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  • Article
    27 June 1997

    At the end of May 1997, the Foreign Secretary, Robin Cook, signalled the
    Government's intention of supporting new employment provisions in the
    revision of the EU Treaty. He argued that initiatives to increase levels of
    employment within the EU should have equal weight with the financial criteria
    to be decided for Economic and Monetary Union. Believing that tackling
    unemployment is a number one priority, Mr Cook also said "that is why we will
    support an employment chapter within the treaty of the EU."

  • Article
    27 June 1997

    In May 1997, the Italian Government proposed emergency measures to modify the
    pensions system in view of the entry criteria for EU Economic and Monetary
    Union (EMU), causing particular problems in the schools sector.

  • Article
    27 June 1997

    In his inaugural address to the National Assembly on 19 June 1997, France's
    new Prime Minister, Lionel Jospin, said nothing to clarify his position on
    the privatisation programme planned by the outgoing Government.

  • Article
    27 June 1997

    During May-June 1997, Portuguese trade unions took part in the rallies and
    days of action organised throughout the countries of the European Union in
    order to emphasise work and employment as prime concerns for future European
    policies

  • Article
    27 June 1997

    On 28 May 1997, the Labour Court ruled that the municipality of Mjölby in
    southern Sweden did not discriminate against two women teachers by paying
    them SEK 1,119 less per month than their male colleague was paid for the same
    job (AD 1997:68). The judgment is the latest of several setbacks for women
    invoking the Act on Equality between Men and Women by claiming sex
    discrimination in relation to pay.

  • Article
    27 June 1997

    On 8 April 1997 negotiations over this year's national collective agreement
    covering all wage workers in hotels and restaurants ended without agreement,
    and the negotiators have not met formally since. The Hotel, Restaurant,
    Personal Services Workers Trade Union (Gewerkschaft Hotel Gastgewerbe
    Persönlicher Dienst, HGPD) staged some protests in May, but essentially
    focused on a province-by-province strategy of securing collective agreements.

  • Article
    27 June 1997

    In June 1997, the Norwegian Parliament turned down a legislative proposal
    which would provide employees with a right both to choose their own
    organisation or not to be organised. The aim of the proposal was primarily to
    prohibit collective agreements with closed shop clauses. This would have had
    a particular impact on employees in enterprises affiliated to the labour
    movement.

  • Article
    27 June 1997

    The 1997 collective bargaining round for the 1.3 million employees in the
    German construction industry started on 27 February. In contrast to most
    branch-level bargaining, which takes place at regional level, negotiations in
    the construction industry are traditionally held at national level. The
    collective bargaining parties - the construction union IG Bauen-Agrar-Umwelt
    (IG BAU) and the two employers' associations, Hauptverband der Deutschen
    Bauindustrie (HDB) and Zentralverband des Deutschen Baugewerbes (ZDB) - had
    to find new agreements on at least four main issues:

  • Article
    27 June 1997

    On 3 June 1997 the Transport and General Workers' Union (TGWU) representing
    9,000 British Airways ground staff and BASSA, the cabin crew union (linked to
    the TGWU) representing a further 9,000 employees, began balloting members
    over whether to take industrial action. On 9 June, they were joined by 4,500
    members of the GMB general union. If the ballots support strike action, it is
    likely to take place in mid-July.

Series

  • New forms of employment

    This series reports on the new forms of employment emerging across Europe that are driven by societal, economic and technological developments and are different from traditional standard or non-standard employment in a number of ways. This series explores what characterises these new employment forms and what implications they have for working conditions and the labour market.

  • European Company Surveys

    The European Company Survey (ECS) is carried out every four to five years since its inception in 2004–2005, with the latest edition in 2019. The survey is designed to provide information on workplace practices to develop and evaluate socioeconomic policy in the EU. It covers issues around work organisation, working time arrangements and work–life balance, flexibility, workplace innovation, employee involvement, human resource management, social dialogue, and most recently also skills use, skills strategies and digitalisation.

  • European Quality of Life Surveys

    The European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) is carried out every four to five years since its inception in 2003, with the latest edition in 2016. It examines both the objective circumstances of people's lives and how they feel about those circumstances and their lives in general. It covers issues around employment, income, education, housing, family, health and work–life balance. It also looks at subjective topics, such as people's levels of happiness and life satisfaction, and perceptions of the quality of society.

  • European Jobs Monitor

    This series brings together publications and other outputs of the European Jobs Monitor (EJM), which tracks structural change in European labour markets. The EJM analyses shifts in the employment structure in the EU in terms of occupation and sector and gives a qualitative assessment of these shifts using various proxies of job quality – wages, skill-levels, etc.

  • European Quality of Life Survey 2016

    Eurofound's European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) examines both the objective circumstances of European citizens' lives and how they feel about those circumstances and their lives in general. This series consists of outputs from the EQLS 2016, the fourth edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 2003. 

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2015

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2015, the sixth edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Working Conditions Survey 1996

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 1996, the second edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2001

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2001, which was an extension of the EWCS 2000 to cover the then 12 acceding and candidate countries. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Working Conditions Survey 2000

    Eurofound’s European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) paints a wide-ranging picture of Europe at work across countries, occupations, sectors and age groups. This series consists of findings from the EWCS 2000, the third edition of the survey. The survey was first carried out in 1990.

  • European Company Survey 2004

    Eurofound’s European Company Survey (ECS) maps and analyses company policies and practices which can have an impact on smart, sustainable and inclusive growth, as well as the development of social dialogue in companies. This series consists of outputs from the first edition of the survey carried out in 2004–2005 under the name European Establishment Survey on Working Time and Work-Life Balance. 

Forthcoming publications