EurWORK European Observatory of Working Life

Articles

EurWORK articles cover working life in Europe, in particular the fields of industrial relations and working conditions. The articles are based on quarterly reporting provided by the Network of Eurofound Correspondents.

  • Topical updates summarise and update developments around selected topics, which are relevant across a number of Member States at the same time
  • Spotlight reports cover in more depth country-level events, debates and changes in regulation related to working life, aiming to provide a balanced view of all parties’ positions
  • Research in Focus articles report on important research findings (including surveys) from the national level, often, but not exclusively, in the area of working conditions
  • In brief articles are short news items drawn from the correspondents' quarterly reports
  • Country updates summarise developments at national level and are published 4 times a year

13879 items found
  • Commission publishes amended proposal on transfer of undertakings

    The European Commission has published its amended proposal for a Council Directive amending Directive 77/187/EEC on the safeguarding of employees' rights in the event of transfers of undertakings. The amended proposal reflects the Opinions submitted by the Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions, as well as the many amendments put forward by the European Parliament. Soon after the publication of the amended draft, the Commission also issued a Memorandum on the interpretation of the Directive (Record EU9703109F [1]) [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/undefined/commission-issues-memorandum-on-transfer-of-undertakings
  • NHO reports increase in membership

    The number of member companies of the Confederation of Norwegian Business and Industry (NHO) increased by around 2,000 during 1996. NHO aims for a further growth in membership towards the year 2000.
  • New agreement on cooperation and bargaining procedure in Swedish industry

    On 18 March 1997, eight trade unions and 12 employers' organisations in industry concluded an agreement on cooperation and the regulation of pay. Its aim is to promote growth, profitability and competitiveness in industry. As such, claim the parties, it will provide the necessary prerequisite for a reduction of unemployment and form the basis for improvements in pay and good working conditions.
  • Higher Council for Employment: a new body to support employment policies

    To give impetus to Belgian employment policies, the Federal Government has recently created a new body to advise on its decision-making and to speed up the monitoring of employment trends.
  • UNICE outlines its vision for the future of the European social dialogue

    In its response to the Commission's September 1996 Communication on the development of the social dialogue (see Record EU9702102F [1]), UNICE (the Union of Industrial and Employers' Confederations of Europe) welcomes the opportunity for debate and calls for a reinforcement of consultation with the social partners. However, it argues that the treatment of fundamentally different processes in one Communication adds a source of confusion to the debate. These varied processes include: the consultation and negotiation within the meaning of Article 118B of the EC Treaty and Article 3.1 of the Agreement on social policy; Advisory Committees; the Standing Committee on Employment; the joint sectoral committees and informal working groups; tripartite bodies; joint operational initiatives; European Works Councils, and the social dialogue in trans-boundary region. UNICE feels that the Communication should have: [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/undefined-industrial-relations/the-future-of-the-social-dialogue-at-community-level
  • Ministry of Employment clarifies controversial Law on Working Time Reduction

    Law 21/96, which aims to reduce the working week to 40 hours, has given rise to labour disputes in certain sectors and some controversial statements. An official communication released by the Secretary of State for Employment in March attempts to shed light on the areas of concern.
  • Trends in collective bargaining since 1994

    The major labour market reform legislation of 1994 made important changes to the framework for collective bargaining in Spain. This feature examines bargaining trends since 1994, and analyses the positions of the parties involved and the results of the reform.
  • More flexibility in Sunday working

    On 19 March 1997, Parliament passed a reform of the Arbeitszeitgesetz(AZG, Working Time Act) - see Record AT9702102F [1]. This necessitated minor changes to the Arbeitsruhegesetz(ARG, Leisure Time Act) which were also passed on 19 March. However, the parliamentary Labour and Social Affairs Committee, at the behest of the social partners, had introduced wording allowing more flexibility than hitherto in regard to Sunday work, causing a major public debate in its wake. In future it will be possible for the social partners to conclude collective agreements permitting exceptions from the general ban on Sunday work. They can only do so, the law states, if it is necessary in order to avoid economic disadvantage or to safeguard employment. As far as this is feasible, the collective agreement has to specify the activities to be permissible on Sundays and the time allowed for them. Until now it was not possible to grant specific exemptions from the ban on Sunday work except if the technology required continuous production. The Minister of Labour and Social Affairs could, however, permit a whole industry to work on Sundays. [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/undefined-law-and-regulation/moves-towards-greater-working-time-flexibility
  • Bill on combating exclusion under discussion.

    On 26 February 1997, the French Cabinet adopted a bill aiming at rebuilding social cohesion, which is to be debated in the National Assembly some time in April 1997.
  • France and UK compete for Toyota investment

    The UK has been the main recipient of Toyota's European investment so far, at its plant in Derby. If the UK were to lose the new investment to France, it would be a huge blow to the Government which recently had to "rebuild some fences" after the company announced in February 1997 that it might switch its investment elsewhere in Europe if the UK did not join the single European currency.

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