EurWORK European Observatory of Working Life

Attractive workplace for all

These 102 cases, dating from 2006-2007, are examples of 'win-win situations', showing that it is possible to combine quality of work and employment with economic performance. They deal with key dimensions of the Lisbon strategy such as employability, increasing the labour market participation of underrepresented groups and people at risk of exclusion, pay, flexibility, and business creation and entrepreneurship. The involvement of the social partners at company and sectoral level is a significant aspect of the development of these policies and their outcomes.

102 items found (page 1 of 11)

Philips, the Netherlands: Integration into the labour market of people at risk of exclusion – early school-leavers

  • Netherlands
Royal Philips Electronics is one of the world’s leading electronics companies. In 1982, the company introduced the ‘Philips Employment Scheme’ which originally was targeted at young and unemployed school-leavers, offering training and work experience for people with limited opportunities in the labour market. At a later stage, the initiative came to include other groups of people such as women returning to work and persons with disabilities. By 2004, over 11,000 people had benefited from the employment scheme.
  • Category

    integrating people at risk of exclusion into the labour market

Newcastle Building Society, UK: Towards a balanced flexibility

  • United Kingdom
Newcastle Building Society is a relatively small financial institution operating in the highly competitive home loans market, where it has to survive among banks and building societies that are many times its size. The company has invested in technical systems that allow it more flexibility in how it deploys its staff. It regards flexible working as a way of boosting productivity while at the same time responding to the demands of its employees.
  • Category

    Towards a balanced flexibility

OKG, Sweden: Fostering employability

  • Sweden
OKG produces electric energy at its nuclear plant in Oscarshamn. The group supports competence development through a competence assurance system and a local agreement. The employees have regular training for five to 10 days a year. On top of this, they receive support for advanced training (days off and course materials and travel expenses for long-distance training). All this is decided between the employee and the line manager.
  • Category

    Fostering employability

University of Siena, Italy: Towards a balanced flexibility

  • Italy
In February 2005, the University of Siena and the Italian confederate and autonomous trade union organisations representing education workers signed an agreement aimed at regulating and extending the labour and social rights of temporary employees. The agreement, the first of its kind, provides maternity, sickness and occupational accident coverage and lays down fixed deadlines for the payment of annual earnings.
  • Category

    Towards a balanced flexibility

Vodafone Omnitel, Italy: Make work pay – make work attractive

  • Italy
In July 2004, the Vodafone Group introduced a new share scheme, called Allshares. The Vodafone Group distributes shares free of charge to all full-time staff, including the approximately 10,000 employees who work for Vodafone Italia. In this way, Vodafone rewards its entire staff for their contribution to the Company's future and gives everyone, regardless of their role or status within the organisation, a chance to play a part in its success.
  • Category

    Making work pay

Ford, UK: Business creation and entrepreneurship

  • United Kingdom
In 2000, the Ford Motor Company announced its decision to end vehicle assembly at its main UK production site in Dagenham in east London. As a result, the company wished to make a concerted effort to help compensate for the loss of employment at the site and its resulting impact on the local economy. In conjunction with local colleges, Ford established and developed the Centre for Engineering and Manufacturing Excellence, along with a business incubation centre.
  • Category

    Business creation and entrepreneurship

VX Company, the Netherlands: Fostering employability

  • Netherlands
VX Company is an IT company whose employees work all over the country with client companies. In this type of organisation, it is more difficult to achieve organisational learning and competence development. Therefore, the company has created a system to support the employability of their employees. The policy seems to be successful and the company was elected as best employer by an organisation called Great Place to Work.
  • Category

    Fostering employability

Marazzi, Italy: Increasing the labour market participation of underrepresented groups – women

  • Italy
In December 2004, the Italian company Marazzi Ceramiche S.p.A. and the sectoral trade union organisations signed a new company agreement for the plants located in Sassuolo and Fiorano. The agreement provides for more suitable shifts and working time for working mothers until their child reaches the age of three years. Furthermore, it provides a subsidy of 50 euros per month to help working mothers pay for day-care facilities for a maximum period of 18 months.
  • Category

    increasing labour market participation of underrepresented groups

E.ON Energy, Germany: Increasing the labour market participation of underrepresented groups – young people

  • Germany
E.ON Energie, one of the leading private energy service providers in Europe, is involved in various training promotion programmes. The aim is to improve job opportunities for young people on the labour market. Both top management and the works councils of the E.ON Energie Group are fully supportive of the programmes offered.
  • Category

    increasing labour market participation of underrepresented groups

Laboratoires Boiron, France: Towards a balanced flexibility

  • France
Laboratoires Boiron, a French group that produces and distributes homeopathic remedies, has implemented a policy for greater working flexibility. By means of several collective agreements, the organisation has sought to strike a balance between the interest of the company and the needs of the workers. Collective bargaining within the company has often anticipated the evolution of French legislation – for instance, in the area of working time reduction.
  • Category

    Towards a balanced flexibility

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