News archive

149 items found

This news archive contains articles published from 2007 up the end of 2020. For current news, see Eurofound's latest stories.

  • 14 October 2015
    From the Treaty of Paris onwards, it took more than 30 years before the next decisive step was taken to promote Community social policy.  The roots of European social dialogue, strictly speaking, date back to the 1970s, when the Community social partners were consulted on European-level issues on an ad hoc basis.
  • 14 October 2015
    When relaunching social dialogue at a high-level conference in Brussels in March 2015, the European Commission acknowledged the role of social partners – specifically, their active participation and their involvement in all policies. In the EU context, social partners are viewed as an asset that – in respect of the principle of autonomy and subsidiarity – can make a contribution to achieving a safer working environment, more and better jobs, and support for employment and growth. Where do micro and small companies fit into this picture? What are the factors that can lead to the development of good working conditions, a favourable health and safety environment and robust social dialogue in small businesses – and how can this lead to a win–win situation for all involved?
  • 14 October 2015
    The new European Commission under President Jean-Claude Juncker is committed to relaunching social dialogue: a first step was taken with the organisation of a high-level conference in Brussels on 5 March 2015. The aim of the conference was to discuss concrete ways to strengthen social dialogue with EU cross-industry social partners and their national affiliates. On 21 and 22 April 2015, Ministers for Employment and Social Affairs in Riga again discussed – informally – ways towards a committed, realistic social dialogue.
  • 14 October 2015
    Social dialogue – whether conducted through tripartite concertation or bipartite dialogue in the Member States – is concerned with more than just topical issues: it also involves efforts to establish, readapt and revise the system of industrial relations. Eurofound’s most recent comparative analysis of developments in collective bargaining in Europe found that most legislative changes made over the past two decades have in fact bolstered the collective bargaining process (Eurofound, forthcoming). This article – based on contributions from Eurofound’s network of European correspondents – selects the most recent reforms and debates that are currently underway in the EU Member States.[1]
  • 14 October 2015
    Interview with David-Pascal Dion - Recently appointed Head of Unit for Social Dialogue and Industrial Relations at the European Commission’s Directorate General for Employment, Social Affairs and Inclusion, David-Pascal Dion discusses the Commission’s firm commitment to strengthening dialogue with social partners across Europe and its role in recent initiatives to reignite social dialogue.
  • 14 October 2015
    European works councils (EWCs) provide transnational information and consultation mechanisms for employee representatives in multinational companies (MNCs). In organising meetings between central management and employee representatives from the EU Member States in which the companies operate, the EWC builds a bridge between the headquarters where strategic decisions are made and the workplaces where these decisions have a concrete impact on employees. This bridge-building takes place across different cultures, interests and levels. As there are information and consultation mechanisms at European level, and also at workplace level, the way these different levels work together determines their efficiency.
  • 14 October 2015
    At the heart of industrial relations systems, collective bargaining plays an important role in the functioning of national economies and sectors, as well as in the social fabric of Member States and the European Union. Diversity – in terms of the actors and parties involved in negotiations, rules of procedure, topics on the agenda, outcomes and legal effects of the agreements – is widely acknowledged as one of its key features.
  • 14 October 2015
    Financial turmoil and the increasing globalisation of value chains have focused attention on how to stimulate economies across Europe by revitalising industrial policy. However, existing policy instruments need to be aligned to the realities of global competition and evolving technologies. The role of the state in this process is crucial, but it is clear the social partners also have a role to play. What instruments of industrial policy are currently used in Europe? What is the role of social dialogue and of the social partners in shaping them? How can social dialogue play a proactive role in the current landscape of policymaking?
  • 14 October 2015
    How has the crisis impacted on social dialogue in workplaces? Findings from Eurofound’s third European Company Survey show that, despite the crisis, many workplaces in Europe have managed to retain their well-functioning social dialogue practices. In fact, companies where social dialogue is working well report better company performance and overall workplace well-being. However, the research points to a sizeable minority of companies where social dialogue is characterised by a lack of resources, poor trust between management and employee representatives, and relatively high levels of industrial action.
  • 14 October 2015
    Despite the almost 60-year-old commitment to the goal, gender equality is far from being achieved in the European Union. The ‘moving targets’ – labour market participation, employment and unemployment rates, and other quantified objectives – do not make attaining gender equality across Europe any easier. Furthermore, there has been, at least in some academic and social circles, an evolution regarding the nature of the measures to be taken, with some experts suggesting that it might be better to shift from women-focused measures to more encompassing ones, addressing the situation of both men and women.

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