EurWORK European Observatory of Working Life

Attractive workplace for all

These 102 cases, dating from 2006-2007, are examples of 'win-win situations', showing that it is possible to combine quality of work and employment with economic performance. They deal with key dimensions of the Lisbon strategy such as employability, increasing the labour market participation of underrepresented groups and people at risk of exclusion, pay, flexibility, and business creation and entrepreneurship. The involvement of the social partners at company and sectoral level is a significant aspect of the development of these policies and their outcomes.

102 items found (page 1 of 11)

Eni Group, Italy: Fostering employability

  • Italy
In July 2002, Eni, Emcef (European Mine, Chemical and Energy Workers’ Federation) and the Italian trade unions signed an agreement aimed at defining an experimental European learning programme in order to develop and improve intercultural communication among the diverse production sites. The learning programme has been offered to 140 employees from central and eastern Europe, who differ with respect to qualifications, age, nationality, professional status, cultural context and workplace.
  • Category

    Fostering employability

E+E Electronics, Austria: Towards a balanced flexibility

  • Austria
E+E Electronics, a developer and producer of electronic sensors and transmitters, employs 180 people at its site in Austria. In an initiative funded by the provincial government, representatives of the employees, the company and the social partners have created a new model of working time, whereby function-related core time has been replaced by person-related core time. It has delegated responsibility for working time organisation to the employees, who appreciate the greater freedom.
  • Category

    Towards a balanced flexibility

Unipol Banca, Italy: Make work pay – make work attractive

  • Italy
Unipol Banca and the trades unions signed an agreement introducing a company savings scheme that is financed by means of three different sources: a percentage of the worker’s wage, a percentage of the end-of-employment allowance and a consistent contribution provided directly by the company. The bank, through an insurance company, foresees minimum guaranteed earnings. The company contribution to the scheme is higher than the average rate, and negotiation impacts on the final amount of contributions.
  • Category

    Making work pay

WHSmith, France: Towards a balanced flexibility

  • France
WHSmith France is a bookseller with 50 employees. In 1998, the company concluded a collective agreement that reduced working time to 35 hours a week. Work organisation resulting from this agreement is based on the versatility of workers and on a direct and informal dialogue between workers and management regarding working time organisation. The organisation that has been put in place has allowed the company to extend the shop’s opening hours and days and thus deal better with its competitors.
  • Category

    Towards a balanced flexibility

Sätra Brunn, Sweden: Towards a balanced flexibility

  • Sweden
In the service sector, personnel costs form a large proportion of total costs, so matching staff numbers to customer demand is vital. At Sätra Brunn, a health spa in Sweden, the management and the local union have reached an agreement including a high degree of flexibility and increasing the influence that employees can exert over their work schedules.
  • Category

    Towards a balanced flexibility

Sanofi-aventis, France: Business creation and entrepreneurship

  • France
For the past 20 years, sanofi-aventis, an international group in the pharmaceutical sector, has adopted a policy aimed at supporting business creation. This policy concerns all employees on a voluntary basis and operates independently of any restructuring process. It is implemented by a dedicated unit, which provides support to workers willing to set up their own business. Since 1987, some 1,000 employees have benefited from individual support.
  • Category

    Business creation and entrepreneurship

EDF, France: Integration into the labour market of people at risk of exclusion – people with disabilities

  • France
  • Category

    integrating people at risk of exclusion into the labour market

Henkel, Germany: Increasing the labour market participation of underrepresented groups – women

  • Germany
In recent years, Henkel has promoted progressive family policies. In 2005, Henkel’s support for balancing family and employment commitments was acknowledged by the ministry for family, senior citizens, women and youth. Henkel’s family policy is marked by an awareness that its ability to remain competitive will depend increasingly on its capacity to offer its workforce exemplary employment terms and conditions.
  • Category

    increasing labour market participation of underrepresented groups

Spectra Collection, Sweden: Integration into the labour market of people at risk of exclusion – long-term unemployed

  • Sweden
Spectra Collection AB, a wood manufacturing company, initiated a training programme which was aimed at providing long-term unemployed persons with the training needed to become wood industry workers. The training course included eight weeks of theoretical training and 32 weeks of on-the-job training in companies. Five participants of the programme did their practical training at Spectra Collection, and four of these were subsequently hired by the company after completing the training programme.
  • Category

    integrating people at risk of exclusion into the labour market

City of Stockholm, Sweden: Integration into the labour market of people at risk of exclusion – early school-leavers

  • Sweden
  • Category

    integrating people at risk of exclusion into the labour market

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