EMCC European Monitoring Centre on Change

Restructuring case studies

These case studies provide more than 150 examples of how private sector and public sector employers anticipate and manage restructuring. Such restructuring can occur for many reasons and can take different forms, from business expansion to the closure of the the firm.

The case studies illustrate the planning and implementation processes of organisational change as well as their outcomes. The aim is to inform governments, social partners, employers and others involved about how restructuring has been realised in European organisations and what lessons can be learned from these experiences.

212 items found (page 1 of 43)

Telefonica

30 November 2016
  • Spain
  • Organisation Size

    1000+

  • Establishment Size

    -

The Spanish company Telefónica is one of the world’s largest telecommunications companies with a strong presence in Europe, Africa and Latin America. In June 2006, it had around 220,000 employees, representing a growth of 23.5 per cent compared with the previous year. This growth was partly an effect of changes in the accountancy consolidation perimeter relating to its Atento group subsidiary. The worldwide spread of Telefónica presents major challenges for the development of a human resources policy capable of meeting the needs of every individual employee. 

  • Type of restructuring

    Internal restructuring

  • Ownership

    Private

  • Involved actors

    Business/employers organisation, National government

  • Anticipation of change activities

    Training/skill development, Strategic long-term monitoring of market and technological developments, Development and maintenance of capacities and competencies for anticipation of change, Continuous mapping of jobs and skills needs - Elaboration of training plans, Promotion of internal mobility

  • Management of change activities

    (Re)training of affected employees

keywords

no data

Food cluster in the Øresund region

30 November 2016
  • Denmark, Sweden
  • Organisation Size

    1000+

  • Establishment Size

    1000+

This report tells the story of the food cluster in the Øresund region, which is located in the areas of Sjælland in Denmark and Skåne in Sweden. The Øresund region is a major European innovation centre with forecast annual growth rates of 2–5 % for the years 2006 and 2007, higher than the economy as a whole. The cluster has developed as a result of the transition of the food sector in the region from holding activities, primarily directed towards the food industry, to food-science activities. 

  • Type of restructuring

    Business expansion, Internal restructuring

  • Ownership

    Private

  • Involved actors

    Business partners/supply chain, Education/training provider, Others

  • Anticipation of change activities

    Training/skill development, Strategic long-term monitoring of market and technological developments, Establishment of networks/partnerships with regular exchange facilities, R&D - innovation

  • Management of change activities

    no data

keywords

Regional aspects, Knowledge-intensive business sector, Clusters/Networks/Supply chains

Louis de Poortere

25 November 2016
  • Belgium
  • Prov. Hainaut
  • Organisation Size

    250-500

  • Establishment Size

    50-249

Louis de Poortere is a Belgian textiles company established in the 1920s, specialising in the manufacture of high-quality carpets for the international market. For many years, it was among the largest employers in the Belgian textiles sector, with approximately 3,000 employees in the 1970s. Mirroring the challenges facing the entire EU textiles sector over the past 20 years, Louis de Poortere has experienced difficulties linked to market liberalisation, globalisation and other factors impacting on the sector. The company had tried to adapt to new market conditions by divesting some of the less profitable parts of its business; despite these efforts, however, the company was declared bankrupt in August 2000.

  • Type of restructuring

    (Avoiding) bankruptcy

  • Ownership

    Private

  • Involved actors

    Trade union, Public employment service

  • Anticipation of change activities

    no data

  • Management of change activities

    Working time flexibility measures, Transition of affected employees to other employers, Flexible/early retirement schemes, Diagnosis of the situation and designing change procedures, Information and consultation of workers or their representatives

keywords

Business transfer and succession, Globalisation/Internationalisation

Legal services cluster in London City

25 November 2016
  • United Kingdom
  • Inner London
  • Organisation Size

    1000+

  • Establishment Size

    1000+

  The City of London is a centre of financial activity, characterised by a high concentration of banks and financial services providers, legal services, insurance companies and professional services companies. It also holds high numbers of companies offering business support industries, such as information technology (IT) and recruitment. Today, law firms are the largest single employer within the City of London. 

  • Type of restructuring

    Internal restructuring

  • Ownership

    Private

  • Involved actors

    Private consultants

  • Anticipation of change activities

    Strategic long-term monitoring of individual organisations economic and financial situation, Development and maintenance of capacities and competencies for anticipation of change

  • Management of change activities

    no data

keywords

Knowledge-intensive business sector, Clusters/Networks/Supply chains

Commerce Cluster in Birmingham

25 November 2016
  • United Kingdom
  • West Midlands
  • Organisation Size

    1000+

  • Establishment Size

    1000+

Birmingham is the regional capital of the West Midlands, which has a population of 5.3 million, a workforce of nearly 2.5 million and a client base of 182,000 companies. The city of Birmingham has a population of just over 1 million people. As a region, the gross value added (GVA) for the West Midlands is over ₤61.5 billion, while the GVA for Birmingham is ₤11.8 billion. Birmingham’s reputation as the powerhouse of the United Kingdom’s manufacturing sector was shaped in the Industrial Revolution of the 18th century. Traditional industries such as automotive and engineering remain a crucial part of the region’s success, but today, through a period of diversification, Birmingham has become a focal point for the development of knowledge-based industries, telecommunications and information technology. 

  • Type of restructuring

    Business expansion

  • Ownership

    Private

  • Involved actors

    Trade union, Regional/local government, Business partners/supply chain, Education/training provider

  • Anticipation of change activities

    Strategic long-term monitoring of individual organisations economic and financial situation, Establishment of networks/partnerships with regular exchange facilities, Continuous mapping of jobs and skills needs - Elaboration of training plans

  • Management of change activities

    no data

keywords

Regional aspects, Clusters/Networks/Supply chains

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