations system. Probably the main feature to emerge from the analysis of the tables is the strength of the industrial relations system, as indicated by the degree and extent of the involvement of trade unions in collective bargaining or in consultations over employment regulation (that is, talks and non-binding ‘protocols’ when legislation excludes proper collective bargaining and assigns to political authorities the right to unilaterally regulate employment conditions, notably wage levels and other economic benefits), and consult about sector-specific issues and policies.

Despite the already mentioned union pluralism, almost all trade union organisations in each country participate in industrial relations processes, according to the specific national arrangements. Overall, almost 80% of the sectoral trade unions participate in collective bargaining and more than 20% in consultations over employment regulation, while some 95% are party to national social dialogue over sectoral issues and policies.

Table 7: National trade unions in local and regional government – role in employment regulation
 

No. of
trade unions

Role in employment regulation

Union members
(2013)

Employees
(2011)

CB

CONS

SD

AT

2

0

2

2

149,030

215,794

BE

5

0

5

5

80,000

:

BG

9

9

0

9

73,942

361,588

CY

2

2

0

2

200

:

CZ

3

3

0

2

52,408

351,600

DE

7

7

4

6

1,109,000

3,704,151

DK

16

16

0

16

575,768

644,013

EE

3

3

0

3

:

60,925

EL

4

3

0

4

96,000

82,815

ES

16

10

9

16

162,688

2,103,976

FI

6

6

0

6

402,000

432,222

FR

7

0

7

7

50,440

1,921,200

HU

7

1

0

7

28,987

734,600

IE

5

5

0

5

9,000

:

IT

6

6

0

5

179,379

596,381

LT

1

1

0

1

1,100

:

LU

4

2

3

4

:

3,316

LV

7

7

0

7

815

64,295

MT

2

1

0

2

7,342

582

NL

3

3

0

3

60,487

180,656

PL

4

3

0

1

37,000

247,090

PT

5

0

5

4

57,701

136,138

RO

4

4

0

4

70,900

159,000

SE

11

11

0

9

755,121

936,091

SI

7

7

0

7

425

:

SK

6

5

0

5

29,333

170,169

UK

11

11

0

11

1,180,708

:

 

163

126

35

153

5,169,774

13,106,602

%

 

77.3

21.5

93.9

 

 

Notes: CB: Collective bargaining; CONS: consultations over employment regulation (that is talks and negotiations over employment regulation with no binding agreements); SD: Social dialogue and consultations over sectoral policies. : = data not available.

Source: Eurofound’s Network of European correspondents (NEC), 2013

Table 8: National trade unions in local and regional government – representational domain
 

No. of trade unions

Representational domain

No. of union members
(2013)

No. of employees
(2011)

C

S

SO

O

AT

2

0

0

2

0

149,030

215,794

BE

5

1

1

2

1

80,000

:

BG

9

0

1

6

2

73,942

361,588

CY

2

0

0

0

2

200

:

CZ

3

0

0

3

0

52,408

351,600

DE

7

0

0

5

2

1,109,000

3,704,151

DK

16

1

5

9

1

575,768

644,013

EE

3

0

0

2

1

:

60,925

EL

4

0

3

1

0

96,000

82,815

ES

16

0

1

15

0

162,688

2,103,976

FI

6

0

1

4

1

402,000

432,222

FR

7

4

0

0

3

50,440

1,921,200

HU

7

1

3

3

0

28,987

734,600

IE

5

0

0

5

0

9,000

:

IT

6

0

3

1

2

179,379

596,381

LT

1

0

0

0

1

1,100

:

LU

4

0

2

0

2

:

3,316

LV

7

1

0

5

1

815

64,295

MT

2

0

0

0

2

7,342

582

NL

3

0

0

1

2

60,487

180,656

PL

4

0

0

4

0

37,000

247,090

PT

5

0

2

3

0

57,701

136,138

RO

4

2

0

0

2

70,900

159,000

SE

11

0

0

11

0

755,121

936,091

SI

7

1

2

4

0

425

:

SK

6

0

0

4

2

29,333

170,169

UK

11

0

2

7

2

1,180,708

:

 

163

11

26

97

29

5,169,774

13,106,602

%

 

6.7

16.0

59.5

17.8

 

 

Notes: C: Congruence; S: Sectionalism; SO: Sectional overlap; O: Overlap

Source: Eurofound’s Network of European correspondents (NEC), 2013

Figure 3: Trade unions in the local and regional government sector and their domain patterns (N=163)

Figure 3: Trade unions in the local and regional government sector and their domain patterns (N=163)

Source: Eurofound’s Network of European correspondents (NEC), 2013

Turning to the representational domain of individual national organisations, it can be seen that the most common type is sectional overlap (97 cases, or 60%). Sectional and overlapping domains are almost equally widespread, with almost 20% of cases each. Trade unions covering exclusively the whole local and regional government sector are rare (11 cases or 7%).

These representation patterns are significantly linked to the above-mentioned sectoral features: the presence of various activities and different occupations favours sectional representational domains, which focus on specific activities and groups of workers. Similarly, broad and important sectors as education, health care, and culture make the presence of trade unions, which extend their domains beyond the local and regional government sector, quite common; involving both the central government and the private sectors. Finally, the presence of encompassing public sector trade unions can explain the few cases of complete overlap.

Employer organisations

Table 9 illustrates an interesting feature of the local and regional government sector; the low number of associations representing local and regional administrations with an active role in collective bargaining. The point is that the associations of local and regional governments do not often perform the role of employer organisations, since they are not party to collective bargaining. In fact, collective bargaining is, in many cases, performed either directly by central ministries or by individual administrations, or sometimes by specialised agencies established by law, as indicated above. For this reason, only 17 associations out of 57 (30%) are involved in collective bargaining. An even smaller number of five associations (9%) participates in talks over the regulation of civil servants, whose employment conditions are set by administrative or legislative acts. Nevertheless, a large majority of these associations have a recognised role in social dialogue and consultations on sectoral issues and policies (50 associations or 88%)

Table 9: National employer organisations in local and regional government – role in regulation and representational domain EU27 (2013)
 

No. of
EOs

Role in employment regulation

Representational domain

CB

CONS

SD

C

S

SO

O.

AT

2

0

0

0

0

2

0

0

BE

5

0

5

5

0

5

0

0

BG

2

2

0

2

0

1

1

0

CY

1

0

0

1

0

1

0

0

CZ

1

0

0

1

0

1

0

0

DE

6

2

0

4

1

2

3

0

DK

2

2

0

2

0

2

0

0

EE

2

0

0

2

2

0

0

0

EL

2

0

0

2

0

2

0

0

ES

1

0

0

1

0

1

0

0

FI

1

1

0

1

1

0

0

0

FR

1

0

0

1

1

0

0

0

HU

7

0

0

5

2

5

0

0

IE

1

1

0

1

1

0

0

0

IT

2

1

0

1

1

0

1

0

LT

1

0

0

1

1

0

0

0

LU

1

0

0

1

0

1

0

0

LV

1

0

0

1

1

0

0

0

MT

1

1

0

1

1

0

0

0

NL

2

2

0

2

0

2

0

0

PL

1

0

0

1

0

1

0

0

PT

2

0

0

2

0

2

0

0

RO

4

0

0

4

0

4

0

0

SE

1

1

0

1

1

0

0

0

SI

3

1

0

3

2

1

0

0

SK

1

1

0

1

0

1

0

0

UK

3

2

0

3

2

1

0

0

Total

57

17

5

50

17

35

5

0

%

 

29.8

8.8

87.7

29.8

61.4

8.8

0.0

Notes: EO: Employer organisation; CB: Collective bargaining; CONS: consultations over employment regulation (that is talks and negotiations over employment regulation with no binding agreements); SD: Social dialogue and consultations; C: Congruence; S: Sectionalism; SO: Sectional overlap; O: Overlap

Source: Eurofound’s Network of European correspondents (NEC), 2013

Table 10: National employer organisations in local and regional government, – members and employees covered, EU27 (2013)

 

Member administrations

Total administrations

Covered employees

Employees 2011

AT

249

2,500

:

215,794

BE

1,756

264

388,588

:

BG

1,140

1,756

21,200

361,588

CY

39

1,052

3,200

:

CZ

2,496

15,377

:

351,600

DE

16,315

:

1,890,000

3,704,151

DK

103

103

644,013

644,013

EE

177

227

:

60,925

EL

338

338

:

82,815

ES

7,333

8,136

:

2,103,976

FI

444

444

433,000

432,222

FR

:

65,000

:

1,921,200

HU

3,713

15,234

110,000

734,600

IE

:

114

28,811

:

IT

8,522

8,938

502,453

596,381

LT

60

60

14,000

:

LU

:

116

:

3,316

LV

:

461

:

64,295

MT

73

73

582

582

NL

520

530

181,000

180,656

PL

303

2,809

:

247,090

PT

2,650

4,569

:

136,138

RO

3,229

4,971

:

159,000

SE

310

310

1,100,000

936,091

SI

325

454

1,387

:

SK

2,668

5,560

130,000

170,169

UK

454

486

2,235,600

:

Total

53,217

139,882

7,683,834

13,106,602

Source: Eurofound’s Network of European correspondents (NEC), 2013

In terms of representational domains, contrary to the trade unions, the large majority of these associations (90%) do not extend beyond the boundaries of the local and regional government sector. Sectional domains are prevalent and involve 35 associations (61%), followed by congruent domains, which characterise 17 organisations (30%). A minority have a sectional overlapping domain (5 cases or 9%) and none covers the whole local and regional government sector and extends beyond its limits. In fact, even Aran, which has a general representation role for the public sector in Italy, does not cover ‘special status’ local authorities.

Figure 4: Employer associations in the local and regional government sector and their domain patterns (N=56)

Employer associations in the local and regional government sector and their domain patterns

Source: Eurofound’s Network of European correspondents (NEC), 2013

European level of interest representation

At European level, eligibility for consultation and participation in social dialogue is linked to three criteria, as defined by the European Commission. Accordingly, a social partner organisation must have the following attributes:

  • be cross-industry or relate to specific sectors or categories, and be organised at European level;
  • consist of organisations which are themselves an integral and recognised part of Member States’ social partner structures, and which have the capacity to negotiate agreements, as well as being representative of all Member States, as far as possible;
  • have adequate structures to ensure their effective participation in the consultation process.

Regarding social dialogue, the integral feature is the ability of such organisations to negotiate on behalf of their members and to conclude binding agreements. Accordingly, this section on European associations of the local and regional sector analyses these organisations’ membership domain, the composition of their membership and their ability to negotiate.

As outlined in greater detail below, one sector-related European association on the employee side – namely EPSU – and one on the employer side – namely CEMR – are particularly significant in the local and regional government sector; both of them are listed by the European Commission as social partner organisations consulted under Article 154 of the TFEU. Hence, the following analysis concentrates on these two organisations, while providing supplementary information on other organisations which are linked to the sector’s national industrial relations actors.

Trade unions

As far as trade unions are concerned, data on membership could be collected for 93 national organisations (57%). Together, these unions have some 5.2 million members. This figure does not include membership of unions for which it was not possible to identify sectoral members within a broader membership basis. This happened, for instance, for the two Spanish unions CSI-CSIF (affiliated to CESI) and FSC CCOO (affiliated to EPSU). It should be mentioned that EPSU and CESI share two members in Austria and one member in the Netherlands. In these cases, membership was counted separately for the different European organisations and therefore membership of the shared national affiliates was added to all the European organisations involved. In Table 11 the data on the total members (5.2 million = 100%) do not include the duplications; nevertheless when considering the membership of each individual organisation and summing up the respective percentage, then the overall sum exceeds 100%. Similarly in Denmark, membership of trade unions belonging to cartels was counted only once (see the note to Table B2 in the Annex for more details).

Table 11 and 12 show that EPSU affiliates 79 trade unions in 26 countries (that is around half of all the sector-related trade unions), which organise at least 3.7 million workers (or 73% of all trade union members covered by this study, data for 55 unions). A significant number of national organisations are affiliated to other European trade unions: this situation involves 58 national organisations or 36% of all national sectoral trade unions. A scrutiny of these other European organisations shows the presence of many different unions.

A number of national trade unions are affiliated to different ETUC’s European federations. When considering the sector, education is particularly important as the largest share, although a minority of these national organisations are affiliated to the European Trade Union Committee for Education (ETUCE, 27 cases, sometimes with other EU organisations including EPSU), which is a member of ETUC like EPSU. Other ETUC-affiliated European federations include EFFAT, IndustriAll, ETF, and Uni Europa; each of them usually have two to three national member organisations in the local and regional government sector. ETUC itself was reported to have some affiliates among the national trade unions active in the local and regional government sector. These cases refer to indirect membership of sector-related unions through national confederations, or to the very few cases of confederations or general unions included in the study (AC and FTF in Denmark and GWU in Malta).

In addition, European confederations and federations, which are not affiliated to ETUC, have member organisations among the sector-related national trade unions, something which reflects the previously mentioned presence of independent unions at national level in the local and regional government sector. This situation involves at least 49 unions and some 20% of all the union members surveyed by this study. In particular, CESI has members in 11 of the 27 EU Member States covered by this study (including the members of EUROFEDOP, affiliated to CESI). CESI’s membership amounts to at least 850,000 workers (or 17% of the total union members reported for this study, data for 11 trade unions).

National unions with no EU-affiliation are present in 15 countries; they include 27 organisations and cover 3% of the total union membership reported for this study (data for 14 trade unions).

Table 11: European trade unions organisations with sector-related affiliates in local and regional government, EU27 (2013)

 

TUs

EPSU

CESI

Other

N.A.

None

AT*

2

2

2

0

0

0

BE

5

5

0

0

0

0

BG

9

4

0

2

0

3

CY

2

1

0

0

1

0

CZ

3

2

0

1

0

0

DE

7

2

2

3

0

0

DK

16

11

0

4

0

1

EE

3

1

0

2

0

0

EL

4

3

0

0

0

1

ES

16

7

3

3

0

3

FI

6

5

0

0

0

1

FR

7

3

3

0

0

1

HU

7

2

2

1

0

2

IE

5

2

0

0

0

3

IT

6

2

1

0

0

3

LT

1

1

0

0

0

0

LU

4

1

2

0

0

1

LV

7

1

3

2

0

1

MT

2

1

1

0

0

0

NL*

3

2

1

0

0

1

PL

4

2

0

2

0

0

PT

5

3

0

0

0

2

RO

4

4

0

0

0

0

SE

11

4

0

6

1

0

SI

7

0

0

5

0

2

SK

6

3

2

1

0

0

UK

11

5

0

4

0

2

Total

163

79

22

36

2

27

No. of countries

 

26

11

14

2

15

Notes: *EPSU and CESI share two members in Austria and one member in the Netherlands. N.A.: No affiliation.

Source: Eurofound’s Network of European correspondents (NEC), 2013

An interesting point, which can be drawn from the data in Table 11, is that the national organisations which have no affiliation at European level tend to represent sectional groups in almost 40% of cases, contrary to the general tendency depicted in Figure 2, where three quarters of the 163 sectoral unions appear to have a representational domain which extends beyond the local and regional government sector, and only 16% have a sectional domain. Actually, such broader representational domains characterise national unions affiliated to any European-level organisation (EPSU and CESI), whereas narrower domains are typical of national unions with no European affiliation. The combination of a limited representational domain and the lack of affiliation to European organisations suggest that these organisations are more focused on the interests of a specific and limited group of workers in the local and regional government sector within each Member State.

Table 12: European trade unions with sector-related affiliates in local and regional government – role in employment regulation, representational domain and membership, EU27 (2013)

EU affiliation

No. of
TUs

Role in employment regulation

Representational domain

Active

 members

%

N

%
total

CB

CONS

SD

C

S

SO

O

EPSU

79

61

17

77

4

9

46

20

3,701,650

71.6

55

69.6

CESI

22

11

11

21

4

3

8

7

853,036

16.5

11

50.0

Other

36

33

3

32

1

4

31

0

600,785

11.6

16

44.4

None

27

20

6

25

2

10

13

2

173,483

3.4

14

51.9

Not available

2

2

0

1

0

0

1

1

0

0.0

0

0.0

Total*

163

126

35

153

11

26

97

29

5,169,774

100.0

93

57.1

Notes: CB: Collective bargaining; CONS: consultations over employment regulation (that is talks and negotiations over employment regulation with no binding agreements); SD: Social dialogue and consultations; C: Congruence; S: Sectionalism; SO: Sectional overlap; O: Overlap

* EPSU and CESI share two members in Austria and one member in the Netherlands. The total figures do not include duplications

Source: Eurofound’s Network of European correspondents (NEC), 2013

Employer organisations

As for the employer side, it was possible to collect data on the membership of 46 national associations and indications about the number of workers employed by the affiliates of national employer organisations in 26 cases. Altogether, these 46 national employer organisations affiliate some 53,200 administrations, whereas the 26 national employer organisations for which we could gather data on the affiliates’ employment cover around 8.1 million workers.

Table 13 and 14 show that CEMR affiliates the largest majority of national sectoral associations (43 organisations or 75% of the total number of associations, including the Irish state agency LGCA) and it covers at least 43,200 administrations (81%), which employ at least 5.3 million workers (65%), considering the data that we could collect for this study. CEMR has affiliates in all of the Member States covered by this study, except Bulgaria. Six national employer associations (11%) are affiliated exclusively to other European organisations, whereas eight are not affiliated to any. The other European organisations are CEEP and its affiliates HOSPEEM and EFEE, with three cases in two countries; CEPLI, with two affiliates in one country; and ESHA with one affiliate in one country. In this respect, it is worth mentioning that affiliation to CEMR is sometimes combined with affiliation to CEEP and/or to one of the latter’s sectoral federations (seven cases), or to the Congress of Local and Regional Authorities of the Council of Europe – which is a political body and not an employer association (eight cases), or to both (two cases).

Table 13: European employer organisations with sector-related affiliates in local and regional government (2013)

 

EOs

CEMR

Other

None

AT

2

2

0

0

BE

5

3

2

0

BG

2

0

1

1

CY

1

1

0

0

CZ

1

1

0

0

DE

6

4

2

0

DK

2

2

0

0

EE

2

2

0

0

EL

2

2

0

0

ES

1

1

0

0

FI

1

1

0

0

FR

1

1

0

0

HU

7

2

0

5

IE

1

1

0

0

IT

2

1

1

0

LT

1

1

0

0

LU

1

1

0

0

LV

1

1

0

0

MT

1

1

0

0

NL

2

2

0

0

PL

1

1

0

0

PT

2

2

0

0

RO

4

4

0

0

SE

1

1

0

0

SI

3

1

0

2

SK

1

1

0

0

UK

3

3

0

0

Total

57

43

6

8

No. of countries

 

26

4

3

Source: Eurofound’s Network of European correspondents (NEC), 2013

As noted above, the majority of national employer organisations, and therefore most of the affiliates to the European organisations, are not involved in collective bargaining or in consultations over employment regulation within the local and regional government sector, whereas they are party to social dialogue on sector-related policies. In fact, while 25% of CEMR’s affiliates are involved in collective bargaining and 7% in consultations over the terms of employment in the local and regional government sector, 90% of its affiliates participate in sector-related social dialogue. A similar higher presence of sector-related national employer organisations in social dialogue activities applies to those affiliated to other European organisations or to none. As already underlined, this is the result of the prevailing role of central government (and sometimes of individual administrations) in both collective bargaining and consultations over employment regulation in the local and regional government sector.

Table 14: European employer organisations with sector-related affiliates in local and regional government: Role in employment regulation, representational domain and membership, EU27 (2013)

EU affiliation

EOs

Role in employment regulation

Representational domain

CB

CONS

SD

C

S

SO

O

CEMR

43

11

3

39

16

26

1

0

Other

6

4

2

5

0

2

4

0

None

8

2

0

6

1

7

0

0

Total

57

17

5

50

17

35

5

0

EU affiliation

MA

%

N

% of
total

EMP

%

N

% of total

CEMR

43,244

81.3

36

83.7

5,251,150

64.8

18

41.9

Other

9,644

18.1

5

83.3

2,851,097

35.2

6

100.0

None

329

0.6

5

62.5

1,587

0.0

2

25.0

Total

53,217

100.0

46

80.7

8,103,834

100.0

26

45.6

Notes: CB: Collective bargaining; CONS: consultations over employment regulations (that is talks and negotiations over employment regulation with no binding agreements); SD: Social dialogue and consultations; C: Congruence; S: Sectionalism; SO: Sectional overlap; O: Overlap; MA: administrations that are members of the relevant EU organisations; EMP: employees of the relevant administrations

Source: Eurofound’s Network of European correspondents (NEC), 2013

Capacity to negotiate

Another important criterion of representativeness at European level refers to the organisations’ capacity to negotiate on behalf of their members. The EU-level organisations considered in this study, EPSU and CEMR, have established specific procedures to define the positions to be presented within the European social dialogue framework.

As for EPSU, as indicated in Appendix VII to its 2009 Constitution (‘Procedures and mandates for the social dialogue’), its positions, both in the inter-sectoral and in sectoral social dialogue:

should be based on policies adopted by Congress. Where necessary, policies have to be further developed by the Executive Committee for the intersectoral and the Standing Committees for the sectoral social dialogue.

Sectoral social dialogue can be started on EPSU’s initiative or following a proposal by employers. The whole process is coordinated and overseen by the Standing Committee, which decides whether an issue shall be covered. In the event of negotiations, the Standing Committee nominates a negotiating team for the preparation of a joint position, if necessary. The negotiating team works in close cooperation with the President and Vice-Presidents of the Standing Committee and they decide whether to call for input or a decision by members. In any case, all affiliates in the sector will be informed and consulted on positions taken in the sectoral social dialogue committees. The Standing Committee discusses the final result of a sectoral negotiation and forwards a recommendation, to adopt or reject it, for approval by the Executive Committee. The vote over the final result of negotiations is limited to countries from the EU and EEA. The decision is taken with a two thirds majority of the votes cast in the Executive Committee with a quorum of 50% + 1 of titular members.

The governing body of CEMR, according to its 2006 Statute, is the Policy Committee, which is composed of representatives holding an electoral mandate within local and regional authorities. The Policy Committee appoints the Executive Bureau which is:

responsible for carrying out the decisions of the Policy Committee and for any other matter delegated to it by that Committee. In addition, it shall debate current issues concerning local and regional government and may, in anticipation of a Policy Committee, and in particular due to timetable constraints, adopt policy positions’ (Article IV).

Decisions are taken with the approval of the majority of those taking part in a vote; the vote is valid if the majority of the members are present or represented by proxy.

Conclusions

The data collected for this study show that the European social partners currently involved in sectoral social dialogue affiliate the majority of national organisations which have a role in industrial relations in the local and regional government sector in the 27 Member States considered in this study.

According to the available data, EPSU affiliates around half of all the sector-related trade unions, which organise some 71% of all trade union members covered by this study; CEMR affiliates the largest majority of national sectoral associations (75%) and it covers around 81% of the administrations and 65% of all the employees covered by this study. In the local and regional government sector, EPSU and CEMR have affiliated members in 26 of the 27 Member States included in this overview.

On the employee side, CESI organises some 17% of trade union members covered by this study in 11 of the 27 Member States included in this overview.

According to these results, EPSU and CEMR appear the most important EU-wide representatives of the sector’s employers and employees.

Bibliography

Traxler, F., ‘The metamorphoses of corporatism’, European Journal of Political Research, Vol. 43, No. 4, 2004.

Annex

Table A1: National trade unions in the local and regional government sector, EU27 (2013)

 

Organisation

Full name

Full name (English)

AT

GdG-KMSfB

Gewerkschaft der Gemeindebediensteten, Kunst, Medien, Sport, freie Berufe

Union for Municipal Employees and the small Arts, Media, Sports and Liberal Professions

AT

GÖD

Gewerkschaft Öffentlicher Dienst

Union of Public Employees

BE

ACOD-LRB

Algemene Centrale Openbare Diensten – Lokale en Regionale Besturen

General Central Public Services/Local and Regional Governments

BE

ACV-OD/CSC-SP

Algemeen Christelijk Vakverbond - Openbare Diensten/Centrale des Syndicats Chrétiens – Services publiques

General Christian Trade Union-Public Services

BE

CGSP-IRB/ACOD-BIG

Centrale générale des Services Publics – Interrégionale de Bruxelles/Algemene Centrale Openbare Diensten – Lokale en Regionale Besturen/Brusselse InterGewestelijke

General Central Public Services/Local and Regional Governments – Brussels Interregional

BE

CGSP-Secteur Admi

Centrale générale des Services Publics – Secteur Administration

General Central Public Services – Administration sector

BE

VSOA-LRB/SLFP-ALR

Vrij Syndicaat voor Openbaar Ambt–Lokale en Regionale Besturen/Syndicat Libre de la Fonction Publiques–Aministrations Locales et Régionales

Liberal Union for Public Services–Local and Regional Administrations

BG

BUT

Съюз на българските учители

Bulgarian Union of Teachers

BG

FITUGO

Федерация на независимите синдикати от държавното управление и организации

Federation of Independent Trade Unions of Governmental Organisations

BG

FTU-HS

Федерация на синдикатите в здравеопазването

Federation of Trade Unions in Health Services

BG

MF Podkrepa

Медицинска федерация – Подкрепа

Medical Federation Podkrepa

BG

PK Admin

Синдикат на административните служители - Подкрепа

Union of the Administrative Employees Podkrepa

BG

UE Podkrepa

Синдикат Образование

Union Education Podkrepa

BG

ITTU

Независим учителски синдикат

Independent Teachers’ Trade Union

BG

Independent Trade Union Federation ‘Kultura’-CITUB

Nesavisisma sindikalna federaziya ‘Kultura’-KNSB

Independent Trade Union Federation ‘Kultura’-CITUB

BG

Federation ‘Kultura’

Федерация „Култура’

Federation ‘Culture’

CY

OHO

Ομοσπονδία Σωματείων Ημικρατικών Οργανισμών

Federation of Semi-Governmental Associations

CY

SIDIKEK

Συντεχνία Ημικρατικών Δημοτικών και Κοινοτικών Εργατοϋπαλλήλων Κύπρου

Local Authority Workers’ and Employees’ Trade Union

CZ

ČMOS PŠ

Českomoravský OS pracovníků školství

Czech-Moravian Trade Union of Workers in Education

CZ

OS SOO

Odborový svaz státních orgánů a organizací

Trade Union on State Bodies and Organisations

CZ

OS ZSP ČR

Odborový svaz zdravotnictví a sociální péče ČR

Trade Union of Health Service and Social Care in the Czech Republic

DE

dbb

Deutscher Beamtenbund und Tarifunion

Civil Service Federation and Wage Union

DE

GdP

Gewerkschaft der Polizei

German Police Union

DE

GEW

Gewerkschaft Erziehung und Wissenschaft

German Teachers’ Union

DE

GOED

Gewerkschaft Öffentlicher Dienst und Dienstleistungen

Christian Public Service Workers Union

DE

Marburger Bund

Marburger Bund - Verband der angestellten und beamteten Ärztinnen und Ärzte Deutschlands

Marburger Bund

DE

VER.DI

Vereinte Dienstleistungsgewerkschaft

United Service Union

DE

IG BAU

Industriegewerkschaft Bauen Agrar Umwelt

Trade Union for Building, Forestry, Agriculture and the Environment

DK

3F

Fagligt Fælles Forbund

United Federation of Danish Workers

DK

AC

Akademikerne

The Danish Confederation of Professional Associations

DK

BUPL

BUPL – fagforening for pædagoger

The Danish Federation of Early Childhood Teachers and Youth Educators

DK

Dansk Metal

Dansk Metal

Danish Metalworkers’ Union

DK

Dbio

Danske Bioanalytikere

Danish Association of Biomedical Laboratory Scientists

DK

DJØF

Dansk Jurist- og Økonomforbund

The Association of Danish Lawyers and Economists

DK

DLF

Danmarks Lærerforening

The Danish Union of Teachers

DK

DS

Dansk Socialrådgiverforening

Danish Association of Social Workers

DK

DSR

Dansk Sygeplejeråd

The Danish Nurses’ Organisation

DK

FOA

Fag og Arbejde

Trade and Labour

DK

FTF

FTF

The Confederation of Professionals in Denmark

DK

HK/Kommunal

HK Danmark

Union of Local Government Employees

DK

KTO

KTO

The Association of Local Government Employees’ Organisations

DK

OAO

Offentligt Ansattes Organisationer

Organisations of Public Employees - Denmark

DK

SL

Socialpædagogernes Landsforbund

The National Federation of Social Educators

DK

Sundhedskartellet

Sundhedskartellet

The Health Cartel

EE

EHL

Eesti Haridustöötajate Liit

Estonian Education Personnel Union

EE

EKAL

Eesti Kultuuritöötajate Ametiliit

Estonian Cultural Personalities Professional Union

EE

ROTAL

Riigi- ja Omavalitsusasutuste Töötajate Ametiühingute Liit

The Federation of the Trade Unions of State and Municipal Agencies Employees

EL

OSYAPE

Ομοσπονδία Συλλόγων Υπαλλήλων Αιρετών Περιφερειών Ελλάδας

Federation of Unions of Regions Employees

EL

POE-OTA

Πανελλήνια Ομοσπονδία Εργαζομένων Οργανισμών Τοπικής Αυτοδιοίκησης

Pan-Hellenic Federation of Workers of Local Authorities

EL

POP-OTA

Πανελλήνια Ομοσπονδία Προσωπικού Οργανισμών Τοπικής Αυτοδιοίκησης

Pan-Hellenic Federation of the Personnel of Local Self- Government

EL

ADEDY

Ανώτατη Διοίκηση Ενώσεων Δημοσίων Υπαλλήλων

Confederation of Public Servants

ES

ANPE

Asociación Nacional de Profesionales de la Educación

National Association of Education Professionals

ES

CESM

Confederación Estatal de Sindicatos de Médicos

National Confederation of Doctors’ Trade Unions

ES

CIG Administración

Federación Administración Pública Confederación Intersindical Gallega

Federation of Public Administration of the Galician Interunion Confederation

ES

CIG Saude

Federación Salud Confederación Intersindical Gallega

Federation Health sector of the Galician Interunion Confederation

ES

CIG-ENSINO

Federación Educación Confederación Intersindical Gallega

Federation Education Sector of the Galician Interunion Confederation

ES

CSI-CSIF

Confederación Sindical Independiente de Funcionarios

Independent Trade Union Confederation of Public Servants

ES

ELA-GIZALAN

EUSKAL SINDIKATUA GIZALAN

Federation of Public Services of the Basque Workers’ Solidarity

ES

FE CCOO

Federación de Enseñanza Comisiones Obreras

Federation of Education of the Trade Union Confederation of Workers’ Commissions

ES

FE USO

Federación de Enseñanaza de Unisón Sindical Obrera

Federation of Education of the Workers’ Trade Unionist Confederation

ES

FEP USO

Federación de Empleados Públicos de Unisón Sindical Obrera

Federation of Public Workers of the Workers’ Trade Unionist Confederation

ES

FETE UGT

Federación de Trabajadores de la Enseñanza Unión General de Trabajadores

Federation of Education Workers of the General Workers’ Confederation

ES

FSC CCOO

Federación Servicios a la Ciudadanía Comisiones Obreras

Federation of Citizen Services of the Trade Union Confederation of Workers’ Commissions

ES

FSP UGT

Federación de Servicios Públicos Unión General de Trabajadores

Federation of Public Services of the General Workers’ Confederation

ES

Sanidad CCOO

Federación de Sanidad y Recursos Sanitarios Comisiones Obreras

Federation of Health of the Trade Union Confederation of Workers’ Commissions

ES

SATSE

Sindicato de Enfermería

Nursing Union

ES

STE

Confederación de Sindicatos de Trabajadores y Trabajadoras de la Enseñanza

Confederation of Education Workers’ Unions

FI

JHL

Julkisten ja hyvinvointialojen liitto

Trade Union for Public and Welfare Sectors

FI

JUKO

Julkisalan koulutettujen neuvottelujärjestö

The Public Sector Negotiating Commission of the Confederation of Unions for Academic Professionals in Finland

FI

Jyty

Julkis- ja yksityisalojen toimihenkilöliitto

The Federation of Public and Private Sector Employees

FI

KTN

Tekniikka ja Terveys

The Technology and Health Union

FI

SuPer

Suomen lähi- ja perushoitajaliitto

The Finnish Union of Practical Nurses

FI

Tehy

Terveyden- ja sosiaalihuoltoalan ammattijärjestö

The Union of Health and Social Care Professionals

FR

CFDT- INTERCO

Fédération INTERCO, Confédération Française Démocratique du Travail

INTERCO - French Democratic Federation of Labour

FR

FA-FPT

Fédération Autonome de la Fonction Publique Territoriale

Local government sector Federation of Independent Unions

FR

FNACT-CFTC

Fédération nationale des agents des collectivités territoriales CFTC

French Christian Workers’ Confederation

FR

FPSPSS-FO

Fédération des Personnels des Services Publics et des Services de Santé Force Ouvrière

Public services and Health Federation-FO

FR

FSP-CGT

Fédération des services publics-Confédération Générale du Travail

Public services Federation-General Confederation of Labour

FR

Solidaire

Fédération SUD Collectivités territoriales-Solidaire

Local Government sector Federation of Solidarity Unions

FR

UNSA Territoriaux

Union nationale des syndicats autonomes-Territoriaux

National Federation of Independent Unions-Territories

HU

BDDSZ

Bölcsődei Dolgozók Demokratikus Szakszervezete

Democratic Trade Union of Nursery Workers

HU

KKDSZ

Közgyűjteményi és Közművelődési Dolgozók Szakszervezete

Trade Union of Public Collections and Cultural Workers

HU

KÖVIOSZ

Környezetvédelmi és Vízügyi Országos Szakszervezet

Trade Union of Public Service Employees in Environmental Protection and Water Management

HU

KSZSZ

Közszolgálati Szakszervezeti Szövetség

Public Service Trade Union Federation

HU

MKKSZ

Magyar Köztisztviselők és Közalkalmazottak Szakszervezete

Trade Union of Hungarian Civil Servants and Public Service Employees

HU

MSZ EDDSZ

Magyarországi Munkavállalók, Szociális és Egészségügyi Ágazatban Dolgozók Demokratikus Szakszervezete

Democratic Trade Union of Hungarian Workers, Social and Healthcare Workers

HU

SZTDSZ

Szociális Területen Dolgozók Szakszervezete

Social Workers’ Trade Union

IE

IMPACT

Irish Municipal, Professional and Civil Trade Union

Irish Municipal, Professional and Civil Trade Union

IE

OPATSI

Operative Plasterers and Allied Trades Society of Ireland

Operative Plasterers and Allied Trades Society of Ireland

IE

SIPTU

Services, Industrial, Public and Technical Union

Services, Industrial, Public and Technical Union

IE

TEEU

Technical Engineering and Electrical Union

Technical Engineering and Electrical Union

IE

UCATT

Union of Construction Allied Trades and Technicians

Union of Construction Allied Trades and Technicians

IT

CISL FP

Confederazione Italiana Sindacati Lavoratori - Funzione Pubblica

The Italian Confederation of Workers’ Union - Public Works

IT

CSA RA

Confederazione Sindacale Autonoma Regioni e Autonomie

Autonomous Trade Union Alliance Regions and Local Authorities

IT

Direl

Federazione Nazionale Dirigenti Enti Locali

National Federation of Local Government Managers

IT

DIRER

Federazione Nazionale dei Dirigenti e dei Quadri Direttivi delle Regioni

National Federation of Managers and Managerial Staff of the Regions

IT

FP CGIL

Funzione Pubblica – Confederazione Generale Italiana del Lavoro

Public Function - the General Confederation of Italian Workers

IT

UIL-FPL

Unione Italiana del Lavoro – Federazione Poteri Locali

Italian Union of Work - Federation of Local Authorities

LT

LVTPS

Lietuvos valstybės tarnautojų, biudžetinių ir viešųjų įstaigų darbuotojų profesinė sąjunga

Lithuanian Trade Union of State, Budget and Public Service Employees

LU

CGFP

Confédération Générale de la Fonction Publique

General Confederation of Public Service

LU

FGFC

Fédération générale de la fonction communale

Local Government Civil Service Union

LU

NVGL

Neutrale Verband Gemeng Lëtzebuerg

0

LU

OGB-L SP

Onofhängege Gewerkschaftsbond Lëtzebuerg (OGB-L) Syndicat services publics

Independent Federation of Trade Unions of Luxembourg – Public services Union

LV

LĀADA

Latvijas Ārstniecības un aprūpes darbinieku arodsavienība

Latvian Nursing and Health Care Personnel Trade Union

LV

LAPA

Latvijas Apvienotā policistu arodbiedrība

United Police Trade Union of Latvia

LV

LIZDA

Latvijas Izglītības un zinātnes darbinieku arodbiedrība

Latvian Trade Union of Education and Science Employees

LV

LKDAF

Latvijas Kultūras darbinieku arodbiedrību federācija

Latvian Trade Union Federation for People Engaged in Cultural Activities

LV

LPDA

Latvijas pašvaldību darbinieku arodbiedrība

Trade Union of Local Governments of Latvia

LV

LVIPUFDA

Latvijas Valsts iestāžu, pašvaldību, uzņēmumu un finansu darbinieku arodbiedrība

Latvian Trade Union of Employees of State Institutions, Local Governments, Enterprises and Finance Sector

LV

LVSADA

Latvijas Veselības un sociālās aprūpes darbinieku arodbiedrība

Trade Union of Health and Social Care Employees of Latvia

MT

UHM

Union Haddiema Maghqudin

Union Haddiema Maghqudin, UHM

MT

GWU

GWU-Taqsima Gvern u Entitajiet Pubbliċi

General Worker Union-Government and Public Entities Section

NL

Abvakabo FNV

Abvakabo FNV

Civil Services FNV

NL

CNV Publieke Zaak

Publieke Zaak

CNV Public Services

NL

MHF

Centrale voor Middelbaar en Hoger Personeel/Amtenaren MHF

Organisation for Middle and Higher Staff

PL

Sekretariat Ochrony Zdrowia Solidarność

Sekretariat Ochrony Zdrowia Niezależnego Samorządnego Związku Zawodowego Solidarność

Secretariat of Healthcare of the Independent Self Governing Trade Union Solidarnosc

PL

Sekretariat Służb Publicznych Solidarność

Sekretariat Służb Publicznych Niezależnego Samorządnego Związku Zawodowego Solidarność

Secretariat of Public Services, NSZZ Solidarnosc

PL

SKOiW NSZZ Solidarnosc

Sekcja Krajowa Oświaty i Wychowania NSZZ Solidarnosc

National Section of Education of NSZZ Solidarnosc

PL

ZNP

Związek Nauczycielstwa Polskiego

Polish Teachers Union

PT

SINTAP

Sindicato dos Trabalhadores da Administração Pública e de Entidades com fins públicos

Union of Workers in Public Administration and Entities with public purposes

PT

SNMV

Sindicato Nacional dos Médicos Veterinários

National Union of Veterinaries

PT

STAL

Sindicato dos Trabalhadores da Administração Local

Union of Local Authorities Workers

PT

STE

Sindicato dos Quadros Técnicos do Estado

Union of Qualified State Staff

PT

STML

Sindicato dos Trabalhadores do Município de Lisboa

Union of Workers at the Lisbon Municipality

RO

COLUMNA

Federaţia Salariaţilor din Administraţia Publică Centrală şi Locală Columna

Columna Trade Union Federation of Public Central and Local Administration Employees

RO

FNSA

Federaţia Naţională a Sindicatelor din Administraţia Locală

National Federation of Local Administration Trade Unions

RO

Publisind

Federaţia Sindicală din Administraţia Publică Publisind

Publisind Public Administration Trade Unions Federation

RO

SED LEX Civil Servants

Alianţa Naţională a Sindicatelor Bugetarilor Sed Lex, Alianţa Sed Lex

SED LEX Federation of Civil Servants Trade Unions

SE

Akademikeralliansen

Akademikeralliansen

University Graduates Alliance

SE

Kommunal

Svenska Kommunalarbetareförbundet

Swedish Municipal Workers’ Union

SE

Ledarna

Ledarna

Ledarna

SE

Legitimerade Sjukgymnasters Riksförbund

Legitimerade Sjukgymnasters Riksförbund

Swedish Association of Registered Physiotherapists

SE

LF

Lärarförbundet

Swedish Teachers’ Union

SE

LR

Lärarnas Riksförbund

National Union of Teachers in Sweden

SE

SLF

Sveriges Läkarförbund

Swedish Medical Association

SE

SSR

Akademikerförbundet SSR

Union for Professionals

SE

Teaterförbundet

Teaterförbundet

Swedish Union for Performing Arts and Film

SE

Vårdförbundet

Vårdförbundet

Swedish Association of Health Professionals

SE

Vision

Vision

Vision

SI

Glosa

Glosa – Sindikat kulture in narave Slovenije

Glosa – Trade Union of Culture and Nature of Slovenia

SI

SDOS

Sindikat državnih organov Slovenije

Trade Union of Public Authorities of Slovenia

SI

SGPS

Sindikat poklicnega gasilstva Slovenije

Trade union of professional firefighters of Slovenia

SI

SORS

Sindikat občinskih redarjev Slovenije

Trade Union of the Municipal Wardens of Slovenia

SI

TUHS

Sindikati v zdravstvu Slovenije Pergam

Trade unions in the health sector

SI

SVIZ Slovenije

Sindikat vzgoje, izobraževanja, znanosti in kulture Slovenije

The trade union of education, science and culture of Slovenia

SI

Sindikat VIR

Sindikat delavcev v vzgojni, izobraževalni in raziskovalni dejavnosti Slovenije

Trade Union of Education and Research Workers

SK

OZ DLV

Odborový zväz drevo, lesy, voda

Trade Union Association of Wood, Forestry and Water Management

SK

OZ PSAV

Odborový zväz pracovníkov školstva a vedy

Trade Union Association of Education and Science Workers

SK

SLOVES

Slovenský odborový zväz verejnej správy a kultúry

Slovak Trade Union of Public Administration and Culture

SK

SOZ ZaSS

Slovenský odborový zväz zdravotníctva a sociálnych služieb

Slovak Trade Union Association of Health and Social Service Workers

SK

VSOZ

Všeobecný slobodný odborový zväz

Independent Free Trade Union Association

SK

OZ KOVO

Odborový zväz KOVO

Metal Trade Union Association

UK

ATL

Association of Teachers and Lecturers

Association of Teachers and Lecturers

UK

FBU

Fire Brigades Union

Fire Brigades Union

UK

GMB

GMB

GMB

UK

NASUWT

National Association of Schoolmasters and Women Teachers

National Association of Schoolmasters and Women Teachers

UK

NIPSA

NIPSA

NIPSA

UK

NUT

NUT

NUT

UK

Unison

Unison

Unison

UK

Unite

Unite

Unite

UK

ALACE

Association of Local Authority Chief Executives

Association of Local Authority Chief Executives

UK

EIS

Educational Institute of Scotland

Educational Institute of Scotland

UK

SSTA

Scottish Secondary Teachers’ Association

Scottish Secondary Teachers’ Association

Source: Eurofound’s Network of European correspondents (NEC), 2014

 

Table A2: Employer associations in the local and regional government sector, EU27 (2013)

 

Organisation

Full name

Full name (English)

AT

Staedtebund

Österreichischer Städtebund

Austrian Association of Cities and Towns

AT

Gemeindebund

Österreichischer Gemeindebund

Austrian Association of Municipalities

BE

APW

Association des Provinces wallonnes

Association of Walloon Provinces

BE

AVCB-VSGB

Association de la Ville et des Communes de la region de Bruxelles-Capitale/Vereniging van de Stad en de Gemeenten van het Brussels Hoofdstedelijk Gewest

Association of the City and the Municipalities of the Brussels-Capital Region

BE

UVCW

Union des Villes et Communes de Wallonie

Union of Cities and Municipalities in the Walloon Region

BE

VVP

Vereniging van Vlaamse Provincies

Association of Flemish Provinces

BE

VVSG

Vereniging van Vlaamse Steden en Gemeenten

Association of Flemish Cities and Municipalities

BG

UEESB

Съюз на работодателите в системата на народната просвета в България

Union of the Employers in the Educational System in Bulgaria

CY

UCM-ΕΔΚ

Ένωση Δήμων Κύπρου

Union of Cyprus Municipalities

CZ

SMO ČR

Svaz měst a obcí České republiky

Union of Towns and Municipalities of the Czech Republic

DE

Städtetag

Deutscher Städtetag

German Association of Cities

DE

DSTGB

Deutscher Städte- und Gemeindebund

German Association of Towns and Municipalities

DE

Landkreistag

Deutscher Landkreistag

German County Association

DE

RGRE

Rat der Gemeinden und Regionen Europas / Deutsche Sektion

German Section of the Council of European Municipalities and Regions

DE

TdL

Tarifgemeinschaft deutscher Länder

Employers’ Association of German Länder

DE

VKA

Vereinigung der kommunalen Arbeitgeberverbände

Municipal Employers’ Association

DK

Danske Regioner

Danske Regioner

Danish Regions

DK

KL

KL

Local Government Denmark

EE

ELL

Eesti Linnade Liit

Association of Estonian Cities

EE

EMOL

Eesti Maaomavalitsuste Liit

Association of Municipalities of Estonia

EL

ENPE

0

Union of Greek Regions

EL

KEDE

Κεντρική Ένωση Δήμων Ελλάδας

Central Union of Municipalities of Greece

ES

FEMP

Federación Española de Municipios y Provincias

Spanish Federation of Municipalities and Provinces

FI

KT

KT Kuntatyönantajat

KT Local government employers

FR

AFCCRE

Association française du CCRE

French Association of the Council of European Municipalities and Regions

HU

BÖSZ

Budapesti Önkormányzatok Szövetsége

Association of Local Authorities of Budapest

HU

KÖOÉSZ

Kisvárosi Önkormányzatok Országos Érdekszövetsége

Partnership of Hungarian Local Government Associations

HU

KÖSZ

Községek, Kistelepülések és Kistérségek Országos Szövetsége

National Association of Municipalities, Small cities and Micro-regions

HU

MFSZ

Magyar Faluszövetség

Association of Hungarian Villages

HU

MJVSZ

Megyei Jogú Városok Szövetsége

Constitution of the Association of the Cities with County Rights

HU

MÖSZ

Megyei Önkormányzatok Szövetsége

Association of County Authorities

HU

TÖOSZ

Települesi Önkormányzatok Országos Szövetsége

Hungarian National Association of Local Authorities

IE

LGMA

Local Government Management Agency

Local Government Management Agency

IT

AICCRE

Associazione Italiana per il Consiglio dei Comuni e delle Regioni d’Europa

Italian Association of the Council of European Municipalities and Regions

IT

ARAN

Agenzia per la Rappresentanza Negoziale delle Pubbliche Amministrazioni

Agency for the representation of public administrations in collective bargaining

LT

LSA

Lietuvos savivaldybių asociacija

Association of Local Authorities in Lithuania

LU

SYVICOL

Syndicat des villes et communes du Luxembourg

Association of Luxembourg Cities and Municipalities

LV

LPS

Latvijas Pašvaldību savienība

Latvian Association of Local and Regional Governments

MT

LCA

Assocjazzjoni Tal-Kunsilli Lokali

Local Councils Association

NL

IPO

Inter Provinciaal Overleg

Association of Provinces of the Netherlands

NL

VNG

Vereniging Nederlandse Gemeenten

Association of Dutch Municipalities

PL

ZMP

Związek Miast Polskich

Association of Polish Cities

PT

ANAFRE

Associaçao Nacional de Freguesias

National Association of Parishes

PT

ANMP

Associaçao Nacional de Municipios Portugueses

National Association of Portuguese Municipalities

RO

ACOR

Asociaţia Comunelor din România

Association of Romanian Communes

RO

AMR

Asociaţia Municipiilor din România

Romanian Municipalities Association

RO

AOR

Asociaţia Oraşelor din România

Association of Romanian Towns

RO

UNCJR

Uniunea Naţională a Consiliilor Judeţene din România

National Union of County Councils of Romania

SE

SKL

Sveriges Kommuner och Landsting

Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions

SI

SOS

Skupnost občin Slovenije

Association of Municipalities and Towns of Slovenia

SI

ZMOS

Združenje mestnih občin Slovenije

Association of Slovene Municipalities

SI

ZOS

Združenje občin Slovenije

Association of Municipalities of Slovenia

SK

ZMOS

Združenie miest a obcí Slovenska

Association of Towns and Communities of Slovakia

UK

COSLA

Convention of Scottish Local Authorities

Convention of Scottish Local Authorities

UK

LGA

Local Government Association

Local Government Association

UK

WLGA

Welsh Local Government Association

Welsh Local Government Association

Source: Eurofound’s Network of European correspondents (NEC), 2014

 

Table B1: National trade unions and industrial relations in the local and regional government sector, EU27 (2013)

 

Organisation

Type of membership

Domain

CB

CONS

SD

AT

GdG-KMSfB

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

No

Yes

Yes

AT

GÖD

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

No

Yes

Yes

BE

ACOD-LRB

Voluntary

Sectional

No

Yes

Yes

BE

ACV-OD/CSC-SP

Voluntary

Overlapping

No

Yes

Yes

BE

CGSP-IRB/ACOD-BIG

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

No

Yes

Yes

BE

CGSP-Secteur Admi

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

No

Yes

Yes

BE

VSOA-LRB/SLFP-ALR

Voluntary

Congruent

No

Yes

Yes

BG

BUT

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

BG

FITUGO

Voluntary

Overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

BG

FTU-HS

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

BG

MF Podkrepa

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

BG

PK Admin

Voluntary

Overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

BG

UE Podkrepa

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

BG

ITTU

Voluntary

Sectional

Yes

No

Yes

BG

Independent Trade Union Federation ‘Kultura’-CITUB

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

BG

Federation ‘Kultura’

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

CY

OHO

Voluntary

Overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

CY

SIDIKEK

Voluntary

Overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

CZ

ČMOS PŠ

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

CZ

OS SOO

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

No

CZ

OS ZSP ČR

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

DE

dbb

Voluntary

Overlapping

Yes

Yes

Yes

DE

GdP

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

DE

GEW

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

Yes

No

DE

GOED

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

Yes

Yes

DE

Marburger Bund

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

DE

VER.DI

Voluntary

Overlapping

Yes

Yes

Yes

DE

IG BAU

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

DK

3F

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

DK

AC

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

DK

BUPL

Voluntary

Sectional

Yes

No

Yes

DK

Dansk Metal

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

DK

Dbio

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

DK

DJØF

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

DK

DLF

Voluntary

Sectional

Yes

No

Yes

DK

DS

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

DK

DSR

Voluntary

Sectional

Yes

No

Yes

DK

FOA

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

DK

FTF

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

DK

HK/Kommunal

Voluntary

Sectional

Yes

No

Yes

DK

KTO

Voluntary

Congruent

Yes

No

Yes

DK

OAO

Voluntary

Overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

DK

SL

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

DK

Sundhedskartellet

Voluntary

Sectional

Yes

No

Yes

EE

EHL

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

EE

EKAL

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

EE

ROTAL

Voluntary

Overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

EL

OSYAPE

Voluntary

Sectional

Yes

No

Yes

EL

POE-OTA

Voluntary

Sectional

Yes

No

Yes

EL

POP-OTA

Voluntary

Sectional

Yes

No

Yes

EL

ADEDY

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

No

No

Yes

ES

ANPE

Voluntary

Sectional

No

Yes

Yes

ES

CESM

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

No

Yes

Yes

ES

CIG Administración

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

Yes

Yes

ES

CIG Saude

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

No

Yes

Yes

ES

CIG-ENSINO

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

No

Yes

Yes

ES

CSI-CSIF

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

ES

ELA-GIZALAN

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

ES

FE CCOO

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

ES

FE USO

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

ES

FEP USO

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

Yes

Yes

ES

FETE UGT

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

ES

FSC CCOO

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

ES

FSP UGT

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

Yes

Yes

ES

Sanidad CCOO

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

ES

SATSE

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

No

Yes

Yes

ES

STE

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

No

Yes

Yes

FI

JHL

Voluntary

Overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

FI

JUKO

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

FI

Jyty

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

FI

KTN

Voluntary

Sectional

Yes

No

Yes

FI

SuPer

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

FI

Tehy

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

FR

CFDT- INTERCO

Voluntary

Overlapping

No

Yes

Yes

FR

FA-FPT

Voluntary

Congruent

No

Yes

Yes

FR

FNACT-CFTC

Voluntary

Congruent

No

Yes

Yes

FR

FPSPSS-FO

Voluntary

Overlapping

No

Yes

Yes

FR

FSP-CGT

Voluntary

Congruent

No

Yes

Yes

FR

Solidaire

Voluntary

Congruent

No

Yes

Yes

FR

UNSA Territoriaux

Voluntary

Overlapping

No

Yes

Yes

GR

OSYAPE

Voluntary

Sectional

Yes

No

Yes

GR

POE-OTA

Voluntary

Sectional

Yes

No

Yes

GR

POP-OTA

Voluntary

Sectional

Yes

No

Yes

GR

ADEDY

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

No

No

Yes

HU

BDDSZ

Voluntary

Sectional

No

No

Yes

HU

KKDSZ

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

HU

KÖVIOSZ

Voluntary

Sectional

No

No

Yes

HU

KSZSZ

Voluntary

Congruent

No

No

Yes

HU

MKKSZ

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

No

No

Yes

HU

MSZ EDDSZ

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

No

No

Yes

HU

SZTDSZ

Voluntary

Sectional

No

No

Yes

IE

IMPACT

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

IE

OPATSI

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

IE

SIPTU

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

IE

TEEU

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

IE

UCATT

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

IT

CISL FP

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

IT

CSA RA

Voluntary

Sectional

Yes

No

Yes

IT

Direl

Voluntary

Sectional

Yes

No

Yes

IT

DIRER

Voluntary

Sectional

Yes

No

Yes

IT

FP CGIL

Voluntary

Overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

IT

UIL-FPL

Voluntary

Overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

LT

LVTPS

Voluntary

Overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

LU

CGFP

Voluntary

Overlapping

No

Yes

Yes

LU

FGFC

Voluntary

Sectional

No

Yes

Yes

LU

NVGL

Voluntary

Sectional

Yes

No

Yes

LU

OGB-L SP

Voluntary

Overlapping

Yes

Yes

Yes

LV

LĀADA

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

LV

LAPA

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

LV

LIZDA

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

LV

LKDAF

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

LV

LPDA

Voluntary

Congruent

Yes

No

Yes

LV

LVIPUFDA

Voluntary

Overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

LV

LVSADA

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

MT

UHM

Voluntary

Overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

MT

GWU

Voluntary

Overlapping

No

No

Yes

NL

Abvakabo FNV

Voluntary

Overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

NL

CNV Publieke Zaak

Voluntary

Overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

NL

MHF

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

PL

Sekretariat Ochrony Zdrowia Solidarność

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

No

PL

Sekretariat Służb Publicznych Solidarność

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

No

No

Yes

PL

SKOiW NSZZ Solidarnosc

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

No

PL

ZNP

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

No

PT

SINTAP

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

No

Yes

Yes

PT

SNMV

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

No

Yes

Yes

PT

STAL

Voluntary

Sectional

No

Yes

Yes

PT

STE

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

No

Yes

Yes

PT

STML

Voluntary

Sectional

No

Yes

Yes

RO

COLUMNA

Voluntary

Overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

RO

FNSA

Voluntary

Congruent

Yes

No

Yes

RO

Publisind

Voluntary

Congruent

Yes

No

Yes

RO

SED LEX Civil Servants

Voluntary

Overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

SE

Akademikeralliansen

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

SE

Kommunal

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

SE

Ledarna

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

SE

Legitimerade Sjukgymnasters Riksförbund

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

SE

LF

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

SE

LR

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

SE

SLF

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

SE

SSR

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

SE

Teaterförbundet

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

No

SE

Vårdförbundet

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

SE

Vision

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

SI

Glosa

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

SI

SDOS

Voluntary

Congruent

Yes

No

Yes

SI

SGPS

Voluntary

Sectional

Yes

No

Yes

SI

SORS

Voluntary

Sectional

Yes

No

Yes

SI

TUHS

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

SI

SVIZ Slovenije

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

SI

Sindikat VIR

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

SK

OZ DLV

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

SK

OZ PSAV

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

SK

SLOVES

Voluntary

Overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

SK

SOZ ZaSS

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

SK

VSOZ

Voluntary

Overlapping

Yes

No

No

SK

OZ KOVO

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

No

No

Yes

UK

ATL

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

UK

FBU

Voluntary

Sectional

Yes

No

Yes

UK

GMB

Voluntary

Overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

UK

NASUWT

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

UK

NIPSA

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

UK

NUT

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

UK

Unison

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

UK

Unite

Voluntary

Overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

UK

ALACE

Voluntary

Sectional

Yes

No

Yes

UK

EIS

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

UK

SSTA

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

Notes: CB: Collective bargaining; CONS: consultations over employment regulations (that is talks and negotiations over employment regulation with no binding agreements); SD: Social dialogue and consultations over sectoral policies

Source: Eurofound’s Network of European correspondents (NEC), 2014

 

Table B2: National trade unions and industrial relations in the local and regional government sector: Membership and affiliations, EU27 (2013)

 

Trade union

Total active members

Sectoral active members

Global affiliation

European affiliation

National affiliation

AT

GdG-KMSfB

140,000

50,000

PSI, ITF, IFJ, UNI-MEI, FIM, FIA, FIFPro

EPSU, EUROFEDOP, ETF, EFJ, UNI-EuroMEI

OGB

AT

GÖD

185,581

99,030

PSI

EPSU, EUROFEDOP

OGB

BE

ACOD-LRB

:

:

ITUC

(ETUC), EPSU, ETUCE

FGTB-ABVV

BE

ACV-OD/CSC-SP

165,148

80,000

ITUC

EPSU

ACV

BE

CGSP-IRB/ACOD-BIG

:

:

ITUC, PSI

(ETUC), EPSU, ETUCE

FGTB-ABVV

BE

CGSP-Secteur Admi

:

:

ITUC, PSI

(ETUC), EPSU, ETUCE

FGTB-ABVV

BE

VSOA-LRB/SLFP-ALR

:

:

ITUC

(ETUC), EPSU, ETUCE

ACLVB-CGSLB

BG

BUT

60,500

50,447

Education international

ETUCE

CITUB

BG

FITUGO

9,000

4,050

PSI

EPSU

CITUB

BG

FTU-HS

9,100

6,000

PSI

EPSU

CITUB

BG

MF Podkrepa

4,000

1,038

PSI

EPSU

Confederation of Labour Podkrepa

BG

PK Admin

2,150

226

PSI

EPSU

Confederation of Labour Podkrepa

BG

UE Podkrepa

8,500

5,900

Education international

ETUCE

Confederation of Labour Podkrepa

BG

ITTU

5,481

5,481

None

None

CITUB

BG

Independent Trade Union Federation ‘Kultura’-CITUB

1,300

:

None

None

CITUB

BG

Federation ‘Kultura’

1,105

800

None

None

Confederation of Labour Podkrepa

CY

OHO

9,875

200

:

EPSU

SEK

CY

SIDIKEK

:

:

:

:

PEO

CZ

ČMOS PŠ

26,061

25,595

EI

ETUCE

ČMKOS

CZ

OS SOO

24,000

:

PSI

EPSU

ČMKOS

CZ

OS ZSP ČR

31,770

26,813

PSI

EPSU

ČMKOS

DE

dbb

1,260,000

510,000

:

CESI

None

DE

GdP

173,223

:

None

EuroCOP

DGB

DE

GEW

266,542

:

EI

ETUCE

DGB

DE

GOED

58,754

:

:

CESI

CGB

DE

Marburger Bund

114,000

49,000

None

EPSU

None

DE

VER.DI

2,061,198

550,000

UNI Global, PSI

EPSU

DGB

DE

IG BAU

297,763

:

IFBWW

EFBWW

DGB

DK

3F

323,076*

28,680*

IndustriAll Global, Uni Global Union, IFBWW

EPSU, EFBWW, Uni Europa, EFFAT

LO, OAO, KTO

DK

AC

227,015

37,009

ITUC

ETUC, EUROCADRES

None

DK

BUPL

52,335*

52,335*

EI

ETUCE

FTF, KTO

DK

Dansk Metal

116,005*

4,500*

IndustriAll Global, PSI

EPSU, IndustriAll Europe

LO, OAO, KTO

DK

Dbio

5,332*

5,000*

PSI

EPSU

FTF, Sundhedskartellet, KTO

DK

DJØF

78,110*

8,726*

PSI, UNI Global

EPSU, UNI Europa

AC, KTO

DK

DLF

61,958*

61,958*

EI

NLS, ETUCE

FTF, KTO

DK

DS

14,300*

8,643*

PSI, IFSW

EPSU, EFSW

FTF, OAO, KTO

DK

DSR

53,181*

53,181*

PSI

EPSU

FTF, Sundheds-kartellet

DK

FOA

192,670*

187,954*

PSI

EPSU

LO, OAO, KTO

DK

FTF

435,700

206,357

ITUC

ETUC, TUAC, NFS

None

DK

HK/Kommunal

66,956*

66,956*

UNI Global, PSI

EPSU

LO, OAO, KTO

DK

KTO

455,400*

455,400*

None

None

None

DK

OAO

391,379

332,402

PSI

EPSU

LO, KTO

DK

SL

36,790*

30,408*

PSI, AIEJI (International Association of Social Educators)

EPSU

LO, OAO, KTO

DK

Sundhedskartellet

106,326*

106,326*

None

EPSU

None

EE

EHL

10,538

:

EI

ETUCE

None

EE

EKAL

1,063

:

None

(ETUC)

TALO

EE

ROTAL

2,090

:

PSI

EPSU

EAKL

EL

OSYAPE

:

:

None

(EPSU)

ADEDY

EL

POE-OTA

45,000

45,000

None

(EPSU)

ADEDY

EL

POP-OTA

6,000

6,000

None

None

GSEE

EL

ADEDY

273,000

45,000

PSI

EPSU, ETUCE

None

ES

ANPE

60,000

60,000

None

CESI

None

ES

CESM

45,000

:

None

FEMS

None

ES

CIG Administración

8,000

:

None

None

CIG

ES

CIG Saude

4,000

4,000

None

None

CIG

ES

CIG-ENSINO

8,300

:

None

None

CIG

ES

CSI-CSIF

172,328

:

None

CESI

None

ES

ELA-GIZALAN

30,017

:

PSI, EI

EPSU

None

ES

FE CCOO

:

:

EI

ETUCE, (EPSU)

CCOO

ES

FE USO

12,500

:

EI

ETUCE

USO

ES

FEP USO

:

8,688

None

EPSU

USO

ES

FETE UGT

:

:

EI

ETUCE, (EPSU)

UGT

ES

FSC CCOO

200,000

:

PSI

EPSU

CCOO

ES

FSP UGT

:

:

PSI

EPSU

UGT

ES

Sanidad CCOO

91,000

:

PSI

(EPSU)

CCOO

ES

SATSE

90,000

90,000

None

EUROFEDOP

None

ES

STE

50,000

:

EI

ETUCE

None

FI

JHL

180,000

110,000

PSI, ITF

EPSU, Nordic Public Service Unions (NOFS), Nordic Federation of Unions of Municipal Employees (KNS/KPY), Nordic Union for the Service Sectors (SUN), Nordic Transport Workers’ Federation (NTF), European Transport Workers’ Federation (ETF)

SAK

FI

JUKO

170,000

115,000

None

None

AKAVA

FI

Jyty

55,000

47,000

PSI

EPSU

STTK

FI

KTN

20,000

20,000

PSI

EPSU

STTK

FI

SuPer

69,000

43,000

PSI

EPSU, EPN

STTK

FI

Tehy

89,000

67,000

PSI

EPSU, NTR

STTK

FR

CFDT- INTERCO

287,000

50,440

ITUC, PSI

EPSU

CFDT

FR

FA-FPT

:

:

None

CESI

None

FR

FNACT-CFTC

:

:

ITUC

(ETUC), EUROFEDOP

CFTC

FR

FPSPSS-FO

:

:

ITUC, PSI

EPSU

CGT-FO

FR

FSP-CGT

:

:

ITUC, PSI

EPSU

CGT

FR

Solidaire

:

:

None

EUROFEDOP

SUD

FR

UNSA Territoriaux

:

:

None

None

UNSA

HU

BDDSZ

2,597

2,597

None

(ETUC)

SZEF

HU

KKDSZ

3,000

2,990

None

EPSU

SZEF

HU

KÖVIOSZ

:

:

None

None

SZEF, KSZSZ

HU

KSZSZ

:

:

None

EUROFEDOP

SZEF

HU

MKKSZ

8,800

6,400

None

CESI

SZEF

HU

MSZ EDDSZ

18,000

17,000

PSI

EPSU

SZEF

HU

SZTDSZ

:

:

None

None

MSZOSZ

IE

IMPACT

63,566

9,000

PSI

EPSU

ICTU

IE

OPATSI

615

:

None

None

ICTU

IE

SIPTU

199,881

:

None

EPSU

ICTU

IE

TEEU

39,000

:

None

None

ICTU

IE

UCATT

8,750

:

None

None

ICTU

IT

CISL FP

324,000

57,990

None

EPSU

CISL

IT

CSA RA

13,909

12,470

None

CESI

CGU-CISAL

IT

Direl

646

646

None

None

Confedir

IT

DIRER

431

431

None

None

Confedir

IT

FP CGIL

411,499

74,634

PSI

EPSU

CGIL

IT

UIL-FPL

203,524

33,208

None

None

UIL

LT

LVTPS

3,000

1,100

PSI

EPSU

LPSK

LU

CGFP

:

:

None

CESI

None

LU

FGFC

4,200

:

None

CESI

None

LU

NVGL

600

:

None

None

None

LU

OGB-L SP

:

:

PSI

EPSU

OGB-L

LV

LĀADA

1,024

:

None

CESI

LBAS

LV

LAPA

500

:

None

EuroCOP

LBAS

LV

LIZDA

31,296

:

EI

ETUCE

LBAS

LV

LKDAF

1,912

:

Unimei, EuroFIA, FIA, Unigraphica

CESI

LBAS

LV

LPDA

815

815

None

None

LBAS

LV

LVIPUFDA

3,063

:

None

CESI

LBAS

LV

LVSADA

11,977

:

PSI

EPSU

LBAS

MT

UHM

3,544

186

INFEDOP

EUROFEDOP

CMTU

MT

GWU

37,488

7,156

ITUC, PSI

ETUC, EPSU

None

NL

Abvakabo FNV

355,500

47,860

PSI

EPSU

FNV

NL

CNV Publieke Zaak

77,000

10,150

None

EPSU, CESI, FSESP

CNV

NL

MHF

80,000

2,477

None

None

CMHP

PL

Sekretariat Ochrony Zdrowia Solidarność

45,000

1,000

None

EPSU

NSZZ Solidarnosc

PL

Sekretariat Służb Publicznych Solidarność

32,000

4,000

None

EPSU

NSZZ Solidarnosc

PL

SKOiW NSZZ Solidarnosc

50,000

:

EI

ETUCE

NSZZ Solidarnosc

PL

ZNP

250,000

32,000

EI

ETUCE

OPZZ

PT

SINTAP

:

:

None

EPSU

UGT, FESAP

PT

SNMV

1,692

:

None

None

None

PT

STAL

53,145

53,145

PSI

EPSU

CGTP

PT

STE

:

:

None

EPSU

UGT

PT

STML

4,556

4,556

None

None

CGTP

RO

COLUMNA

9,000

:

PSI

EPSU

CNSLR Frăţia

RO

FNSA

29,600

29,600

None

EPSU

Cartel Alfa

RO

Publisind

20,700

41,300

PSI

EPSU

BNS

RO

SED LEX Civil Servants

100,000

:

PSI

EPSU

None

SE

Akademikeralliansen

:

:

:

:

:

SE

Kommunal

507,000

350,000

ITF, PSI, IUL

(ETUC), EPSU

LO

SE

Ledarna

90,000

13,000

None

CEC

None

SE

Legitimerade Sjukgymnasters Riksförbund

10,500

5,400

WCPT

ECPTS

SACO

SE

LF

230,000

150,000

(ITUC)

(ETUC)

TCO

SE

LR

:

:

EI

NLS, ETUCE

SACO

SE

SLF

33,000

25,000

WMA

CPME, UEMS, (ETUC), NL

SACO

SE

SSR

47,914

26,621

PSI, IFSW, ICSW

EPSU

SACO

SE

Teaterförbundet

8,000

100

UNI-MEI, FIA

FERA

TCO

SE

Vårdförbundet

110,000

85,000

IFIBLS, ICN

EPSU, EFN, EFRS, EPBS

TCO

SE

Vision

135,000

100,000

PSI

EPSU, NOFS, NTR

TCO

SI

Glosa

:

:

FIA, FIM

Euro FIA, Euro FIM

ZSSS

SI

SDOS

:

:

None

(ETUC)

ZSSS

SI

SGPS

400

380

None

(ETUC)

ZSSS

SI

SORS

45

45

None

None

None

SI

TUHS

:

:

(UNI Global)

None

PERGAM

SI

SVIZ Slovenije

39,000

:

EI, FIM

ETUCE

KSJS

SI

Sindikat VIR

39,000

:

None

(ETUC)

ZSSS

SK

OZ DLV

13,246

4,939

PSI

EPSU

KOZ SR

SK

OZ PSAV

53,000

:

EI

ETUCE

KOZ SR

SK

SLOVES

25,000

12,300

None

EUROFEDOP

KOZ SR

SK

SOZ ZaSS

23,051

9,594

PSI

EPSU

KOZ SR

SK

VSOZ

5,400

2,500

None

EUROFEDOP

None

SK

OZ KOVO

63,000

:

PSI

EPSU, EMF

KOZ SR

UK

ATL

208,844

:

None

ETUCE

TUC

UK

FBU

43,000

43,000

PSI, IFUA

EPSU

TUC, STUC, ICTU

UK

GMB

620,000

320,000

PSI

(ETUC), EPSU

TUC

UK

NASUWT

338,688

:

None

ETUCE

TUC

UK

NIPSA

46,000

44,500

None

EPSU

ICTU

UK

NUT

386,668

:

None

ETUCE

TUC

UK

Unison

1,286,000

726,184

PSI

EPSU

TUC

UK

Unite

:

:

UNI Global, BWINT, PSI, IUF, IndustriALL, ITF

UNI Europa, EFBWW, EPSU, EFFAT, IndustriALL, ETF

TUC

UK

ALACE

24

24

None

None

None

UK

EIS

53,600

47,000

EI

ETUCE

STUC, TUC

UK

SSTA

:

:

EI

ETUCE

STUC

* In Denmark, the presence of many union cartels in the local and regional government sector makes the situation quite complex. Membership data with an asterisk were not added to the overall total to avoid duplications. Membership declared by union confederations with members in the local and regional government sector were used. Please refer to national affiliation to identify links between the various organisations. More details available in the national report.
Note: Indirect membership is indicated between brackets

Source: Eurofound’s Network of European correspondents (NEC), 2014

 

Table C1: National employer associations and industrial relations in the local and regional government sector, EU27 (2013)

 

Organisation

Type

Domain

CB

CONS

SD

AT

Staedtebund

Voluntary

Sectional

No

No

No

AT

Gemeindebund

Voluntary

Sectional

No

No

No

BE

APW

Voluntary

Sectional

No

Yes

Yes

BE

AVCB-VSGB

Voluntary

Sectional

No

Yes

Yes

BE

UVCW

Voluntary

Sectional

No

Yes

Yes

BE

VVP

Voluntary

Sectional

No

Yes

Yes

BE

VVSG

Voluntary

Sectional

No

Yes

Yes

BG

UEESB

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

BG

ADEB

Voluntary

Sectional

Yes

No

Yes

CY

UCM-ΕΔΚ

Voluntary

Sectional

No

No

Yes

CZ

SMO ČR

Voluntary

Sectional

No

No

Yes

DE

Städtetag

Voluntary

Sectional

No

No

Yes

DE

DSTGB

Voluntary

Sectional

No

No

Yes

DE

Landkreistag

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

No

No

Yes

DE

RGRE

Voluntary

Congruent

No

No

No

DE

TdL

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

No

DE

VKA

Voluntary

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

DK

Danske Regioner

Voluntary

Sectional

Yes

No

Yes

DK

KL

Voluntary

Sectional

Yes

No

Yes

EE

ELL

Voluntary

Congruent

No

No

Yes

EE

EMOL

Voluntary

Congruent

No

No

Yes

EL

ENPE

Mandatory

Sectional

No

No

Yes

EL

KEDE

Mandatory

Sectional

No

No

Yes

ES

FEMP

Voluntary

Sectional

No

No

Yes

FI

KT

Compulsory

Congruent

Yes

No

Yes

FR

AFCCRE

Voluntary

Congruent

No

No

Yes

GR

ENPE

Mandatory

Sectional

No

No

Yes

GR

KEDE

Mandatory

Sectional

No

No

Yes

HU

BÖSZ

Mandatory

Sectional

No

No

Yes

HU

KÖOÉSZ

Voluntary

Congruent

No

No

Yes

HU

KÖSZ

Voluntary

Sectional

No

No

Yes

HU

MFSZ

Voluntary

Sectional

No

No

Yes

HU

MJVSZ

Voluntary

Sectional

No

No

No

HU

MÖSZ

Voluntary

Sectional

No

No

No

HU

TÖOSZ

Voluntary

Congruent

No

No

Yes

IE

LGMA

Mandatory

Congruent

Yes

No

Yes

IT

AICCRE

Voluntary

Congruent

No

No

No

IT

ARAN

Mandatory

Sectional overlapping

Yes

No

Yes

LT

LSA

Voluntary

Congruent

No

No

Yes

LU

SYVICOL

Voluntary

Sectional

No

No

Yes

LV

LPS

Voluntary

Congruent

No

No

Yes

MT

LCA

Mandatory

Congruent

Yes

No

Yes

NL

IPO

Voluntary

Sectional

Yes

No

Yes

NL

VNG

Voluntary

Sectional

Yes

No

Yes

PL

ZMP

Voluntary

Sectional

No

No

Yes

PT

ANAFRE

Voluntary

Sectional

No

No

Yes

PT

ANMP

Voluntary

Sectional

No

No

Yes

RO

ACOR

Voluntary

Sectional

No

No

Yes

RO

AMR

Voluntary

Sectional

No

No

Yes

RO

AOR

Voluntary

Sectional

No

No

Yes

RO

UNCJR

Voluntary

Sectional

No

No

Yes

SE

SKL

Voluntary

Congruent

Yes

No

Yes

SI

SOS

Voluntary

Congruent

No

No

Yes

SI

ZMOS

Voluntary

Sectional

Yes

No

Yes

SI

ZOS

Voluntary

Congruent

No

No

Yes

SK

ZMOS

Voluntary

Sectional

Yes

No

Yes

UK

COSLA

Voluntary

Congruent

Yes

No

Yes

UK

LGA

Voluntary

Sectional

Yes

No

Yes

UK

WLGA

Voluntary

Congruent

No

No

Yes

Notes: CB: Collective bargaining; CONS: consultations over employment regulations (that is talks and negotiations over employment regulation with no binding agreements); SD: Social dialogue and consultations over sectoral policies

Source: Eurofound’s Network of European correspondents (NEC), 2014

 

Table C2: National employer associations, membership* and affiliations

 

Organisation

Sectoral orgs.

Sectoral employees

Global affiliation

European affiliation

National affiliation

AT

Staedtebund

249

:

:

CEMR

:

AT

Gemeindebund

:

:

:

CEMR

:

BE

APW

11

10,972

:

European Confederation of Local Intermediate Authorities (CEPLI)

None

BE

AVCB-VSGB

73

50,549

:

CEMR

VBSG/

UVC

BE

UVCW

728

119,187

:

CEMR

VBSG/

UVC

BE

VVP

16

6,672

:

European Confederation of Local Intermediate Authorities (CEPLI)

None

BE

VVSG

928

201,208

:

CEMR

VBSG/

UVC

BG

UEESB

1,080

21,000

None

European School Heads Association (ESHA)

Bulgarian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (BCCI)

BG

ADEB

60

200

UCLG

None

Bulgarian Industrial Association (BIA)

CY

UCM-ΕΔΚ

39

3,200

UCLG

CEMR

0

CZ

SMO ČR

2,496

:

United Cities and Local Governments

CEMR

None

DE

Städtetag

3,400

:

None

CEMR

None

DE

DSTGB

12,100

:

None

CEMR

None

DE

Landkreistag

:

:

None

CEMR

None

DE

RGRE

800

:

None

CEMR

None

DE

TdL

15

750,000

None

EFEE

bvöd (German section of CEEP)

DE

VKA

:

1,560,000

None

CEEP

bvöd (German section of CEEP)

DK

Danske Regioner

5

128,390

None

CEEP, CEMR, HOPE, HOSPEEM, Council of Europe (Local and Regional Authorities) and CLRAE

None

DK

KL

98

515,623

None

CEEP, CEMR and CLRAE

None

EE

ELL

47

:

UCLG

CEMR, BSSSC, UBC

None

EE

EMOL

130

:

0

CEMR, BSSSC

None

EL

ENPE

13

:

None

CEMR

None

EL

KEDE

325

:

None

CEMR

None

ES

FEMP

7,333

:

None

CEMR

None

FI

KT

444

433,000

None

CEEP, CEMR, HOSPEEM, EFEE

None

FR

AFCCRE

:

:

UCLG

CEMR

None

GR

ENPE

13

:

None

CEMR

None

GR

KEDE

325

:

None

CEMR

None

HU

BÖSZ

23

:

None

None

None

HU

KÖOÉSZ

95

:

None

CLRAE, CEMR

None

HU

KÖSZ

95

:

None

None

None

HU

MFSZ

:

:

None

None

None

HU

MJVSZ

:

:

None

None

None

HU

MÖSZ

:

:

None

None

None

HU

TÖOSZ

3,500

110,000

None

CLRAE, CEMR

None

IE

LGMA

:

28,811

None

CEMR

None

IT

AICCRE

:

:

None

CEMR

None

IT

ARAN

8,522

502,453

None

CEEP, EFEE, HOSPEEM

None

LT

LSA

60

14,000

UCLG

CEMR

None

LU

SYVICOL

:

:

None

CEMR

None

LV

LPS

:

:

None

CEMR

None

MT

LCA

73

582

None

CEMR

None

NL

IPO

12

11,000

None

CEMR, CEEP

None

NL

VNG

508

170,000

None

CEMR, CEEP

None

PL

ZMP

303

:

UCLG

CEMR

None

PT

ANAFRE

2,380

:

None

CEMR, CLRAE

None

PT

ANMP

270

:

None

CEMR, CLRAE

None

RO

ACOR

2,861

:

None

CEMR

None

RO

AMR

109

:

None

CEMR

None

RO

AOR

217

:

None

CEMR

None

RO

UNCJR

42

:

None

CEMR, CPLL

None

SE

SKL

310

1,100,000

UCLG

CEMR, CEEP, HOSPEEM, EFEE

None

SI

SOS

174

:

None

CEMR, CLRAE

None

SI

ZMOS

10

1,387

None

None

None

SI

ZOS

141

:

None

None

None

SK

ZMOS

2,668

130,000

None

CEMR, CLRAE

None

UK

COSLA

32

278,700

None

CEMR

None

UK

LGA

400

1,800,000

None

CEMR, CEEP, EFEE

None

UK

WLGA

22

156,900

None

CEMR

None

* The number of national potential affiliates do not necessarily correspond to the figures in Table 4 in the main text, since those are generally taken by statistical sources. In this case, reference is essentially to employers and often to local and regional governments only.

Source: Eurofound’s Network of European correspondents (NEC), 2014

EF/15/03

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