EurWORK European Observatory of Working Life

Articles

EurWORK articles cover working life in Europe, in particular the fields of industrial relations and working conditions. The articles are based on quarterly reporting provided by the Network of Eurofound Correspondents.

  • Topical updates summarise and update developments around selected topics, which are relevant across a number of Member States at the same time
  • Spotlight reports cover in more depth country-level events, debates and changes in regulation related to working life, aiming to provide a balanced view of all parties’ positions
  • Research in Focus articles report on important research findings (including surveys) from the national level, often, but not exclusively, in the area of working conditions
  • In brief articles are short news items drawn from the correspondents' quarterly reports
  • Country updates summarise developments at national level and are published 4 times a year

13845 items found
  • Union wins landmark equal pay cases

    The cases have been hailed as a major victory for all National Health Service (NHS) staff by the Manufacturing, Science and Finance (MSF) trade union, which represented the workers involved in their cases. The union's national secretary, Roger Kline said that the: "case is a momentous one. It has implications for women staff throughout the NHS and other industries. It is a landmark decision and is the biggest single breakthrough on equal pay for women for many years."
  • Bargaining round extends voluntary early retirement scheme

    On 6 April 1997, the Norwegian Confederation of Trade Unions (LO) and the Confederation of Norwegian Business and Industry (NHO) agreed on a proposal for an agreement which they could recommend to their members in this year's bargaining round. LO won acceptance for its demands on the extension of the voluntary early retirement scheme, while the pay increases agreed centrally may be described as moderate.
  • Ban on women's night work to be reviewed

    On 8 April 1997, Jacques Barrot, the Minister for Employment, gave the press a preview of the forthcoming legislation on the reduction of social security contributions and the statutory working week. Among the subjects dealt with will be a revision of existing legislation on banning women from working at night, which Mr Barrot deems necessary.
  • New rules for pay determination claimed to lead to better agreements

    On 15 April 1997 the Minister for Equal Opportunities Affairs, Labour Law and Working Hours, Ms Ulrica Messing, declared that she intends to set up an official committee to propose measures to improve the functioning of the pay determination process. She hoped that some of these measures could come into force before the start of next year's bargaining round.
  • TAP-Air Portugal pilots react against loss of compensation

    Workers at TAP-Air Portugal issued a general notice to strike on 24-25 April 1997 in protest at revised flight and rest-time schedules
  • Volkswagen gives up on internal temporary employment agency

    On 2 April 1997 it became public that during the ongoing collective bargaining at the German automobile company, Volkswagen, management had made a proposal to create a new "internal temporary employment agency" (Zeitarbeitsgesellschaft). Depending on the incoming orders, the agency's newly hired employees would be set to work at the different Volkswagen plants. Volkswagen proposed to pay the new temporary employees under the terms and conditions of the current branch-level collective agreement in the metalworking industry.
  • Last wages council sets minimum wage of over GBP 4.00 per hour

    A new pay award announced in April by the Agricultural Wages Board (AWB) for England and Wales after two days of talks, gives farm workers a minimum wage of GBP 4.12 per hour. The AWB is the only wages council - setting statutory minimum pay rates for a particular sector - left in the UK after the rest were abolished in 1993 (UK9703112F [1]). When the Conservative Government was originally looking at abolishing the wages councils in 1986, the proposal was delayed because employers were not in favour of them being abolished, as they at least set some minimum floor of standards with which employers could work. The case for this was made most strongly by agricultural employers, and this was why the AWB was left in place after 1993. [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/undefined/a-national-minimum-wage-who-what-and-why
  • Labour Inspectorate report indicates increased compliance with law

    The annual report of the Labour Inspectorate (Arbeitsinspektion) for 1995, has now become available to the public after debate in parliament. The Arbeitsinspektion's activities are regulated by the 1993 Labour Inspection Act (Arbeitsinspektionsgesetz, ArbIG). This stipulates that the Labour Inspectorate has to contribute through its activities to an effective protection of employees, and especially has to watch over compliance with protective legal regulations and to inform and support employers and employees accordingly. The Labour Inspectorate has free access to all places of employment as well as housing and accommodation and welfare institutions. Exceptions are places of employment covered by other organisations - as in agriculture and forestry, mining, areas of the transport sector and public education - as well as religious buildings, private households, and offices of the territorial administration.
  • New-style package agreed at Deutsche Telekom AG

    On 9 April 1997, the telecommunication conglomerate Deutsche Telekom AG and the Deutsche Postgewerkschaft (DPG) postal workers' union signed a package of enterprise-level collective agreements for the employees at the Telekom subsidiary Deutsche Telekom Mobilnet GmbH (DeTeMobil). After five months of negotiations, this package represents the first such collective agreement in the mobile telephony industry since the beginning of the step-by-step liberalisation of the telecommunications sector.
  • Commissioner Flynn outlines priorities and current status of IGC

    Speaking at the Institute of European Affairs in Dublin, Padraig Flynn, the commissioner for employment, industrial relations and social affairs, outlined his priorities for the Intergovernmental Conference (IGC) and provided the audience with an update of the continuing negotiations leading up the Amsterdam summit in June (EU9704117F [1]). [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/undefined/progress-of-the-intergovernmental-conference

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