Publications

1123 items found

Eurofound publishes its work in a range of publication formats to match audience needs and the nature of the output. These include flagship reports on a particular area of activity, research reports summarising the findings of a research project and policy briefs presenting policy pointers from research projects or facts and figures relevant to policy debates. Also included are blog articles, regular articles on working life in Europe, presentations, working papers providing background material to ongoing or already concluded research, and reports arising from ad hoc requests by policymakers. Other corporate publications include annual reports, brochures and promotional publications. Web databases and online resources such as data visualisation applications are available in Data and resources.


  • Representativeness of the European social partner organisations: Paper industry - Denmark

    The paper sector has become less important in the Danish economy over the last decade due to production being transferred abroad. There are three representative organisations in the sector, two of which are trade unions. The three organisat...
  • Promoting gender equality in the workplace: Two company case examples

    /Corporate strategies are nowadays considered critical in the promotion of gender equality in the workplace. Promoting an equality sensitive approach in human resource management is still a major challenge for companies and policymakers. The two company case examples operate in the financial services sector with their headquarters in the Netherlands. Both companies have put strategies in place to improve the representation of women at higher-level positions by facilitating flexible working hours and contributing to childcare costs./
  • Wpływ recesji na politykę zarządzania wiekiem (Streszczenie)

    Eurofound’s research on ‘Restructuring in recession and labour force participation’ explored the age management practices of companies in light of restructuring undergone during the recession. The study looked at policy in relation to the retention of older workers (aged 50 or more) in employment at national and establishment levels in nine European Union (EU) Member States: Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Latvia, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom.
  • Ethnic entrepreneurship - Case study: Bologna, Italy

    In 2006, the Congress of Local and Regional Authorities of the Council of Europe, the city of Stuttgart and Eurofound formed the ‘European network of cities for local integration policies' (CLIP). This fourth and final module of the CLIP project looks at ethnic entrepreneurship. The general aim of this module is to explore the development of ethnic entrepreneurship and to review the role of policy interventions in that process. It is motivated by the desire of municipal, national and European governments as well as third sector institutions, who want to create an environment that is conducive to setting up and developing small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in general and ethnic businesses in particular. This case study was carried out in Bologna.
  • Ethnic entrepreneurship - Case study: Athens, Greece

    In 2006, the Congress of Local and Regional Authorities of the Council of Europe, the city of Stuttgart and Eurofound formed the ‘European network of cities for local integration policies' (CLIP). This fourth and final module of the CLIP project looks at ethnic entrepreneurship. The general aim of this module is to explore the development of ethnic entrepreneurship and to review the role of policy interventions in that process. It is motivated by the desire of municipal, national and European governments as well as third sector institutions, who want to create an environment that is conducive to setting up and developing small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in general and ethnic businesses in particular. This case study was carried out in Athens.
  • Ethnic entrepreneurship - Case study: Malmö, Sweden

    In 2006, the Congress of Local and Regional Authorities of the Council of Europe, the city of Stuttgart and Eurofound formed the ‘European network of cities for local integration policies' (CLIP). This fourth and final module of the CLIP project looks at ethnic entrepreneurship. The general aim of this module is to explore the development of ethnic entrepreneurship and to review the role of policy interventions in that process. It is motivated by the desire of municipal, national and European governments as well as third sector institutions, who want to create an environment that is conducive to setting up and developing small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in general and ethnic businesses in particular. This case study was carried out in Malmö.
  • Ethnic entrepreneurship - Case study: Turku, Finland

    In 2006, the Congress of Local and Regional Authorities of the Council of Europe, the city of Stuttgart and Eurofound formed the ‘European network of cities for local integration policies' (CLIP). This fourth and final module of the CLIP project looks at ethnic entrepreneurship. The general aim of this module is to explore the development of ethnic entrepreneurship and to review the role of policy interventions in that process. It is motivated by the desire of municipal, national and European governments as well as third sector institutions, who want to create an environment that is conducive to setting up and developing small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in general and ethnic businesses in particular. This case study was carried out in Turku.
  • Data report on work attitudes - Background paper

    This report aimed to assess the main dimensions of work attitudes in the European Union and in a selected sample of extra-EU countries, by analysing several data sources in a comparative way. Some preliminary conclusions can be drawn. It seems that countries at different stages of industrial development experience different combinations of preference for work, job characteristics, work ethics and life satisfaction. Developing countries seem to put work before family and leisure time, while assigning a lower overall importance to social life and relational goods. On the other hand, advanced, post-industrial economies seem to assign a higher relevance to social life, while showing a preference for intangible job characteristics, higher levels of life satisfaction and weaker work ethics.
  • Netherlands: Stable working conditions with decline in work disability

    The quality of work in the Netherlands remains quite stable, with a small increase in exposure to time pressure. Despite the stable working conditions, fewer workers feel that protective measures are needed. Changes in work disability regulations have led to far fewer workers dropping out of employment due to disability. However, it appears that some employees with health issues voluntarily choose to leave the workforce.
  • Unions fear eastern European workers may be exploited

    In 2011, almost 13,360 foreigners registered with the body implementing employee insurance schemes (UWV), up from 9,756 in 2010. More than 60% of these workers originate from Bulgaria or Romania. Without a valid work permit, people from these countries may only work as self-employed individuals or be seconded. However, despite the economic downturn and slump in the construction industry, the number of posted Romanians and Bulgarians rose by 35% in 2011. At the beginning of 2012, a 16% increase in the number of self-employed Romanians and Bulgarians was registered. Many, however, do not appear in official statistics and it is estimated that between 80,000 and 100,000 Bulgarians and Romanians are employed in undeclared work [1] (*NL1111019I* [2]). In mid-2010, the Minister of Social Affairs, Henk Kamp, tried to discourage less well-educated Romanians and Bulgarians from working in the Netherlands by announcing that it would become more difficult for them to obtain work permits, although 7,640 work permits were still granted in 2010. Those critical of the minister's measures predicted that these people would find another way to work in the Netherlands, and were proved correct as the increasing number of posted workers [3] shows. [1] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/industrial-relations-dictionary/undeclared-work [2] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/articles/undefined/committee-urges-end-to-abuse-of-migrant-workers [3] www.eurofound.europa.eu/ef/observatories/eurwork/industrial-relations-dictionary/posted-workers

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