Representativeness of trade unions and employer associations in the sea fisheries sector - Cyprus

  • Observatory: EurWORK
  • Topic:
  • Employee representation,
  • Social partners,
  • Published on: 06 Marzec 2012



About
Country:
Cyprus
Author:
Institution:

In Cyprus, the sea fisheries sector plays a negligible role in relation to employment, where the sectoral aggregate employment accounted for 0.04% of total employment in 2009. As far as representation and collective bargaining are concerned, the sector is dominated by very small personal enterprises with 104 out of a total of 115 companies having no employees at all. In the remaining 11 companies, terms and conditions of employment are determined at a personal level.

Sectoral properties

Important introductory note

There is a lack of representation and collective bargaining in the sea fisheries sector, mainly because the sector is mostly made up of very small personal enterprises which have no employees at all. According to data provided by the Statistical Service of Cyprus, out of a total of 115 companies in 2009, 104 were registered as self employed and only 11 were limited companies, employing an average of two employees. According to Panagrotikos Farmers’ Union, the sector’s sole employer organisation, terms and conditions of employment are determined at personal level. Panagrotikos Farmers’ Union says it represents approximately 60% of the companies active in the sector, but could not supply exact figures. The union was also unable to provide information on its domain with regard to the sector, or in terms of its domain and sectoral density.

Economic background

No data supplied.

Development of employment

Table 1: Sectoral properties
  1999 2009
Number of companies in the sector

No data available

115 companies

Source of company data  

Business Register

Aggregate employment  

138 persons

Male employment  

n/a

Female employment  

n/a

Share of sectoral employment in %  

0.04%

Source of employment figures  

Business Register

Comment

Out of the 138 people employed in the sector, 104 are self employed and 34 are employees

2. The sector’s trade unions and employer associations

This section includes the following trade unions and employer associations:

(i) trade unions which are party to sector-related collective bargaining (In line with the conceptual remarks outlined in the background information included in the accompanying excel spreadsheet, we understand sector-related collective bargaining as any kind of collective bargaining within the sector, i.e. single-employer bargaining as well as multi-employer bargaining. For the definition of single- and multi-employer bargaining, see 4.2)

(ii) trade unions which are a sector-related member of the sector-related European Union Federation (i.e. ETF – European Transport Workers’ Federation)

(iii) employer associations which are a party to sector-related collective bargaining

(iv) employer associations (business associations) which are a sector-related member of the sector-related European Employer/Business Federations (i.e. EUROPECHE and COGECA – General Confederation of Agricultural Cooperatives in the European Union)

2a Overview of the industrial relations landscape in the sector

Please include a brief overview of the IR landscape in the sector (3-5 sentences) – summarising the most important features of industrial relations structures in the sector (based on the fact sheets – but without going into detail.)

Please also report here, whether the crisis had an impact on the sector’s relevant social partner organisations (e.g. mergers, emergence of new interest organisations, impact on membership structure, important social partner activities/achievements in the sector during the crisis etc.).

2b Data on the trade unions

There are no active trade unions in the fisheries sector in Cyprus.

2c Data on the employer associations

Table 2: Employers organisation Fact sheet: Panagrotikos Farmers’ Union
Affiliation to international level organisations  
Affiliation to European-level organisations

COPA-COGECA

Affiliation to national-level organisations

.

Engagement in sector-related collective bargaining

no

Consultation in sector-related matters

no

Type of Membership

voluntary

Organisation's domain with regard to sector  
Domain overlap with other organisations in sector

no

Domain overlaps occur with the following organisations  
  2009
Number of member companies, total

60% of the companies active in the sector

   
Number of employees in member companies total      
Number of member companies in sector      
Number of employees in member companies in sector      
Source of membership figures

Social Partner estimate

Domain density - companies      
Sectoral density - companies      
Sectoral domain density - companies      
Domain density - employees      
Sectoral density - employees      
Sectoral domain density - employees      
Description of organisation's domain with regard to sector

Please describe the organisation's domain

Representation of particular subgroups of entreprises

Please describe.

3. Inter-associational relationships

3a Inter-union relationships

3a.1 Please list all trade unions covered by this study whose domains overlap.

Not applicable, because there are no active trade unions in the fisheries sector.

3a.2 Do rivalries and competition exist among the trade unions, concerning the right to conclude collective agreements and to be consulted in public policy formulation and implementation?

Not applicable

3a.3 If yes, are certain trade unions excluded from these rights?

Not applicable

3b Inter-employer association relationships

3b.1 Please list all employer associations covered by this study whose domains overlap.

Not applicable, since Panagrotikos Farmers’ Union is the only employer association in the sector.

3b.2 Do rivalries and competition exist among the employer associations, concerning the right to conclude collective agreements and to be consulted in public policy formulation and implementation?

Not applicable

3b.3 If yes, are certain employer associations excluded from these rights?

Not applicable

3b.4 Are there large companies or employer associations which refuse to recognise the trade unions and refuse to enter collective bargaining?

No

4. The system of collective bargaining

4.1. Estimate the sector’s rate of collective bargaining coverage (i.e. the ratio of the number of employees covered by any kind of collective agreement to the total number of employees in the sector).

As stated above, there is a lack of representation and collective bargaining in the sea fisheries sector mainly because the sector is dominated by very small personal enterprises which mostly have no employees. In this context, according to Panagrotikos Farmers’ Union, terms and conditions of employment are determined at personal level.

4.2. Estimate the relative importance of multi-employer agreements and of single-employer agreements as a percentage of the total number of employees covered. (Multi-employer bargaining is defined as being conducted by an employer association on behalf of the employer side. In the case of single-employer bargaining, it is the company or its subunit(s) which is the party to the agreement. This includes the cases where two or more companies jointly negotiate an agreement.)

Not applicable

4.2.1. Is there a practice of extending multi-employer agreements to employers who are not affiliated to the signatory employer associations?

Not applicable

4.2.2. If there is a practice of extending collective agreements, is this practice pervasive or rather limited and exceptional?

Not applicable

4.3. List all sector-related multi-employer wage agreements* valid in 2008 (or most recent data), including for each agreement information on the signatory parties and the purview of the agreement in terms of branches, types of employees and territory covered.

Not applicable

* Only wage agreements which are (re)negotiated on a reiterated basis.

4.4. List the sector’s four most important collective agreements (single-employer or multi-employer agreements) valid in 2008 (or most recent data), including for each agreement information on the signatory parties and the purview of the agreement in terms of branches, types of employees and territory covered. Importance is measured in terms of employees covered.

Not applicable

5. Formulation and implementation of sector-specific public policies

5.1. Are the sector’s employer associations and trade unions usually consulted by the authorities in sector-specific matters? If yes, which associations?

No

5.2. Do tripartite bodies dealing with sector-specific issues exist? If yes, please indicate their domain of activity (for instance, health and safety, equal opportunities, labour market, social security and pensions etc.), their origin (agreement/statutory) and the interest organisations having representatives in them:

No

6. Statutory regulations of representativeness

6a Statutory regulations of representativeness for trade unions

6a.1 In the case of the trade unions, do statutory regulations exist which establish criteria of representativeness which a union must meet, so as to be entitled to conclude collective agreements? If yes, please briefly illustrate these rules and list the organisations which meet them.

With regard to statutory regulations of representativeness, as in other sectors of economic activity, the right to collective bargaining in the sea fisheries sector is guaranteed and safeguarded under the country’s Constitution of 1960, Article 26(2). The system of collective bargaining has been developed in the framework of the Industrial Relations Code; the latter applies to all sectors of economic activity, except central government. In terms of representativeness, in order to set up a trade union, certain regulations need to be adhered to, in accordance with the Trade Union Laws as amended from 1965–1996. More specifically, a minimum of 21 employees are required in the company, with all provisions for setting up the trade union followed in accordance with the law. Furthermore, the trade union should be registered with the Trade Union Register.

In the case of the trade unions, do statutory regulations exist which establish criteria of representativeness which a union must meet, so as to be entitled to be consulted in matters of public policy and to participate in tripartite bodies? If yes, please briefly illustrate these rules and list the organisations which meet them.

No

6a.3 Are elections for a certain representational body (e.g. works councils) established as criteria for trade union representativeness? If yes, please report the most recent electoral outcome for the sector.

No

6b Statutory regulations of representativeness for employer organisations

6b.1 In the case of the employer organisations, do statutory regulations exist which establish criteria of representativeness which an organisation must meet, so as to be entitled to conclude collective agreements? If yes, please briefly illustrate these rules and list the organisations which meet them.

No

6b.2 In the case of the employer organisations, do statutory regulations exist which establish criteria of representativeness which an organisation must meet, so as to be entitled to be consulted in matters of public policy and to participate in tripartite bodies? If yes, please briefly illustrate these rules and list the organisations which meet them.

No

6b.3 Are elections for a certain representational body established as criteria for the representativeness of employer associations? If yes, please report the most recent outcome for the sector.

No

7. Commentary

The lack of representation and collective bargaining in the sea fisheries sector is due to the structure of the sector itself, and in particular the size and the nature of companies that are active in the specific sector. Specifically, according to data provided by the Statistical Service the sector is dominated by very small personal enterprises, the majority of which have no employees at all. In particular, out of a total of 115 companies in 2009, 104 were registered as self-employed and only 11 were limited companies, employing an average of two employees. Against this background, terms and conditions of employment are determined at personal level.

Eva Soumeli, INEK/PEO

Useful? Interesting? Tell us what you think. Hide comments

Dodaj komentarz