Work organisation and innovation in Ireland - Case study: Medtronic Galway

Case study
Published
16 September 2013
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Abstract

Medtronic is the world’s largest medical technology company, currently employing around 45,000 staff globally. In its search to become the market leader in its area, around two years ago Medtronic Galway introduced lean processes to both its production and support services. The Galway plant is one of Medtronic’s largest production plants globally and is an important employer in the west of Ireland. Based on a number of case study interviews focusing on its recent workplace innovation, a number of interesting findings emerged, such as: innovation as a necessity for the future of the company; communication as a key factor for engaging employees; mutually beneficial solutions such as smoother production and enhanced staff responsibility; top-down innovation with some involvement of workers; trade union involvement; increase in output and wages – fair reward for extra contribution; increase in productivity; lack of trade union concern over the increase in monitoring staff performance and cross-skilling; interaction between external and internal trade union.
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    Number of Pages: 
    13
    Reference No: 
    EF13482
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    Work organisation and innovation in Ireland - Case study: Medtronic Galway

    Medtronic is the world’s largest medical technology company, currently employing around 45,000 staff globally. In its search to become the market leader in its area, around two years ago Medtronic Galway introduced lean processes to both its production and support services. The Galway plant is one of Medtronic’s largest production plants globally and is an important employer in the west of Ireland. Based on a number of case study interviews focusing on its recent workplace innovation, a number of interesting findings emerged, such as: innovation as a necessity for the future of the company; communication as a key factor for engaging employees; mutually beneficial solutions such as smoother production and enhanced staff responsibility; top-down innovation with some involvement of workers; trade union involvement; increase in output and wages – fair reward for extra contribution; increase in productivity; lack of trade union concern over the increase in monitoring staff performance and cross-skilling; interaction between external and internal trade union.

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