Digital age

Telework and ICT-based mobile work: Flexible working in the digital age

Report
Uaktualniono
28 Lipiec 2020
Opublikowane
16 Styczeń 2020
pdf
Formaty
Executive summary in 22 languages
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Kluczowe ustalenia

  • Digitalisation and the advent of more flexible work organisation are changing working time patterns. Working time for workers who do telework and ICT-based mobile work (TICTM) is more porous, irregular and unpredictable.
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  • Digitalisation and the advent of more flexible work organisation are changing working time patterns. Working time for workers who do telework and ICT-based mobile work (TICTM) is more porous, irregular and unpredictable.
  • TICTM can have clear benefits for people’s work–life balance, enabling them to adapt their working time to their private and family-related needs. However, these types of work arrangement can also lead to an intensification of work, even where workers have high levels of autonomy – a situation known as the autonomy paradox.
  • TICTM and other work environments characterised by high ICT use can pose health risks for workers: stress, anxiety, headaches and eye-strain are downsides linked these environments.
  • Virtual presenteeism is an increasing phenomenon in the digitalised work context and specifically among TICTM workers. While it might benefit workers by enabling them to carry out tasks while sick, it can also jeopardise their health and reduce performance.
  • Contrary to common perception, not all workers with a TICTM arrangement are high-flyers with better-than-average working conditions. Around one in four are in jobs with precarious conditions, including lack of access to training, low wages and job insecurity.
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Podsumowanie

Advances in ICT have opened the door to new ways of organising work. We are shifting from a regular, bureaucratic and ‘factory-based’ working time pattern towards a more flexible model of work. Telework and ICT-based mobile work (TICTM) has emerged in this transition, giving workers and employersRead more

Advances in ICT have opened the door to new ways of organising work. We are shifting from a regular, bureaucratic and ‘factory-based’ working time pattern towards a more flexible model of work. Telework and ICT-based mobile work (TICTM) has emerged in this transition, giving workers and employers the ability to adapt the time and location of work to their needs. Despite the flexibility and higher level of worker autonomy inherent in TICTM, there are risks that this work arrangement leads to the deterioration of work–life balance, higher stress levels and failing worker health. This report analyses the employment and working conditions of workers with TICTM arrangements, focusing on how it affects their work–life balance, health, performance and job prospects. While policymakers in many EU countries are debating TICTM and its implications, the study finds that only a few have implemented new regulations to prevent TICTM from having a negative impact on the well-being of workers.

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Formaty

  • Report

    Last updated date: 
    23 sty 2020
    Number of pages: 
    66
    Reference no.: 
    EF19032
    ISBN: 
    978-92-897-2043-4
    Catalogue no.: 
    TJ-04-20-008-EN-N
    DOI: 
    10.2806/337167
    Catalogue info

    Telework and ICT-based mobile work: Flexible working in the digital age

    An new version of this report with minor corrections was published on 23 January 2020.

    Formaty

    Cite this publication: 

    Eurofound (2020), Telework and ICT-based mobile work: Flexible working in the digital age, New forms of employment series, Publications Office of the European Union, Luxembourg.

  • Executive summary

    Reference no.: 
    EF19032EN1
    Catalogue info

    Telepraca i mobilna praca wykorzystująca technologie informacyjno-komunikacyjne: elastyczna praca w epoce cyfrowej

    Author(s): 
    Eurofound

    Postępy w dziedzinie ICT otworzyły drogę do nowych sposobów organizacji pracy. Odchodzimy od regularnego, biurokratycznego, „fabrycznego” czasu pracy na rzecz bardziej elastycznego modelu organizacji pracy. W ramach tej transformacji pojawiła się telepraca i mobilna praca wykorzystująca technologie informacyjno-komunikacyjne, umożliwiając pracownikom i pracodawcom dostosowanie czasu i miejsca pracy do swoich potrzeb.

    Pomimo elastyczności czasu i większej autonomii pracowników w ramach telepracy i mobilnej pracy wykorzystującej ICT, istnieje ryzyko, że taki rodzaj pracy prowadzi do pogorszenia równowagi między życiem zawodowym a prywatnym, wyższego poziomu stresu i pogorszenia stanu zdrowia pracowników. Niniejsze sprawozdanie zawiera analizę warunków zatrudnienia i pracy osób korzystających z telepracy i mobilnej pracy wykorzystującej ICT, koncentrując się na tym, w jaki sposób wpływa ona na równowagę między życiem zawodowym a prywatnym, zdrowie, wyniki i perspektywy zatrudnienia. Chociaż decydenci w wielu krajach UE debatują nad telepracą i mobilną pracą wykorzystującą ICT oraz jej skutkami, w badaniu stwierdzono, że zaledwie kilka z nich wprowadziło w życie nowe przepisy zapobiegające negatywnemu wpływowi takiego systemu pracy na dobrostan pracowników.

    Available for download in 22 languages

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  • Working papers

    Related working papers

  • Tables and graphs

    Tables

    • Table 1: Work arrangements compared in the report

    Graphs

    • Figure 1: Shares of workers by type of work arrangement, EU28, 2015
    • Figure 2: Shares of workers (employees and self-employed) with a TICTM arrangement (%), Member States, 2015
    • Figure 3: Prevalence of types of work arrangement, by sector, EU28, 2015
    • Figure 4: Shares of workers with a TICTM arrangement, by sector and occupation (%), EU28, 2015
    • Figure 5: Shares of workers, by TICTM type, gender and age, EU28, 2015
    • Figure 6: Factors influencing the impact of TICTM on work–life balance
    • Figure 7: Correlation between flexible working time and TICTM, Member States, 2015
    • Figure 8: Scores on autonomy index, by work arrangement, EU28 and five Member States, 2015
    • Figure 9: Shares of workers who rarely or never have enough time to do their job (%), by work arrangement, EU28, 2015
    • Figure 10: Scores on work intensity index, by work arrangement, EU28 and five Member States, 2015
    • Figure 11: Shares of workers reporting working more than 48 hours per week (%), by work arrangement, EU28, 2015
    • Figure 12: Shares of workers reporting a reduced rest period (%), by work arrangement, EU28, 2015
    • Figure 13: Scores on working time quality index, by work arrangement, EU28 and five Member States, 2015
    • Figure 14: Shares of workers reporting work–home interference (%), by work arrangement, EU28, 2015
    • Figure 15: Shares of workers reporting work–life balance problems (%), by work arrangement and presence or absence of children, EU28, 2015
    • Figure 16: Conceptual model for exploring the relationship between health and ICT use at work
    • Figure 17: Association of job demands and job resources with health outcomes
    • Figure 18: Effect of ICT use at work on health outcomes
    • Figure 19: Shares of workers reporting headaches and eyestrain (%), by frequency of ICT use, EU28, 2015
    • Figure 20: Shares of workers reporting stress, anxiety and fatigue by frequency of ICT use (%), EU28, 2015
    • Figure 21: Shares of workers reporting presenteeism, by frequency of ICT use (%), EU28, 2015
    • Figure 22: Effect of TICTM on health outcomes
    • Figure 23: Association of types of work arrangements and health outcomes
    • Figure 24: Shares of workers reporting fatigue, headaches and eyestrain, and anxiety (%), by work arrangement, EU28, 2015
    • Figure 25: Shares of workers reporting presenteeism (%), by work arrangement, EU28, 2015
    • Figure 26: Monthly average earnings in euro, by work arrangement, EU28, 2015
    • Figure 27: Shares of workers who received employer-paid training (%), by work arrangement, EU28, 2015
    • Figure 28: Shares of workers who participated in on-the-job training, by work arrangement (%), EU28, 2015
    • Figure 29: Shares of workers who report that their job offers good prospects for career advancement (%), by work arrangement, EU28, 2015
    • Figure 30: Highest level of regulation linking TICTM and work–life balance, by Member State
    • Figure 31: Approximate coverage of regulations that include TICTM linked to work–life balance, Member States
    • Figure 32: Presence and nature of legislation linking TICTM and work–life balance, Member States

Part of the series

  • New forms of employment

    This series reports on the new forms of employment emerging across Europe that are driven by societal, economic and technological developments and are different from traditional standard or non-standard employment in a number of ways. This series explores what characterises these new employment forms and what implications they have for working conditions and the labour market.

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