Addressing the gender pay gap: Government and social partner actions – Luxembourg

  • Observatory: EurWORK
  • Topic:
  • Inequality,
  • Pay and income,
  • Working conditions,
  • Published on: 26 April 2010



About
Country:
Luxembourg
Author:
Odette Wlodarski
Institution:

Disclaimer: This information is made available as a service to the public but has not been edited by the European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions. The content is the responsibility of the authors.

The gender pay gap in Luxembourg varies between 13.9% and 19.6% according to whether the medians or the averages of the gross monthly salaries are considered, or between 15.3% and 19.1% for median and average gross hourly wages. Of course, the observed reality lies between these two extreme cases. In Luxembourg, an Equality Delegate is appointed within each staff delegation, obligatory for companies employing at least 15 people. Its role is to defend the equality of treatment between the establishment’s male and female employees with regard to access to employment, to training and to professional promotion, as well as pay and working conditions. There is also a governmental consultative body responsible for studying all matters relating to women’s activity, training and professional promotion where the social partners are represented: the Women Work Committee.

1. The gender pay gap: national data

1.1. Please provide the reference details (see fact-sheet below), including a brief summary, of the main studies and research on the size and the determinants of the gender pay gap in your country published in the period 1999-2009.

National studies on the gender pay gap

National studies on the gender pay gap

Fact-sheet no. 1

Title

Egalité hommes-femmes, mythe ou réalité?

Authors

Serge Allegrezza, Armande Frising, Antoine Haag, Jean Langers, Liliane Reichmann et Marco Schockmel

Year of publication

2007

Bibliographic references

ALLEGREZZA (S.), FRISING (A.), HAAG (A.), LANGERS (J.), REICHMANN (L.) and SCHOCKMEL (M.). (2007), Egalité hommes-femmes, mythe ou réalité? Luxembourg: STATEC.

Link to electronic copy of the report

http://www.statistiques.public.lu/fr/publications/series/cahiersEconomiques/2007/105_egalite/105_egalite.pdf

Coverage (nation-wide, sectors, occupations, regions, etc: please specify in detail)

Nationwide coverage: Luxembourg

Sector: private

Time span (e.g. 1995-2003)

2002 and 2005

Data-set (official, ad-hoc survey or study, etc: please specify in detail)

Official studies: “Enquête sur la structure des salaires” (STATEC), 2002 and study by PSELL/EUSILC, 2005

Type of analyses performed on the data-set (methods, e.g. Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition)

Descriptive analyses on the data gathered by “Enquête sur la structure des salaires” (STATEC) in 2002 and Oaxaca-Ransom (1994) on the data gathered by PSELL/EUSILC in 2005

Main results. Unadjusted gender pay gap (W/M%): please indicate both levels and trends

“Enquête sur la structure des salaires” (STATEC):

The gap varies between 13.9% and 19.6% according to whether the medians or the averages of the gross monthly salaries are considered, or between 15.3% and 19.1% for median and average gross hourly wages. Of course, the observed reality lies between these two extreme cases.

PSELL/EUSILC:

An average gap of 27%.

Main results. Adjusted gender pay gap (W/M%): please indicate both levels and trends

“Enquête structure des salaires” (STATEC):

If one takes the totality of these gaps as a whole, it can be seen that the fact of being a man increases the gross hourly wage by 15.7% compared to the fact of being a woman.

PSELL/EUSILC:

On the basis of an average gap of 27%, the residual gap unexplained by individual characteristics

(i.e. the discrimination part) varies from 12% to 23%:

- 23% if the structure of reference is that of women;

- 21% if the structure of reference is an average structure of men and women;

- 19% if the structure of reference is that of men;

- 12% if the structure of reference is a weighted intermediate structure of men and women;

Main results. Please list the individual and/or workplace variables taken into consideration in the adjusted gender pay gap (e.g. education, age, seniority, working hours, occupation, region, sector, firm size, etc.)

The human capital (age, nationality and level of education), the factors linked to the company (seniority, method of employment and the assignment of personnel supervision tasks) and also the geographical factors (place of residence).

Main results. Which ‘institutional’ or policy variables (qualitative or quantitative) have been taken into account in the study?

Is there evidence (i.e. in multi-national studies incorporating your country, or when observing a national switch in policies such as, for instance, the introduction of sectoral minimum wages) that certain institutional factors or policies have tended to affect (narrow) the gender pay gap?

No information found

Main results. The determinants of the gender pay gap: please provide a brief summary

As far as the human capital factors were studied, 56% of the variance observed on the gross salaries was explained. A gender effect is clearly emphasised.

A second analysis reveals the effect of the sector variable. Besides a gender effect, there is a classification of the highest-paid sectors (65% of the variance observed in the gross wages).

Third, when the personal characteristics of the employees were added to the above mentioned factors, the « married » status is higher paid than the « divorced » one. The gender effect is always noticeable and it amounts to 16%.

Fourth and last, all the variables are taken into account, which amount to 74.3% of the variance observed on the gross wages.

By considering all of the variables, it is observed that, the sole fact of being a male employee increases the hourly gross wages to 15.7%. The effect of the gender variable concerning the chances of being covered by a collective wage agreement is weak, but men have better chances than women.

Main results. Policy recommendations: please provide a brief summary

No information found

National studies on the gender pay gap

National studies on the gender pay gap

Fact-sheet no. 2

Title

L’Égalité de salaire, défi du développement démocratique et économique

Authors

Blandine LEJEALLE

Year of publication

2002

Bibliographic references

LEJEALLE (B.). L’Égalité de salaire, défi du développement démocratique et économique. Synthèse de l’étude quantitative réalisée par le CEPS / INSTEAD, 2002, Luxembourg, Ministère de la Promotion Féminine.

Link to electronic copy of the report

http://www.mega.public.lu/publications/1_brochures/2003/egalite_salaire/synthese_salaire.PDF

Coverage (nation-wide, sectors, occupations, regions, etc: please specify in detail)

Nationwide

Time span (e.g. 1995-2003)

1995 and 2000

Data-set (official, ad-hoc survey or study, etc: please specify in detail)

Official:

For the data concerning the year 2000: CEPS/Instead (Centre d’Etudes de Populations, de Pauvreté et de Politiques Socio-Economiques / International Networks for Studies in Technology, Environment, Alternatives, Development)

For the data concerning the year 1995: l'Enquête sur la Structure des Salaires du STATEC (Service Central de la Statistique et des Etudes Economiques)

Type of analyses performed on the data-set (methods, e.g. Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition)

No information found

Main results. Unadjusted gender pay gap (W/M%): please indicate both levels and trends

1995: 15%

2000: 28%

Main results. Adjusted gender pay gap (W/M%): please indicate both levels and trends

1995: 11%

2000: 12%

Main results. Please list the individual and/or workplace variables taken into consideration in the adjusted gender pay gap (e.g. education, age, seniority, working hours, occupation, region, sector, firm size, etc.)

Among the structural pay gaps, the following reasons can be distinguished :

- More than 40% are explained by the occupations concerned: if women are less well

paid, on average, than men, it is because they hold posts that are less well placed in the business and therefore the pay hierarchy. If women did the same work as men, that would enable the identified structural pay gap to be reduced by 40%.

- A third is explained by the differences of lengths of career: Women’s career interruptions are detrimental for their pay levels.

- 7% of the differences are explained by the length of service within the company; not only the overall business experience is remunerated in the fixing of the pay levels, but also loyalty to the company in which people work; and on this point, women are also, on average, less loyal than men to their companies.

Consideration of the training level enables the gender pay gap to be reduced. Although women today have a diploma level equivalent to that of the men, there are certain women who do not and this explains part of the under-remuneration of female employment (approximately 6%). If the effect of the differences in the levels of training on the fixing of the pay levels seems small, it is mainly because it is already expressed in the type of activity that is being exercised. Indeed, the training level and the activity exercised are strongly interdependent.

The fact of working in the public or the private sector explains 4% of the differences as a whole. Indeed, women are more often employed than men in the private sector which, furthermore, pays less well overall than the public sector.

The size of the company also accounts for 4% in reducing the residual pay gap, because women are less frequently employed in big companies which are, furthermore, more generous with their employees.

Main results. Which ‘institutional’ or policy variables (qualitative or quantitative) have been taken into account in the study?

Is there evidence (i.e. in multi-national studies incorporating your country, or when observing a national switch in policies such as, for instance, the introduction of sectoral minimum wages) that certain institutional factors or policies have tended to affect (narrow) the gender pay gap?

No information found

Main results. The determinants of the gender pay gap: please provide a brief summary

Among the reasons for the structural gender pay gap, the following points are particularly relevant:

1) The training level and the educational orientation,

2) The occupational, sectoral and hierarchical specialisation, and the specialisation related to the weekly working time,

3) The career periods.

Main results. Policy recommendations: please provide a brief summary

1) Enhanced conciliation of family and working life is essential, for men and for women alike. Companies should change their generally accepted ideas that positions of responsibility can only be held on a full-time basis.

2) The stereotypes attributed to women by society in general and in particular the deep-rooted stereotypes in relation to the educational and business orientation of young women should be abandoned.

3) Personnel policies should be oriented towards a finer definition of employees’ professional profiles (type of post, tasks carried out, level of responsibility, degree of supervision, sector occupied, experience gained, etc) and therefore a measurement closer to the actual pay for equivalent posts. This highlights the interest, for a company wanting to respect gender equality, to adopt an analytical job evaluation and classification system.

1.2. Are there any studies published in the 1999-2009 period, possibly using qualitative methods, which investigate the social processes which contribute to determining the gender pay gap through selection, occupational segregation, discrimination, and the like? Is there any research on the development of pay gaps during the life course? Do pay gaps emerge at the beginning of the individual careers of women or do they become significant at later stages of professional development? Because of different gendered career paths or because pay gaps tend to increase as the professional career advances (i.e. higher gaps at higher organisation positions)?

According to a 2007 study by CEPS/Instead, a comparison of the male and female data on the employment characteristics in Luxembourg shows rather different profiles for male and female employment.

Luxembourg is known for the strong tertiarisation of its activities. Tertiarisation is on-going and is to the benefit of women, who continue to be absent from jobs in industrial sectors. More than 57% of national employment comes from the tertiary sector: approximately 75% of men are involved in the tertiary sector, as against more than 90% of women.

The concentration of female employment such as it is noticeable in certain sectors of activity is also found in the occupational ranking: women are less present than men in the so-called higher businesses. If one takes the financial sector, men continue to occupy the highest posts of the business hierarchy: only 23% of the managerial posts are held by women. However, a distinct change is being felt: 15 years ago, they represented only 12% of these posts.

According to the data source, the definition used and the population concerned, the part-time work rate varies between 30 and 36% for women and from 3 to 7% for men. Part-time work has increased without precedent: in 2002, only a quarter of working women worked part-time, as against a third in 2006. Part-time work is most widespread among unskilled female workers and employees: 63% of the jobs of this kind. The degree of satisfaction in relation to the number of hours worked seems relatively high (94% are satisfied with their working hours) and this applies both to men and to women.

In 2006, according to the data of the General Social Security Inspectorate, the average gross hourly female pay (of women working more than 15 hours per week) amounted to 87% of the average gross hourly male pay. There is therefore on average a gap of 13%. This unfavourable ratio for women is maintained for workers (82%) and for employees (76%), but is very slightly favourable for civil servants (103%).

Source: Les Femmes et le marché de l’emploi, CEPS/Instead, actualisation 2007. http://www.mega.public.lu/publications/1_brochures/2007/femmes_emploi/marche_emploi07.pdf http://www.mega.public.lu/publications/1_brochures/2007/femmes_emploi/marche_emploi07.pdf

According to a 2003 study by CEPS/Instead, for all generations, there are few women who have never exercised any business activity; on the other hand, what is new is that the interruptions as regards employment are less frequently definitive and that the interruption periods are shorter. Among women who have had a job for at least 6 months, more than half of them have stopped work at least once (58%) and 42% have never stopped since their first job. Among those who have stopped, the great majority did so only once (88%), 9% have stopped twice and 3% had at least three interruptions.

45% of all interruptions by women between the age of 19 to 65 were because of children, either for giving birth or for care responsibilities at a later stage. Marriage is mentioned in 23% of the cases. The other reasons are far from being of equal weight: approximately 7% of the interruptions took place following a dismissal (or an end of contract or a company closure), 6% for health reasons and a little more than 4% because of a change of address (especially in the case of immigrant households). Stopping for training purposes or for looking after children or elderly is of minimal weight: about 1% each. The other reasons (approximately 13%) are the following: women no longer wanting to work (because they have too much work, because the job is not satisfactory, because they have worked enough or they want to stay at home), some mentioned personal or family reasons without specifying them, others have already retired.

The reasons for starting to work again strongly echo the reasons for stopping.

Source: Les carrières professionnelles des femmes au Luxembourg, CEPS/Instead, 2003 http://www.mega.public.lu/publications/1_brochures/2005/carrieres_professionnelles/Carrieres_professionnelles.pdf

1.3. Are there any studies in your country on how gender differentials of pay have been affected by the current economic crisis?

No

2. Government initiatives to address the gender pay gap

2.1. In light of the current economic crisis, has the national government taken any steps to assess and monitor the impact of the current economic downturn on gender pay inequalities? If yes, please briefly illustrate them, including the results of such assessment. Has the government started any initiatives to prevent or address the possible widening of the gender pay gap because of the economic downturn?

No such information available.

2.2. Please illustrate the major government initiatives to address the gender pay gap put in place since 2005. Since there is extensive legislation on gender equality, interventions are usually of an indirect nature.

Labour Code:

  • The Equality Delegate: Within each staff delegation, obligatory within companies employing at least 15 people, an Equality Delegate shall be appointed. The Delegate’s role shall be to defend the equal treatment between the establishment’s male and female employees with regard to access to employment, to training and to professional promotion, as well as the pay and the work conditions. (Labour Code, Article L 414-3)

Establishment of consultative and co-operative bodies:

  • Inter-Ministerial Gender Equality Committee: this is a governmental consultative body charged with monitoring the implementation of the National Gender Equality Action Plan.
  • Female Work Committee: this is a governmental consultative body responsible for studying all matters relating to women’s activity, training and professional promotion.
  • Positive Action Committee (see below)
  • Gender Training Network: All of the participants in the Equal Opportunity Ministry’s gender training.
  • Representation of the Equal Opportunity Ministry in government organisations

Public Campaigns:

  • Information on persistent inequality in terms of pay and positions of responsibility.
  • Promotion of equal opportunity between men and women and a balanced gender representation at all levels of society. Objective: to achieve a change of mentality in favour of such gender equality.
  • Specific awareness-raising campaigns intended for ‘communicators’ (the media especially) relating to equality in the media and in advertising, with the publication of a public communication guide intended for State communicators.

Gender Equality Projects:

  • European Projects (2006): The Role Of Men In The Promotion Of Gender Equality , Gender Equality In Local Development
  • ‘Gender Budgeting’ Project. Objective: to make the national budget more effective and more egalitarian in terms of gender. (2006)
  • Implementation and evaluation of the National Gender Equality Action Plan (2007, 2008)
  • Study of the importance of gender in kindergarten, primary and secondary school practice.
  • Promotion of new roles for men and women by actions aiming to increase gender awareness and knowledge among trainers, teachers and pupils and to identify internal strategies, mechanisms and tools with regard to teacher- and trainer-oriented gender education and training methodology. (2005)
  • Girls’ Day / Boys’ Day. Objective: to contribute to the diversification of the professional choice for boys and girls and to increase their chances of finding a job after their studies.
  • `Equal rights for boys and girls, and for men and women' Manual: 4,000 copies distributed in high schools. Objective: to inform the young not only about existing gender inequalities but also about the possibilities of changing that particular state of affairs. (2007)

Actions seeking to promote equality within private sector companies:

  • ‘Positive Actions’ Project : Companies wishing to take a positive action approach i.e. measures enabling gender equality to be established in all fields and at every corporate level, have to submit their cases to the Equal Opportunity Ministry in order to obtain a grant. Selection Criteria: Innovative nature, range, potential multiplication effect, and originality. Subsequent evaluation with the aim of extending the measures to other companies.
  • Miscellaneous activities: Prix Féminin de l’Entreprise (2006), `Diversity and Equal Opportunities’ (2006) Seminar, ‘Gender Equality In Employment: Reality or Myth?' Conference (2007), ‘Achieving Gender Pay Equality’ Conference (2008)

2.3. Please illustrate the main initiatives by the government to address the gender pay gap since 2005 in the public sector. Here the government acts as the employer and can intervene more directly, even if often the rules on compensation leave less room for pay differentials.

Actions seeking to promote equality within the public sector:

  • Communal Gender Equality Policy (12/2006 to 02/2008) - measurement of the National Equality Action Plan. The objectives are to analyse the local authorities’ political processes in order to identify the incorporation of the gender dimension into local development, to define quality standards for the implementation of the gender equality policies at the local level, to raise awareness of the importance of incorporating the gender dimension into development and the local environment, to transcend the traditional roles and stereotypes in local circles.
  • PROGRESS Project (2008), the objective of which is to incorporate the gender dimension into national policies by training the State and Municipal civil servants.
  • Gender training for the members of the ministries’ Gender Competence Cells and for the Equality Delegates in public office (2005).

3. Social partner initiatives to address the gender pay gap

3.1. In light of the current economic crisis, have the social partners, whether unilaterally or jointly, taken any steps to assess and monitor the impact of the current economic downturn on gender pay inequalities? If yes, please briefly illustrate them, including the results of such assessment. Have the social partners started any initiatives to prevent or address the possible widening of the gender pay gap because of the economic downturn?

No such information available.

3.2. Please indicate whether the gender pay gap has figured prominently on the trade union agenda since 2005. Have the trade unions initiated in this period any specific initiatives to address the gender pay gap? Please illustrate the most important of such initiatives.

As regards gender equality issues, the trade unions are represented on the Female Work Committee (comité du travail féminin). The Female Work Committee is a governmental consultative body responsible for studying, either on its own initiative or at the government’s request, all matters relating to women’s activity, training and professional promotion. The particularity of this body lies in its tripartite composition (representatives of employers, unions and government). The committee is also invited to issue an opinion on any new bill which could have an impact on gender equality.

There are few “individual” initiatives (occasionally the organisation of a conference on a particular subject). Mainly, the trade unions support and relay the government’s initiatives (e.g. the organisation of the Girls’ Day).

The LCGB has reiterated to the new Equal Opportunity Minister its desire to see the Government amend the law on collective agreements so that employers are forced to discuss pay equality in the course of the collective bargaining. Furthermore, the LCGB is demanding a systematic investigation with the objective of determining which sectors – first and foremost among which the tertiary sector - present the widest pay gaps.

The OGBL wants to increase the density of pay agreements in Luxembourg by negotiating new collective agreements. The union believes that the proportion of women, in the majority of those companies, is very high. The introduction of collective agreements would, for the trade union, be a giant step in the direction of gender pay equality and, more generally, of equal opportunity between the sexes in the world of work.

3.3. Please indicate whether the gender pay gap has figured prominently on the employer associations agenda since 2005. Have the main employer associations initiated in this period any specific initiatives to address the gender pay gap? Please illustrate the most important of such initiatives.

Just like the trade unions, the employers' associations support and relay governmental initiatives.

In addition, there are some other initiatives, including the creation of the National Institute for Sustainable Development and Corporate Social Responsibility and the Federation of Female Business Leaders.

The National Institute for Sustainable Development and Corporate Social Responsibility (INDR) was created by the Luxembourg Companies Union (Union des entreprises luxembourgeoises - UEL) in collaboration with the Government’s Office for Foreigners (Commissariat du Gouvernement aux Etrangers) within the Ministry for Family and Integration in the context of the European Progress 2008 programme in favour of employment and social solidarity. Its objective is to promote awareness among Luxembourg companies of the economic and social benefits of socially responsible commitment.

“The Social and Equal Professional Opportunity Certificate” is the first stage of a certification process undertaken by the INDR. “The Social and Equal Professional Opportunity Certificate” is articulated around eleven objectives, including an absence of discrimination at the recruitment level, an integration policy encouraging diversity and equal professional opportunity, and an equitable policy in terms of promotion.

After the Forum entitled “Femmes et Entreprises: Créer son entreprise…et participer à un réseau d’échanges” (Women and Companies: Create Your Company… and Participate in an Exchange Network), an initiative of the Luxembourg Companies Union (UEL) and the Equal Opportunity Ministry, the not-for-profit Federation of Female Business Leaders (FFCEL) was created. This organisation’s objectives include, inter alia, encouraging the accession of women to high-level corporate positions.

3.4. Please indicate whether multi-employer collective bargaining has contributed to address the gender pay gap since 2005. Has multi-employer collective bargaining introduced specific clauses or instruments to address the gender pay gap? Please illustrate the most important of such clauses or instruments.

According to the Act of 30 June 2004 on Collective Work Agreements, sectoral agreements or those covering several companies can include the modalities according to which a plan for equal gender treatment can be envisaged in the companies to which the agreement applies. There is however no overall picture on this question.

3.5. Please indicate whether single-employer collective bargaining and social dialogue practices at company level have contributed to address the gender pay gap since 2005. Has single-employer collective bargaining introduced specific clauses or instruments to address the gender pay gap at company level? Please illustrate the most important of such clauses or instruments.

No such information available.

3.6. Has the issue of the gender pay gap been particularly important in certain sectors? If yes, please indicate the sectors involved (up to three), the main reasons of such relevance and its most significant expressions and achievements (up to three for each sector - unilateral actions by employers or unions, joint initiatives, collective bargaining).

No such information available.

4. Good practices

4.1. Since 2005, have there been any major initiatives to identify, collect and disseminate good practices on equal pay or more generally on gender equality in employment?

Positive Actions

Initiator: The Equal Opportunity Ministry

Objective: An agreement entered into by the State and a company defines the framework and the collaborative conditions for the development of a positive action project in accordance with the law and the regulations in force. These positive action projects can be established either within a company, or within a branch of activity. Positive action projects are usually of a voluntary nature. An obligation of means is in particular enshrined within certain collective agreements. The implementation of positive actions enjoys the support of the Equal Opportunity Ministry. The logistical and financial implementation of a positive action project comprises several stages during which there is co-operation between the parties involved, the State and the company.

Women's Company Prize (Prix Féminin de l’Entreprise)

Initiator: The Equal Opportunity Ministry

Objective: Since 1993, the Luxembourg companies that demonstrate exemplary investment in promoting their female personnel are rewarded by the Women’s Company Prize. This prize, initially awarded by the Ministry of Labour and Employment, then by the Ministry for Female Promotion since its foundation, wants to bring to the general public’s attention the fact that gender equality in the world of work (and thus equal opportunity at a professional level) has not yet been acquired and that the efforts being made in this field are always worthy of reward. The winning companies are a model to be followed for the other companies, in order to encourage them to launch similar initiatives, plans or projects.

“Woman Business Manager of the Year Award”

Initiator: Dexia BIL

Objective: to contribute to the efforts of raising corporate awareness of the contributions of women and to promote the role of the woman in the Luxembourg economy. Dexia BIL rewards a creative corporate woman. Each year, the prize is awarded to a company of a different sector (craft industry, services, industry). The prize of EUR 10,000 per annum has to be invested in the winning company’s training, counseling, recruitment or equipment.

Company examples of good practices

Company: Avisia (Cleaning Sector)

The cleaning services sector employs mainly women, hired as unskilled workers. The positions with more responsibility furthermore are most frequently held by men. The female staff seldom benefits from continuous training measures. In a concern for constant improvement of the cleaning company’s services, supported by ISO 9001/2000 certification, a genuine quality approach has to be started, in which continuous professional training for the staff must be included. Here, the firm can choose to train a part of the staff and in particular to improve the qualifications and consequently the professional development of the female personnel. Motivated and financially supported by the “Positive action within private sector companies” programme of the Ministry for Female Promotion, the company has enabled seven employees to take part in the Acticlean Continuous Training for Success programme, in order to train them as future team leaders. The women have been targeted in order to prepare them for more demanding assignments, involving greater responsibilities.

Company: François-Elisabeth Foundation (Hospital Sector)

In 2005, the Women’s Company Prize, awarded by the Equal Opportunity Ministry to companies that have taken “positive action”, was granted to the establishments of the Fondation François-Elisabeth (FFE): the Kirchberg Hospital, Dr. Bohler’s Private Clinic and the Sainte Marie d'Esch-sur-Alzette Clinic.

The three establishments, associated within the FFE since April 2001, embarked upon their collaboration with the Equal Opportunity Ministry in December 2004. A particularly strategic moment, since that was the time when a huge staff survey was carried out, intended to improve the quality of the services offered to the patients. The gender equality dimension has con-sequently been incorporated into the three establishments’ Quality Management System (EFQM).

A satisfaction survey was developed by an internal work group, within which the management and the staff delegation of the three establishments - including the Equality Delegate - took part, then it was applied to the staff as a whole. The results of this investigation have enabled distinction to be made between the different needs or expectations of men and women on certain subjects and to reorient the measures envisaged in the quality approach, according to the gender aspect.

Company: Hapoalim (Banking Sector)

One of the main features of Hapoalim’s human resources management is the systematic support provided for individual career planning. Special attention is paid to the employees via continuous training and job rotation measures. In the context of a first positive action, the Ministry for Female Promotion financially supported a project made up inter alia of a cycle of fifteen training sessions on the theme of Stress Management – Managing Your Emotions. This project was an integrated concept based on an analysis of needs and culminating in made-to-measure training programmes. During a three-month period, all of the women and the bank’s entire staff could attend workshops during the lunch hour. During the seven-session course, the subjects of the equal gender opportunity, communication, and the management of emotions, stress and conflicts were addressed. Seven other sessions were intended for women in particular and covered subjects such as self-confidence, male and female communication rules, stress control and the establishment of career plans.

Source: http://www.mega.public.lu/publications/1_brochures/2004/potentiel_humain_III/potentiel_entreprise_III.pdf

Odette Wlodarski, Prevent

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