Union confederation approves collective bargaining framework for 2007

In late January 2007, the majority trade unions and employer organisations reached preliminary consensus on the Agreement on Collective Bargaining (ANC) for 2007, which sets out the framework for negotiations in 2007. In line with the overall economic objectives, the new agreement provides for wage moderation, promoting open-ended employment contracts, and equal opportunities for men and women in collective bargaining. On 6 February, the Trade Union Confederation of Workers’ Commissions finally approved and signed the ANC.

Social partners sign ANC

After studying the content of the 2007 Agreement on Collective Bargaining (Acuerdo para la Negociación Colectiva, ANC), the Confederal Council of the Trade Union Confederation of Workers’ Commissions (Confederación Sindical de Comisiones Obreras, CC.OO), one of the majority trade unions, ratified its support for the agreement by registering 45 votes in favour of it, 12 votes against and six abstentions. The text of the ANC was presented by the Secretary of CC.OO’s Trade Union Action and Sectoral Policies’ division, Ignacio Fernández Toxo, who represented the confederation on the bargaining commission.

On 25 January 2007, the trade unions and employer organisations reached preliminary consensus on the ANC. The main objectives of the agreement include wage moderation, promoting open-ended employment contracts, and equal opportunities for men and women in collective bargaining.

Subsequently, on 6 February 2007, the trade unions and employer organisations signed the ANC at the headquarters of the Economic and Social Council (Consejo Económico y Social, CES) in Madrid (ES0702019I).

Objectives of CC.OO

In his report to the Confederal Council, the General Secretary of CC.OO, José María Fidalgo, confirmed the confederation’s strategy to establish its own agenda, to maintain its leadership in the representation of workers and in terms of trade union membership, and to improve its practices in resource management. CC.OO aims to make the trade union stronger and more autonomous, to reinforce relationships with workers and to become more beneficial to them. In doing so, the confederation intends to establish a greater presence in companies and sectors by using more efficient organisational instruments. Moreover, in the area of policy, CC.OO aims to extend collective agreements as a key element of the expansion of rights, and to simultaneously reinforce collective industrial relations.

Content of 2007 collective bargaining agreement

The preliminary agreement reached on 25 January 2007 between the trade unions and employer organisations emphasises the favourable evolution of inflation and positive economic growth in the country over the past few years. However, the signatory parties also see the possible slowdown in investment in construction and the increase in interest rates which may hinder further continuous economic growth and job creation. The 2007 ANC therefore continues to propose a moderate pay rise, promotes recruitment on open-ended contracts and aims towards defining equal opportunities for men and women in collective bargaining. Furthermore, it highlights the need to reinforce investment in education, training and professional qualifications, in order to change the model of competitiveness by increasing added value instead of taking the traditional approach of reducing costs. The agreement will remain in force throughout 2007 and, if the main growth and employment figures are maintained, will be extended by the signatory parties to 2008.

Celine Lafoucriere, CIREM Foundation

Useful? Interesting? Tell us what you think. Hide comments

Eurofound welcomes feedback and updates on this regulation

Add new comment